You’ve heard it before and I’ll say it again, drinks like energy drinks, fruit juices, and that beloved soda are loaded with sugars and unnecessary calories that only add to the weight you’re trying to lose. Sugary drinks are simply empty calories. They lack any nutritional benefits and don’t fill you up but still add to your daily calorie count. Thanks to the added sugars, such drinks also make you more prone to storing body fat–especially around your midsection.

Women usually need fewer calories than men, especially as they age. That's because women naturally have less muscle, more body fat, and are usually smaller than men. On average, adult women need between 1,600 and 2,400 calories a day. As you age, you need to take in fewer calories to maintain the same weight. You can also keep your weight healthy by increasing how much physical activity you get.
SOURCES: WebMD Feature: "With Fruits and Veggies, More Matters." 2005 U.S. Dietary Guidelines. Elizabeth Ward, MS, RD, author, The Pocket Idiot's Guide to the New Food Pyramids. Elaine Magee, MPH, RD,author, Comfort Food Makeovers. Brian Wansink, PhD, professor and director, Cornell Food and Brand Lab, Ithaca, N.Y.; author, Mindless Eating. Barbara Rolls, PhD, professor of nutritional sciences; and director, laboratory for the study of human ingestive behaviors, Penn State University; and author, The Volumetrics Eating Plan.

Breakfast truly is the most important meal of the day. It can either be the reason you maintain your diet all throughout the day or the reason you binge eat during lunch or dinner time, ruining your diet. Eating breakfast not only gives you energy to get more active throughout the day, but it also keeps you from binge eating! I think it’s safe to say that we’ve been there, done that when it comes to binge eating, and man, does it stink!
In a new study, Stanford University researchers put more than 600 overweight adults on either a healthy low-fat or low-carb diet. It turns out, participants had similar levels of weight loss success on each plan. Researchers looked for clues (such as insulin levels and gene patterns) to see if there are any factors that might make someone more successful on either diet, but after combing through the data, they were not able to make any connections. Since it may take years before scientists discover individual traits that could lead to more success on one plan compared to another, for now, we can learn a lot — and lose a lot! — by recognizing the dieting advice that all experts agree on.
For years, research has supported the fact that Weight Watchers is one of the best weight-loss diets. Thanks to its flexibility, easy-to-understand food tracking system, and group support, Weight Watchers consistently ranks number one for "best weight loss diet" and "best commercial diet" in the U.S. News & World Report rankings. (Oprah's endorsement probably didn't hurt either!) They recently revamped their program and changed their name to WW to signify a focus on overall wellness—not just weight-loss—so that users who aren't focusing on weight can also use the program to eat better, work out more, or develop a more body-positive mindset.
Sometimes, you might need an external motivator—like a race or a competition—to keep you on track. After a slow start to her slimdown, Maribel Contreras decided to sign up for a 12-week body transformation contest at her gym. She swapped out her fast-food trips for healthy homemade meals and revved up her workouts, which ultimately helped her win the competition. She now maintains a 77-pounds-lighter frame. 
An advisory committee to the government's 2010 Dietary Guidelines concluded that evidence overwhelmingly shows that diets based on the glycemic index do slightly or no better at weight loss than other types and aren't markedly superior at keeping off pounds already lost. In 2009, the independent, nonprofit Cochrane Collaboration reviewed six small, randomized controlled trials of low-GI diets tested over periods from several months to a year. Overall, low-GI dieters lost about 2 more pounds than comparison diets on average. Researchers found similar results in a study published in the New England Journal of Medicine in 2010. They examined weight-loss maintenance of 773 overweight adults on high- and low-GI diets. After 26 weeks, the low-GI dieters had regained 2 pounds less on average than their high-GI counterparts had.
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Have you ever decided to skip a meal to cut back on your daily calorie count? Despite saving a few calories in the moment, this strategy almost always backfires. When you skip breakfast, or any meal, you'll begin to experience excessive hunger that can lead to craving unhealthy foods—and lots of them. You may also eat faster than you normally do after skipping a meal, causing you to miss the warning signs that you're full and resulting in overeating.
"Protein is great for fat loss. It helps build and preserve lean muscle tissue and can increase the amount of calories you burn. It’s also a great source of energy that helps you feel fuller for longer, so you’re less tempted to snack. Good sources include chicken breast, tuna, eggs, milk and chickpeas. And if you’re finding it difficult to avoid snacks that are high in carbohydrates, try substituting them for protein shakes or bars. Remember also to opt for the lean sources of protein because some sources can be high in saturated fat."
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