Before beginning any nutrition or exercise program like this one, one must consult with their doctors or other licensed physicians and receive full clearance. The author claims no responsibility to any person or entity for any liability, loss, or damage caused or alleged to be caused directly or indirectly as a result of the use, application or interpretation of the material in this product.
Eating less, however, means something different for everyone. According to Erin Coleman, R.D., L.D. in this article, if you’re an active woman, you may be looking at eating around 1,600 calories a day whereas if you’re less active, you may be looking at a diet closer to 1,200 calories a day. Regardless of the calorie limit that’s right for you, cutting down on calories can really aid in weight loss, but you must remember to make sure you’re getting all of your nutrients in, too.
Don’t forget, non-animal sources of protein including lentils, leafy-green veggies, legumes, tofu, nuts, beans and grains are all excellent sources of protein, too. Finally, if you’re struggling to meet your daily protein quota, a quality protein powder, whey or plant-based (checkout our review of PlantFusion protein) can make it easy when you’re stretched for time.
Yup. Here's what Josie Brady, 36, would tell herself about hitting the gym at the beginning of her journey: "It's not a chore anymore. Your legs are going to look and feel great. Keep working on that pull-up game. This journey is going to be for the rest of your life, so if the results you want take a little longer, so be it!" (Related: How to Make Exercise a Habit You Love) 
The modern-day Atkins program no longer emphasizes ketosis as necessary for weight loss, but it does appear that for some people it’s a very effective way to lose weight and control appetite. But with or without ketosis, the modern-day Atkins Nutritional Approach™ continues to be shown to be effective at keeping weight under control while supporting good health. Remember, even in the “moderate carbohydrate” diet used in the research, carbohydrates were only 35% of calories, protein was 30% and fat made up the rest. With a diet of adequate protein, good fat, high-fiber vegetables, low-glycemic fruit and a little whole grain in lifetime maintenance, you can’t go wrong!
"Crash diets (dramatically cutting down how much you eat) might help you to lose a few pounds at first, but they’re hard to sustain and won’t help you keep the weight off. It might seem like a quick and easy option, but eating too few calories can actually do more harm than good. If your calorie intake dips too low, your body could go into starvation mode. This will slow down your metabolism, making it harder for your body to lose weight. Make sensible, healthy changes to your lifestyle that you can stick to and avoid the fad diets."
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