Testosterone is indisputably the king of hormones when it comes to the gym. While it’s responsible for reproductive development, it’s better known for its major role in promoting muscle growth, increasing bone density, and even how body fat is distributed. Testosterone levels are also a huge influencer in terms of overall health and emotional state. With age, however, natural testosterone production naturally declines, leading to higher levels of body fat and more difficulty building muscle, not to mention a decrease in libido.
When we face stress, our adrenal glands secrete cortisol to prepare our bodies and minds to handle the stressful situation — the primal fight-or-flight response. In small dosages, cortisol is fine and even useful, but elevated cortisol levels for prolonged periods can do some serious damage to our bodies and minds. One area that seems to take a hit when cortisol is high is our testosterone levels. Several studies have shown a link between cortisol and testosterone. When cortisol levels are high, testosterone levels are low; and when testosterone levels are high, cortisol levels are low.
On the average, you need to sleep at least 8 hours per night to stay healthy. If you want a night sleep to contribute to the maximum testosterone production, it’s important to make your sleep comfortable. Thus, the bedroom temperature shouldn’t exceed 21°C. In addition, you should ventilate your bedroom thoroughly before sleeping. Furthermore, before going to bed, don’t overload your stomach with fatty foods, as well as don’t drink alcohol and caffeinated beverages. Finally, you have to avoid intense physical activity before bedtime.6
In this article, testosterone-replacement therapy refers to the treatment of hypogonadism with exogenous testosterone — testosterone that is manufactured outside the body. Depending on the formulation, treatment can cause skin irritation, breast enlargement and tenderness, sleep apnea, acne, reduced sperm count, increased red blood cell count, and other side effects.
I’m a 70 year old male. Here’s my brief story, I was exhausted all the time after an encounter with H-Py-Lori. After may tests it was found out that my T-count was at about 250. I was put on a testosterone cream replacement therapy. Before I knew it, at about month I was at 1500 count. This was at 4 cream applications a day. The doctor took me down to twice/two applications a day, now I was at 600. I felt great at both levels.
Meat. Meat, particularly beef, provides our bodies with the protein it needs to create muscle (more muscle = more T) and the fats and cholesterol to make testosterone. My meat topping of choice was sliced up chuck steak. I grilled two of them on Monday and it lasted me until the next Monday. Every now and then I’d slow-cook some ribs or brisket to use as my meat topping. My philosophy was the fattier, the better.
After years of low libido,ED and just general lack of energy I found a urogist will to look at my symptoms. Turned out my testosterone level was 135 so I started on testosterone. Had a great improvement on everything I was having issues plus just a lot happier. My Dr. did PSA every 6 months and my PSA over almost 2 years went from 1.16 to 1.67, still pretty low for 56YOA He wanted to do a biopsy and he found 1 out of 12 cores 60%, GS3X3. I had an MRI and found a .5cm cancer, clean margins, perfectly round and dead center of the prostate.I’m doing active surviellance and the DR wants to start me on Finasteride and continue TRT. I like to believe that the years of low testosterone help the cancer to develope and the twice yearly testing of PSA by the doctor because of therapy caught it very early.I’m not too sure about TRT and Finasteride together.
Hoffman, J., Ratamess, N., Kang, J., Magine, G., Faigenbaum, A. & Stout, J. (2006, August). Effect of creatine and beta-alanine supplementation on performance and endocrine responses in strength/power athletes [Abstract]. International Journal of Sport Nutrition and Exercise Metabolism, 16(4), 430–46. Retrieved from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17136944

Many endocrinologists are sounding the alarm about the damaging effects that come with exposure to common household chemicals. Called “endocrine disruptors,” these chemicals interfere with our body’s hormone system and cause problems like weight gain and learning disabilities. One type of endocrine disruptor is particularly bad news for our testosterone levels.
Most people associate testosterone with facial hair, gigantic muscles & illegal steroids.  Naturally produced testosterone plays a very important role in male/female metabolic function.  Lowered testosterone is a chronic epidemic that is threatening lives all around the world.  This article will go over 12 ways to boost testosterone levels naturally through healthy lifestyle measures.
Tribulus is a herb used in China and India for many centuries, mainly for it’s libido enhancing properties and supposed testosterone boosting properties. It enhances testosterone levels by increasing luteinizing hormone (LH) levels. LH is responsible for “telling” the body to produce testosterone. This herb contains Dioscin, protodioscin, diosgenin. These three organic component stimulate sexual performance and may be useful for a variety of sexual disorders such as low testosterone, low sexual energy and weak erections.
Results from the clinical trial demonstrated that there were significant increases in hemoglobin in both men with unexplained anemia as well as men with anemia from known causes who used the testosterone gel. These results may be of clinical value, and testosterone treatment could be used to boost hemoglobin levels in men more than 65 who have unexplained anemia and low testosterone. However, more research needs to be done.

Results from the clinical trial demonstrated that there were significant increases in hemoglobin in both men with unexplained anemia as well as men with anemia from known causes who used the testosterone gel. These results may be of clinical value, and testosterone treatment could be used to boost hemoglobin levels in men more than 65 who have unexplained anemia and low testosterone. However, more research needs to be done.
You should also know that a lot of people are deficient in Vitamin D. In the USA & many other western regions in the world, vitamin D deficiency is at epidemic proportions. The best way to increase your D levels is sun exposure. You only need 20-30 minutes of exposure to a large amount of skin (i.e., take your shirt off and go for a walk during the day).
Hi Douglas, this is a great question, thanks for reaching out. Apart from having a solid training plan that’s suited to your current level of fitness, and goals, you can also use a quality Testosterone Booster which could give you the lift you need to get back into the gym. If you find it difficult to swallow tablets, you can always empty the capsule into a glass of water, juice, or coffee to make it easier to take.
Oral/buccal (by mouth). The buccal dose comes in a patch that you place above your incisor (canine or "eyetooth"). The medication looks like a tablet but you should not chew or swallow it. The drug is released over 12 hours. This method has fewer harmful side effects on the liver than if the drug is swallowed, but it may cause headaches or cause irritation where you place it.

Testosterone fluctuates according to age and life circumstance, often plummeting at the onset of parenthood, and spiking (for some) during moments of triumph. Romantic relationships, too, can impact a person’s testosterone production; though the reasons are still not fully understood, entering a relationship tends to increase women’s testosterone levels, while decreasing men’s. Since males produce significantly more testosterone than females—about 20 times more each day—females can be more sensitive to these fluctuations. High levels of testosterone, particularly in men, have been correlated with a greater likelihood of getting divorced or engaging in extramarital affairs, though a causal link has not been established.
Sharma, R., Oni, O. A., Gupta, K., Chen, G., Sharma, M., Dawn, B., … & Barua, R. S. (2015, August 6). Normalization of testosterone level is associated with reduced incidence of myocardial infarction. European Heart Journal, 36(40), 2706-2715. Retrieved from https://academic.oup.com/eurheartj/article/36/40/2706/2293361/Normalization-of-testosterone-level-is-associated
×