This content is strictly the opinion of Dr. Josh Axe and is for informational and educational purposes only. It is not intended to provide medical advice or to take the place of medical advice or treatment from a personal physician. All readers/viewers of this content are advised to consult their doctors or qualified health professionals regarding specific health questions. Neither Dr. Axe nor the publisher of this content takes responsibility for possible health consequences of any person or persons reading or following the information in this educational content. All viewers of this content, especially those taking prescription or over-the-counter medications, should consult their physicians before beginning any nutrition, supplement or lifestyle program.

In the landmark 1993 Diabetes Control and Complications Trial, researchers compared a standard dose of insulin to a high dose designed to tightly control blood sugars in type 1 diabetic patients. Large insulin doses controlled blood sugars better, but what happened to their weight? Participants in the high-dose group gained, on average, approximately 9.8 pounds (4.5 kilograms) more than participants in the standard group. More than 30 percent of patients experienced “major” weight gain!
Obviously, it’s still possible to lose weight on any diet – just eat fewer calories than you burn, right? The problem with this simplistic advice is that it ignores the elephant in the room: Hunger. Most people don’t like to “just eat less”, i.e. being hungry forever. That’s dieting for masochists. Sooner or later, a normal person will give up and eat, hence the prevalence of “yo-yo dieting”.
Obviously, it’s still possible to lose weight on any diet – just eat fewer calories than you burn, right? The problem with this simplistic advice is that it ignores the elephant in the room: Hunger. Most people don’t like to “just eat less”, i.e. being hungry forever. That’s dieting for masochists. Sooner or later, a normal person will give up and eat, hence the prevalence of “yo-yo dieting”.
Additionally, let’s consider that since we’ve begun telling the public to reduce their intake of fats generally, and saturated fats specifically (1977), intake of fat as a percentage shifted from 40% to 35%. Intake of cheese, butter, milk and red meat decreased, while intake of vegetable oils, margarines, and fat free products shot up dramatically, being sold as a “healthier” option.
The DASH diet adopts similar principles of a Mediterranean, promoting lots of fruits and vegetables and moderate amounts of low fat dairy, lean meat, and nuts seeds and ample intake of olive oils. While lower in fat than a standard diet, it doesn’t put a specific fat limit and does encourage intake of certain healthy fats, like olive oil for instance.
Since diet and exercise are the most important factors in losing weight, sign up for my free weight loss ebook for tips, advice, and plans to help with those. As for supplements, check out a fat burner called Instant Knockout. A side note to remember though – you can’t spot reduce fat. It comes off wherever it wants to, and unfortunately, for a lot of us, belly fat is the last to go.

"Feeling stressed can wreak havoc on our bodies. It can cause our body to produce the steroid hormone cortisol, which can make you crave sugary foods that provide instant energy and pleasure. Short-term bursts of cortisol are necessary to help us cope with immediate danger, but our body will also release this hormone if we’re feeling stressed or anxious. When our cortisol levels are high for a long amount of time, it can increase the amount of fat you hold in your belly."
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