The plan is simple: Commit to two weeks of restricted dieting, then transfer to a sustainable regime. Phase one: Cut out restaurant food, added sugar, eating while watching TV, snacking on anything other than fruits and veggies, and limit meat and dairy. You’re also asked to add four healthy habits, simple tweaks like having a good breakfast every morning.
The other benefit to using portion control for weight loss is that it naturally encourages healthy eating habits. If you choose to consume empty calories—foods high in saturated fats and added sugar—you won't be able to eat very much. A single portion size of chocolate, for example, is just one ounce. But if you choose to satisfy your sweet tooth with fresh fruit, you can gobble a half to a full cup of sweetness and the fiber in fruit will help you to stay full and satisfied so you're less tempted to eat again soon after snacking.
The 2019 rankings include 41 of today’s most popular diets. New to the list this year is the Nordic Diet, a plant-heavy eating plan that incorporates Scandinavian traditions and ranked 9th best overall. Here’s how the rest of the rankings shook out this year, and what experts have to say about the good, the bad, and the trendy. (Here’s a hint: They’re still not crazy about keto.)

Clare Collins has received funding from NHMRC, ARC Linkage, Heart Foundation, Hunter Medical Research Institute, SP Health and Penn Health. She is affiliated with the University of Newcastle and is Co-Director of the Priority Research Centre in Physical Activity and Nutrition, She is a Fellow of the Dietitians Association of Australia and has published guidelines for dietitians for the mangement of overweight and obesity in adults. She has consulted to SP Health, Prima Health and Shine Australia and written books for the general public on weight loss.
A 2012 study also showed that people on a low-carb diet burned 300 more calories a day – while resting! According to one of the Harvard professors behind the study this advantage “would equal the number of calories typically burned in an hour of moderate-intensity physical activity”. Imagine that: an entire bonus hour of exercise every day, without actually exercising. A later, even larger and more carefully conducted study confirmed the effect, with different groups of people on low-carb diets burning an average of between 200 and almost 500 extra calories per day.
"When we’re lacking in sleep, our body’s hormones get thrown off balance which can impact our hunger levels the next day. We all have two hormones that affect our appetite: ghrelin and leptin. When we don’t get enough sleep, our ghrelin levels (the hormone that makes us feel hungry) rise, and our leptin levels (the hormone that makes us feel full) drop. This means that when we’re awake, we tend to eat more but feel less satisfied. Try going to bed a little earlier than usual to avoid this imbalance and remember to remove any distractions that might prevent you from nodding off."
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