This has become a common practice despite an Institute of Medicine (IOM) report issued in 2003, indicating insufficient evidence of any benefit derived from testosterone hormone therapy to address expected symptoms of male aging.4  These studies, and 2 others (to be presented in a separate EW research brief) come on the heels of research on the efficacy of prescribing testosterone5 that appeared in the NEJM last year.

Cross-sectional studies conducted at the time of diagnosis of BPH have failed to show consistent differences in testosterone levels between patients and controls. A prospective study also failed to demonstrate a correlation between testosterone and the development of BPH (Gann et al 1995). Clinical trials have shown that testosterone treatment of hypogonadal men does cause growth of the prostate, but only to the size seen in normal men, and also causes a small increase in prostate specific antigen (PSA) within the normal range (Rhoden and Morgentaler 2005). Despite growth of the prostate a number of studies have failed to detect any adverse effects on symptoms of urinary obstruction or physiological measurements such as flow rates and residual volumes (Snyder et al 1999; Kenny et al 2000, 2001). Despite the lack of evidence linking symptoms of BPH to testosterone treatment, it remains important to monitor for any new or deteriorating problems when commencing patients on testosterone treatment, as the small growth of prostate tissue may adversely affect a certain subset of individuals.


Ginger rhizome powder was reported to posses an antioxidant and androgenic activity in doses of 50 mg/kg and 100 mg/kg daily [1]. Ginger administration significantly increased serum testosterone levels at 100 mg/kg [1]. There was also an increases in testosterone at 50 mg/kg daily but it failed to reach statistical significance [1]. A study by Kamtchouing et al. [2] also reported significantly increased serum and testicular testosterone levels as well as increase in weight of the testis and testicular cholesterol level in healthy rats. Another study using doses of 500 mg/kg and 1000 mg/kg indicated that extract of Zingiber officinale possesses pro-fertility properties [3]. Compared with the controls there was a dose and duration dependent increases in the serum testosterone levels and seminal quality [3]. At a very high dose (2000 mg/kg for 35 days), ginger led to slightly reduced weights of testes which might be due to negative feedback reaction from androgenic activity [4]. Combination of ginger and zinc appears to further increase testosterone in rats [24].
Benefits: Tongkat Ali works by stimulating the pituitary glands and hypothalamus glands to produce natural testosterone past it’s peak. It also blocks excessive cortisol production. Cortisol turns excessive testosterone into estrogen. Ingredients in the Tongkat ali allows the body to produce testosterone at a steady rate to increase free testosterone while lowering cortisol.
Short bursts of timed intense activity — known as high-intensity interval training or HIIT — trigger the body to make more testosterone than less-than-intense aerobic or endurance exercise, says La Puma. Spurts of activity stimulate androgen-sensitive tissue, he explains, which tells the body to make more testosterone. Strength training has also been shown to increase testosterone.
Men who have prostate cancer or breast cancer should not take testosterone replacement therapy. Nor should men who have severe urinary tract problems, untreated severe sleep apnea or uncontrolled heart failure. All men considering testosterone replacement therapy should undergo a thorough prostate cancer screening -- a rectal exam and PSA test -- prior to starting this therapy.
Testosterone is significantly correlated with aggression and competitive behaviour and is directly facilitated by the latter. There are two theories on the role of testosterone in aggression and competition.[81] The first one is the challenge hypothesis which states that testosterone would increase during puberty thus facilitating reproductive and competitive behaviour which would include aggression.[81] Thus it is the challenge of competition among males of the species that facilitates aggression and violence.[81] Studies conducted have found direct correlation between testosterone and dominance especially among the most violent criminals in prison who had the highest testosterone levels.[81] The same research also found fathers (those outside competitive environments) had the lowest testosterone levels compared to other males.[81]
55+ million men in america between 40 and 70 years of age is a large enough group to warrant interest in a thorough study of the aged male delivery system and other sex related issues. There is a good chance there are 55 million women out there wishing for some kind of help also. Those are significant numbers, about 1/3 of the total population and the lions share of the income producers. And the best the medical community can do is speculate at the real cause for a significant cancer? Perhaps prostate cancer is the real cause of global warming, there is no real science unless there is a real paycheck?
Testosterone decreases body fat. Testosterone plays an important role in regulating insulin, glucose, and fat metabolism. As our T levels decrease, our body’s ability to regulate insulin, glucose, and fat metabolism decreases, which in turn causes adipose tissue (i.e. fat) to begin accumulating. To add insult to injury, that increased adipose tissue may also contribute to further decreasing testosterone levels because it converts testosterone into estrogen.
Cross-sectional studies have found a positive association between serum testosterone and some measures of cognitive ability in men (Barrett-Connor, Goodman-Gruen et al 1999; Yaffe et al 2002). Longitudinal studies have found that free testosterone levels correlate positively with future cognitive abilities and reduced rate of cognitive decline (Moffat et al 2002) and that, compared with controls, testosterone levels are reduced in men with Alzheimer’s disease at least 10 years prior to diagnosis (Moffat et al 2004). Studies of the effects of induced androgen deficiency in patients with prostate cancer have shown that profoundly lowering testosterone leads to worsening cognitive functions (Almeida et al 2004; Salminen et al 2004) and increased levels of serum amyloid (Gandy et al 2001; Almeida et al 2004), which is central to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease (Parihar and Hemnani 2004). Furthermore, testosterone reduces amyloid-induced hippocampal neurotoxity in vitro (Pike 2001) as well as exhibiting other neuroprotective effects (Pouliot et al 1996). The epidemiological and experimental data propose a potential role of testosterone in protecting cognitive function and preventing Alzheimer’s disease.
You can find a whole bunch of HIIT workouts online, but the one I used during my 90-day experiment was a simple wind sprint routine. On Tuesdays I went to the football field near my house, marked off 40 yards with some cones, and sprinted as fast as I could. I’d slowly walk back to the starting line, giving my body about a minute to rest, and then I’d sprint again. I typically did 40 sets of 40-yard sprints in a workout. I love sprints.
Miscellaneous: Sleep: (REM sleep) increases nocturnal testosterone levels.[146] Behavior: Dominance challenges can, in some cases, stimulate increased testosterone release in men.[147] Drugs: Natural or man-made antiandrogens including spearmint tea reduce testosterone levels.[148][149][150] Licorice can decrease the production of testosterone and this effect is greater in females.[151]
Epidemiological data has associated low testosterone levels with atherogenic lipid parameters, including lower HDL cholesterol (Lichtenstein et al 1987; Haffner et al 1993; Van Pottelbergh et al 2003) and higher total cholesterol (Haffner et al 1993; Van Pottelbergh et al 2003), LDL cholesterol (Haffner et al 1993) and triglyceride levels (Lichtenstein et al 1987; Haffner et al 1993). Furthermore, these relationships are independent of other factors such as age, obesity and glucose levels (Haffner et al 1993; Van Pottelbergh et al 2003). Interventional trails of testosterone replacement have shown that treatment causes a decrease in total cholesterol. A recent meta-analysis of 17 randomized controlled trials confirmed this and found that the magnitude of changes was larger in trials of patients with lower baseline testosterone levels (Isidori et al 2005). The same meta-analysis found no significant overall change in LDL or HDL cholesterol levels but in trials with baseline testosterone levels greater than 10 nmol/l, there was a small reduction in HDL cholesterol with testosterone treatment.
In high-fat high-furctose fed rats, ginger neutralized diet induced impairment in glucose regulation, dyslipidemia, and oxidative stress [28]. This observed anti-diabetic activity of ginger powder is credited to two active components: 6-paradol and 6-shogaol [29]. They both exhibit potent activity in stimulating glucose utilization by 3T3-L1 adipocytes and C2C12 myotubes. In the high-fat diet mouse model, 6-paradol decreased blood glucose, cholesterol and body weight.

Ginger is considered a safe herbal medicine with only few and insignificant adverse/side effects [1]. Some minor adverse effects such as mild diarrhea have been associated with the use of ginger in humans [19]. Ginger may also cause heartburn and at much higher doses act as a gastric irritant [19]. One study carried out on male diabetic rats concluded that extracts of Zingiber officinale have high safety and intake of Zingiber officinale roots as a drink may be useful for diabetic patients who suffer from sexual impotency [20].
Sharma, R., Oni, O. A., Gupta, K., Chen, G., Sharma, M., Dawn, B., … & Barua, R. S. (2015, August 6). Normalization of testosterone level is associated with reduced incidence of myocardial infarction. European Heart Journal, 36(40), 2706-2715. Retrieved from https://academic.oup.com/eurheartj/article/36/40/2706/2293361/Normalization-of-testosterone-level-is-associated
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