Testosterone is a steroid from the androstane class containing a keto and hydroxyl groups at the three and seventeen positions respectively. It is biosynthesized in several steps from cholesterol and is converted in the liver to inactive metabolites.[5] It exerts its action through binding to and activation of the androgen receptor.[5] In humans and most other vertebrates, testosterone is secreted primarily by the testicles of males and, to a lesser extent, the ovaries of females. On average, in adult males, levels of testosterone are about 7 to 8 times as great as in adult females.[6] As the metabolism of testosterone in males is greater, the daily production is about 20 times greater in men.[7][8] Females are also more sensitive to the hormone.[9]

There are two keys to incorporating fat in your diet: getting enough fat, and getting the right kinds of it. A study from 1984 (done, no doubt, with Big Brother watching) looked at 30 healthy men who switched from eating 40% fat (much of it saturated) to 25% fat (much of it unsaturated), with more protein and carbs to make up the difference in calories. After 6 weeks, their average serum testosterone, free testosterone, and 4-androstenedione (an important hormone for testosterone synthesis) all dropped significantly [6]. I think getting 40% of your calories from fat is too little – I recommend 50-70% of calories from fat, or even more in some cases.
Most men report being able to lose body fat and gain lean muscle more easily when they take testosterone boosters. These supplements can also raise a man’s mood and make him feel more confident. You might notice that your libido gets a boost, too. They make workouts more effective and, in some cases, easier. Testosterone boosters are also great for men with low testosterone levels, as they will combat the low energy and fatigue that go along with low levels. Other supplements to consider are energy-boosting supplements and pre-workout supplements.

Studies of the effects on cognition of testosterone treatment in non-cognitively impaired eugonadal and hypogonadal ageing males have shown varying results, with some showing beneficial effects on spatial cognition (Janowsky et al 1994; Cherrier et al 2001), verbal memory (Cherrier et al 2001) and working memory (Janowsky et al 2000), and others showing no effects (Sih et al 1997; Kenny et al 2002). Other trials have examined the effects of testosterone treatment in older men with Alzheimer’s disease or cognitive decline. Results have been promising, with two studies showing beneficial effects of testosterone treatment on spatial and verbal memory (Cherrier et al 2005b) and cognitive assessments including visual-spatial memory (Tan and Pu 2003), and a recent randomized controlled trial comparing placebo versus testosterone versus testosterone and an aromatase inhibitor suggesting that testosterone treatment improves spatial memory directly and verbal memory after conversion to estrogen (Cherrier et al 2005a). Not all studies have shown positive results (Kenny et al 2004; Lu et al 2005), and variations could be due to the different measures of cognitive abilities that were used and the cognitive state of men at baseline. The data from clinical trials offers evidence that testosterone may be beneficial for certain elements of cognitive function in the aging male with or without cognitive decline. Larger studies are needed to confirm and clarify these effects.


In my late 20’s, I visited an anti-aging doctor who was one of the pioneers of what we now call functional medicine. I got a full hormone test. Shockingly, my testosterone was lower than my mother’s. No wonder I felt crappy and was overweight. My other sex hormones were out of whack too, especially my estrogen levels. They were high because the little testosterone I did make my body converted into estrogen. I went on a mix of topical replacement testosterone cream, plus small doses of pharmaceuticals like clomid and arimidex in order to keep my other sex hormones functioning properly.
On review of the patient’s history, he was found to have undergone laboratory tests before starting to use the aforementioned testosterone booster product. All blood parameters (testosterone hormone and full chemical profile) before product intake were in the normal range. A physical examination that included blood pressure and pulse assessments showed nothing out of the ordinary, and the man appeared to be in good condition before product consumption. After that medical checkup, the athlete began to consume the product for 42 continuous days divided into 2 cycles (each cycle comprised 24 days). The daily dose was a single pack of Universal Nutrition Animal Stak (ingredients are listed in Table 1), following the exact direction of the manufacturing company hoping to get the best results.
One more thing that I have experienced from getting injected T is that my testicles have shrunk and they have shrunk quite a good amount. I would say that my testicles are about half the size they were just 4 months ago. This is a result that many men get when they get T injections. I have a buddy who also gets injections and his testicles have shrunk a good amount as well. It’s not a bid deal overall as I am 51yrs old and things like that are not bother. However, I do miss feeling/having larger testicles when I catch a glimpse in the mirror or “adjust” my private parts and I can feel less there. 🙂
“I'm a truck driver and for 13 hours a night I sit in my truck and I drive. Out of boredom, I'd stop and eat. That was all until Andro400 – ever since then my life has changed. I started out weighing 341 pounds, and since taking Andro400 I've dropped 85 pounds! There's no cravings – I actually don't even think about food anymore. One thing that Andro400 said on the radio ad is it attacks belly fat – well let me tell you it did – the 2nd month is where I saw a drastic change in the size of my stomach. I've lost 6 inches! I'm sleeping better. My knee pain went away. I've had some lower back issues and that went away, and I can only attribute that to Andro400. It's a Life Changer for me!”
Sexual arousal - boosting testosterone can improve sexual arousal, even if you have normal testosterone levels. Higher levels of testosterone can make it easier for you to get aroused and can boost your sex drive generally. While this doesn’t affect the physical action of your erections, if you are not getting hard because you’re not aroused then boosting testosterone could help.
There is a large body of evidence linking the onset and/or progression of cardiovascular disease to low testosterone levels in men. It is now apparent that an increased cardiovascular risk and accelerated development of atherosclerosis occurs not only in elderly men or men with obesity or type 2 diabetes mellitus, but also in non-obese men with hypogonadism.14 Current best evidence from systematic review of randomized controlled trials suggests that testosterone use in hypogonadal men is relatively safe in terms of cardiovascular health and do not produce unfavorable elevations in blood pressure or glycemic control, and does not adversely effect lipid profiles.4,15

Advanced BCAA’s are made from a hydrolyzed whey protein isolate.  Its 100% whey protein really.  But the amazing thing about this hydrolyzed whey isolate is that it is a whopping 50% BCAA!  Incredible really.  A pre digested whey protein that is 50% BCAA.  Normally hydrolyzed whey protein is only 30% BCAA.  Thus for every 10 grams of Advanced BCAA you are getting 5 grams of pre-digested BCAA peptides.  NOT free form amino acids from China.  Why is this so exciting and valuable to your bodybuilding goals?


12)  Use Aswaghanda and Collagen Protein:  This adaptogenic herb has been shown to reduce stress hormone, increase DHEA and boost testosterone levels.  You can take the Cortisol Defense to help you get restorative sleep at night which will support your testosterone.  In addition, I personally enjoy using the Organic Bone Broth Collagen in addition to the Amino Strong for a post weight training shake.  This protein powder has all the benefits of collagen protein and it has 500 mg of high potency ashwagandha in each serving!
In addition, the gel forms of testosterone, applied under your arm or on your upper arm and shoulder, can be transferred to others if you don’t wash the area after applying it. Children exposed to the hormone have experienced enlargement of the penis or clitoris, growth of pubic hair, increased libido, and aggressive behavior. Women can experience acne and the growth of body hair and, if they are pregnant or breastfeeding, can transfer the hormone to their babies.
The T Trials will serve as a prelude to lengthier and more robust trials in the future. More results from the T Trials are now coming in and overall results were mixed, with testosterone replacement associated with some benefits and some risks. More research needs to be done to figure out the balance of these potential benefits and risks as well as the precise clinical utility of testosterone treatment.
The authors reported statistically significant increases in both noncalcified and total coronary artery plaque in patients receiving testosterone treatment. Participants’ coronary artery calcium scores, another measure of calcified plaque, were not significantly affected by testosterone treatment. Although these results are potentially a cause for concern, additional studies are required to determine the clinical relevance of this increase in plaque volume.
The Prime Labs Men’s Testosterone Booster made our top spot for testosterone booster caplets. These natural testosterone supplements improve the symptoms of low testosterone, which include low energy, a lack of stamina, a low sex drive, and a decrease in strength. The results include improvement in all of the above and the can also boost your overall mood, making you feel more confident and in control.
Currently available testosterone preparations in common use include intramuscular injections, subcutaneous pellets, buccal tablets, transdermal gels and patches (see Table 2). Oral testosterone is not widely used. Unmodified testosterone taken orally is largely subject to first-pass metabolism by the liver. Oral doses 100 fold greater than physiological testosterone production can be given to achieve adequate serum levels. Methyl testosterone esters have been associated with hepatotoxicity. There has been some use of testosterone undecanoate, which is an esterified derivative of testosterone that is absorbed via the lymphatic system and bypasses the liver. Unfortunately, it produces unpredictable testosterone levels and increases testosterone levels for only a short period after each oral dose (Schurmeyer et al 1983).

Epidemiological evidence supports a link between testosterone and glucose metabolism. Studies in non-diabetic men have found an inverse correlation of total or free testosterone with glucose and insulin levels (Simon et al 1992; Haffner et al 1994) and studies show lower testosterone levels in patients with the metabolic syndrome (Laaksonen et al 2003; Muller et al 2005; Kupelian et al 2006) or diabetes (Barrett-Connor 1992; Andersson et al 1994; Rhoden et al 2005). A study of patients with type 2 diabetes using measurement of serum free testosterone by the gold standard method of equilibrium dialysis, found a 33% prevalence of biochemical hypogonadism (Dhindsa et al 2004). The Barnsley study demonstrated a high prevalence of clinical and biochemical hypogonadism with 19% having total testosterone levels below 8 nmol/l and a further 25% between 8–12 nmol/l (Kapoor, Aldred et al 2007). There are also a number longitudinal studies linking low serum testosterone levels to the future development of the metabolic syndrome (Laaksonen et al 2004) or type 2 diabetes (Haffner et al 1996; Tibblin et al 1996; Stellato et al 2000; Oh et al 2002; Laaksonen et al 2004), indicating a possible role of hypogonadism in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes in men. Alternatively, it has been postulated that obesity may be the common link between low testosterone levels and insulin resistance, diabetes and cardiovascular disease (Phillips et al 2003; Kapoor et al 2005). With regard to this hypothesis, study findings vary as to whether the association of testosterone with diabetes occurs independently of obesity (Haffner et al 1996; Laaksonen et al 2003; Rhoden et al 2005).
Overall, it seems that both estrogen and testosterone are important for normal bone growth and maintenance. Deficiency or failure of action of the sex hormones is associated with osteoporosis and minimal trauma fractures. Estrogen in males is produced via metabolism of testosterone by aromatase and it is therefore important that androgens used for the treatment of hypogonadism be amenable to the action of aromatase to yield maximal positive effects on bone. There is data showing that testosterone treatment increases bone mineral density in aging males but that these benefits are confined to hypogonadal men. The magnitude of this improvement is greater in the spine than in the hip and further studies are warranted to confirm or refute any differential effects of testosterone at these important sites. Improvements seen in randomized controlled trials to date may underestimate true positive effects due to relatively short duration and/or baseline characteristics of the patients involved. There is no data as yet to confirm that the improvement in bone density with testosterone treatment reduces fractures in men and this is an important area for future study.
While steroids like DHEA can be used to boost testosterone, if used in the wrong dosages or by people who don’t need them they can raise T-levels far beyond the normal range, which is what causes accelerated muscle gain. According to Dr. Emil Hodzovic, who is a competitive bodybuilder as well as a doctor with Medichecks, steroids come with “a set of risks, including liver damage, hormone imbalance, high blood pressure, and a higher risk of a stroke or heart attack”.
Testosterone may decrease your chances of Alzheimer’s Disease. Several studies have linked low testosterone levels to an increased risk of Alzheimer’s disease.  In a 2010 study by the University of Hong Kong, researchers studied 153 Chinese men who were recruited from social centers. They were at least 55 years and older, lived in the community, and didn’t have dementia. Of those men, 47 had mild cognitive impairment — or problems with clear thinking and memory loss.

Herein lies the problem.  DHT is an extremely powerful androgen, significantly more potent than testosterone.  Somehow, fenugreek causes increases in muscle mass and libido while reducing DHT.  I often argue on the site that it is not exactly increased testosterone that you want.  You want the blessings of a high testosterone level: physical fitness, libido, and high energy levels.  If fenugreek can bestow these upon you, why do you need the testosterone?
There have been case reports of development of prostate cancer in patients during treatment with testosterone, including one case series of twenty patients (Gaylis et al 2005). It is not known whether this reflects an increase in incidence, as prostate cancer is very common and because the monitoring for cancer in patients treated with testosterone is greater. Randomized controlled trials of testosterone treatment have found a low incidence of prostate cancer and they do not provide evidence of a link between testosterone treatment and the development of prostate cancer (Rhoden and Morgentaler 2004). More large scale clinical trials of longer durations of testosterone replacement are required to confirm that testosterone treatment does not cause prostate cancer. Overall, it is not known whether testosterone treatment of aging males with hypogonadism increases the risk of prostate cancer, but monitoring for the condition is clearly vital. This should take the form of PSA blood test and rectal examination every three months for the first year of treatment and yearly thereafter (Nieschlag et al 2005). Age adjusted PSA reference ranges should be used to identify men who require further assessment. The concept of PSA velocity is also important and refers to the rate of increase in PSA per year. Patients with abnormal rectal examination suggestive of prostate cancer, PSA above the age specific reference range or a PSA velocity greater than 0.75 ng/ml/yr should be referred to a urologist for consideration of prostate biopsy.
Our clients love the results and energy they’ve get once their hormonal levels are fully balanced. Because hormones are so important, we’re proud to lend our medical expertise to ensure all our hormonal treatments are tailored to your specific needs. If you’re curious about NHT, you can take a short quiz to see if NHT would be a good fit for your body.
I am 50 yrs old. I tried to go the route my urologist provide of 50mgs of injectable test weekly. No man can live on that dose. For the past five years I have self administered injectable cyponate at the rate of 250 mgs to 750 mgs weekly. Non stop , no breaks. I have polycythemia from these injections. I give blood every 8 weeks to combat this. I have administered 10 X the recommended dose with no bad side effects. I get full blood work done yearly. Doctors are so scared they will get sued if something happens that they wont give you enough. Its a shame.
D-Aspartic acid is a natural amino acid involved in the synthesis and release of testosterone, which research shows can be used as a testosterone booster for infertile men. One 90-day study gave D-Aspartic acid to men with impaired sperm production, and found their sperm count rose from 8.2 million sperm per ml to 16.5 million sperm per ml, more than a 100 per cent increase.

Finally, there's the question of prostate cancer risk. Research over the past few decades has shown little evidence of a link between testosterone replacement therapy and prostate cancer. However, the question has not been entirely laid to rest. Eisenberg recommends that his testosterone replacement therapy patients get a PSA test once or twice a year to check for possible signs of concern.
The FDA approved testosterone therapy only for men having a low testosterone (hypogonadism) as the result of a diagnosed medical condition (ie, genetic defects), or as a side effect of cancer chemotherapy.3 However, testosterone frequently has been prescribed off-label to men who have had no diagnosed medical condition, other than an age-related decrease in circulating testosterone, also known as “low T”.
Leafy green vegetables such as spinach are rich sources of folic acid. Low levels of folate can give rise to distorted sperm shapes such as ones with two heads or two tails. The sperm are also at an increased risk of chromosomal abnormalities. This means that firstly your sperm will find it difficult to reach an egg and even if it does reach an egg, it will not be able to fertilize it. Furthermore, even if these sperms are able to fertilize an egg, the chances of birth defects are quite high in such cases.
Grape seed extract is another ingredient with not enough research to suggest a dosage. Grape seed extract can interact with drugs like “blood thinners, NSAID painkillers (like aspirin, Advil, and Aleve), certain heart medicines, cancer treatments, and others.” If this sounds like you (or if you ever pop an Advil to clear off a headache), you’ll need to speak with a doctor to make sure this supplement is safe to take.
How to Get Rid of Loose Skin After Weight Loss The Ultimate Shoulder Workout: The Best Shoulder Exercises for Big Delts The Ultimate Arms Workout: The Best Arm Exercises for Big Guns The Best Chest Workouts for Building Awesome Pecs (According to Science) How to Build Muscle and Lose Fat…at the Same Time The Ultimate Back Workout: The Best Back Exercises for a Thick, Wide Back
I was reading in the university health news daily website that a study performed by researchers at the University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center found that men with prostate cancer who ate 3 tablespoons of milled or ground flax seeds each day had decreased prostate cancer cell proliferation compared to similar men who did not eat flax seeds. According to the American Cancer Society, men who supplement their diets with flax seed have lower PSA levels and slower growth of benign as well as cancerous prostate cells.
Hi.i have a simple question…I AM 60 YEARS OLD and my free testosterone is 7… and my regular testosterone is 700+…I really need TRT …and in case yes i need it the doctor said if i start i need to do it for the rest of my life !!! he said is not coming back!!! ..i don’t know is true or not??? With my testosterone levels i need or not to do TRT???..i am going in gym daily and i feel good in general …all my blood results are perfect …///Again if i take the TRT will help me in general ??or is better to not use the “TRT”..Thank you for your time to answer HONEST for my question ..I ask this because i don’t know what to do ..i don’t want to do something wrong???…!!!..ps .if is possible to answer me on my email ..Thank you v v much and GOD BLESS YOU …Chris…R…
While testosterone stimulates a man’s sex drive, it also aids in achieving and maintaining an erection. Testosterone alone doesn’t cause an erection, but it stimulates receptors in the brain to produce nitric oxide. Nitric oxide is a molecule that helps trigger a series of chemical reactions necessary for an erection to occur. When testosterone levels are too low, a man may have difficulty achieving an erection prior to sex or having spontaneous erections (for example, during sleep).
Hi Douglas, this is a great question, thanks for reaching out. Apart from having a solid training plan that’s suited to your current level of fitness, and goals, you can also use a quality Testosterone Booster which could give you the lift you need to get back into the gym. If you find it difficult to swallow tablets, you can always empty the capsule into a glass of water, juice, or coffee to make it easier to take.
Testosterone levels peak by early adulthood and drop as you age—about 1% to 2% a year beginning in the 40s. As men reach their 50s and beyond, this may lead to signs and symptoms, such as impotence or changes in sexual desire, depression or anxiety, reduced muscle mass, less energy, weight gain, anemia, and hot flashes. While falling testosterone levels are a normal part of aging, certain conditions can hasten the decline. These include:
Hooper, D. R., Kraemer, W. J., Saenz, C., Schill, K. E., Focht, B. C., Volek, J. S. … Maresh, C. M. (2017, July). The presence of symptoms of testosterone deficiency in the exercise-hypogonadal male condition and the role of nutrition [Abstract]. European Journal of Applied Physiology, 117(7), 1349–1357. Retrieved from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28470410

So, this past summer I talked with my doctor about starting T injections to see if that would work. I started injection 1 small bottle every 2 weeks. I started some time in later July, 2016. After around the 3 injection I had a blood test and my T level was OVER 800, something like 832. Apparently, my body reacted and took to it very quickly and easily, but the T level was now TOO high. So, I extended the injection interval to 18 days instead of 15 days. I just had another blood test last week and my T level was in the mid 600’s. It’s better now, but my doctor and I want to get that down to around 500, so I’m going to 20-21 days and see what happens.
Alphamax XT’s testosterone boosting formula is so potent that they had to include an estrogen blocker in the formula. User’s have reported that the product’s effects rivals a hardcore pre-workout in terms of aggression and intensity. When the workout is done user’s have also been reporting accelerated muscle recovery, fat loss, and increased muscle definition.
The reliable measurement of serum free testosterone requires equilibrium dialysis. This is not appropriate for clinical use as it is very time consuming and therefore expensive. The amount of bioavailable testosterone can be measured as a percentage of the total testosterone after precipitation of the SHBG bound fraction using ammonium sulphate. The bioavailable testosterone is then calculated from the total testosterone level. This method has an excellent correlation with free testosterone (Tremblay and Dube 1974) but is not widely available for clinical use. In most clinical situations the available tests are total testosterone and SHBG which are both easily and reliably measured. Total testosterone is appropriate for the diagnosis of overt male hypogonadism where testosterone levels are very low and also in excluding hypogonadism in patients with normal/high-normal testosterone levels. With increasing age, a greater number of men have total testosterone levels just below the normal range or in the low-normal range. In these patients total testosterone can be an unreliable indicator of hypogonadal status. There are a number of formulae that calculate an estimated bioavailable or free testosterone level using the SHBG and total testosterone levels. Some of these have been shown to correlate well with laboratory measures and there is evidence that they more reliably indicate hypogonadism than total testosterone in cases of borderline biochemical hypogonadism (Vermeulen et al 1971; Morris et al 2004). It is important that such tests are validated for use in patient populations relevant to the patient under consideration.
The body’s endocrine system consists of glands that manufacture hormones. The hypothalamus, located in the brain, tells the pituitary gland how much testosterone the body needs. The pituitary gland then sends the message to the testicles. Most testosterone is produced in the testicles, but small amounts come from the adrenal glands, which are located just above the kidneys. In women, the adrenal glands and ovaries produce small amounts of testosterone.
I had been on testosterone cyperonate 250-300 mg every 2 weeeksfor one year when diagnosed as having hypercythemic. I was cut of treatments immediately. Scanned from head to toe side to side. All clear. My urologist refuses to resume any HRT as my total testosterone is 701 immunoassay. However, he never mentions my Free % T value of 1.3. The labs range is 1.6-2.9. SHGB =70.6. Albumin 4.1. Is not the Free T we should be concerned with? Do I not need to go “Uologist Hunting”????
When I told people that I was doing an experiment to increase my testosterone, the question that people would invariably ask in hushed tones was, “So, did it, you know, improve your sex life?” Honestly, I didn’t see too much change. I had a robust and healthy sex life before the experiment and continued to do so afterwards. I guess I was a bit more randier than usual, but not much. I’d imagine if you had been suffering from low T for a long time and took steps to increase it, you’d likely see improvement in the bedroom department.

Testosterone is an anabolic steroid hormone that plays a critical role in metabolism, sex drive, muscle building, mood regulation, memory & cognitive function.  Normal testosterone levels play a huge role in maintaining optimal weight as well as reducing risk of degenerative diseases such as osteoporosis, heart disease, diabetes, & certain cancers (1, 2, 3).
^ Southren AL, Gordon GG, Tochimoto S, Pinzon G, Lane DR, Stypulkowski W (May 1967). "Mean plasma concentration, metabolic clearance and basal plasma production rates of testosterone in normal young men and women using a constant infusion procedure: effect of time of day and plasma concentration on the metabolic clearance rate of testosterone". The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism. 27 (5): 686–94. doi:10.1210/jcem-27-5-686. PMID 6025472.

If you have low testosterone and are prescribed testosterone therapy by your doctor, it does not increase your risk for getting prostate cancer. However, in some patients with existing prostate cancer, adding testosterone hormone therapy can make the cancer grow faster. Men with low testosterone levels are actually more likely to get prostate cancer than men with normal prostate levels. You need to discuss these details with your physician and make the best decision for you.

So much to say, take a look at excelmale.com. it is a resource for men like us that give answers, science and dialogue which addresses our questions. It’s a great resource for men like us. Also, I would say to eliminate blue light before bed from tv and pc screens. Simply use blue light blocking glasses or F.lux from the play store. Also get outside in the sun in the AM. The goal is to restore the circadian rhythm which impacts hormone productiion.
The sex hormone testosterone is far more than just the stuff of the alpha male's swagger. Though it plays a more significant role in the life of the biological male, it is actually present in both sexes to some degree. Despite popular perceptions that testosterone primarily controls aggression and sex drive—although it does play a role in both of those things—research has shown that individual levels of testosterone are also correlated with our language skills and cognitive abilities. Testosterone occurs in the body naturally, but can be administered as a medication, too: its most common uses are in the treatment of hypogonadism and breast cancer, as well as in hormone therapy for transgender men.
A large number of trials have demonstrated a positive effect of testosterone treatment on bone mineral density (Katznelson et al 1996; Behre et al 1997; Leifke et al 1998; Snyder et al 2000; Zacharin et al 2003; Wang, Cunningham et al 2004; Aminorroaya et al 2005; Benito et al 2005) and bone architecture (Benito et al 2005). These effects are often more impressive in longer trials, which have shown that adequate replacement will lead to near normal bone density but that the full effects may take two years or more (Snyder et al 2000; Wang, Cunningham et al 2004; Aminorroaya et al 2005). Three randomized placebo-controlled trials of testosterone treatment in aging males have been conducted (Snyder et al 1999; Kenny et al 2001; Amory et al 2004). One of these studies concerned men with a mean age of 71 years with two serum testosterone levels less than 12.1nmol/l. After 36 months of intramuscular testosterone treatment or placebo, there were significant increases in vertebral and hip bone mineral density. In this study, there was also a significant decrease in the bone resorption marker urinary deoxypyridinoline with testosterone treatment (Amory et al 2004). The second study contained men with low bioavailable testosterone levels and an average age of 76 years. Testosterone treatment in the form of transdermal patches was given for 1 year. During this trial there was a significant preservation of hip bone mineral density with testosterone treatment but testosterone had no effect on bone mineral density at other sites including the vertebrae. There were no significant alterations in bone turnover markers during testosterone treatment (Kenny et al 2001). The remaining study contained men of average age 73 years. Men were eligible for the study if their serum total testosterone levels were less than 16.5 nmol/L, meaning that the study contained men who would usually be considered eugonadal. The beneficial effects of testosterone on bone density were confined to the men who had lower serum testosterone levels at baseline and were seen only in the vertebrae. There were no significant changes in bone turnover markers. Testosterone in the trial was given via scrotal patches for a 36 month duration (Snyder et al 1999). A recent meta-analysis of the effects on bone density of testosterone treatment in men included data from these studies and two other randomized controlled trials. The findings were that testosterone produces a significant increase of 2.7% in the bone mineral density at the lumber spine but no overall change at the hip (Isidori et al 2005). These results from randomized controlled trials in aging men show much smaller benefits of testosterone treatment on bone density than have been seen in other trials. This could be due to the trials including patients who are not hypogonadal and being too short to allow for the maximal effects of testosterone. The meta-analysis also assessed the data concerning changes of bone formation and resorption markers during testosterone treatment. There was a significant decrease in bone resorption markers but no change in markers of bone formation suggesting that reduction of bone resorption may be the primary mode of action of testosterone in improving bone density (Isidori et al 2005).
D-Aspartic acid is a natural amino acid involved in the synthesis and release of testosterone, which research shows can be used as a testosterone booster for infertile men. One 90-day study gave D-Aspartic acid to men with impaired sperm production, and found their sperm count rose from 8.2 million sperm per ml to 16.5 million sperm per ml, more than a 100 per cent increase.
My favorite overall tool to manage stress is EFT (Emotional Freedom Technique), which is like acupuncture without the needles. It's a handy, free tool for unloading emotional baggage quickly and painlessly, and so easy that even children can learn it. Other common stress-reduction tools with a high success rate include prayer, meditation, laughter and yoga, for example. Learning relaxation skills, such as deep breathing and positive visualization, which is the "language" of the subconscious.
Hello there Abraham. My doc and you know each other well. We reside in Richmond, VA. Doc told me to inject my weekly Cypionate into sub fat for longer absorption, with reference you shared this info him with him. I have been his TRT patient for 10 years now. He is the best. I wont mention names. Please point me to a study showing the results of testosterone absorption from fat.

Type 2 diabetes is an important condition in terms of morbidity and mortality, and the prevalence is increasing in the developed and developing world. The prevalence also increases with age. Insulin resistance is a primary pathological feature of type 2 diabetes and predates the onset of diabetes by many years, during which time raised serum insulin levels compensate and maintain normoglycemia. Insulin resistance and/or impaired glucose tolerance are also part of the metabolic syndrome which also comprises an abnormal serum lipid profile, central obesity and hypertension. The metabolic syndrome can be considered to be a pre-diabetic condition and is itself linked to cardiovascular mortality. Table 1 shows the three commonly used definitions of the metabolic syndrome as per WHO, NCEPIII and IDF respectively (WHO 1999; NCEPIII 2001; Zimmet et al 2005).
Testosterone replacement therapy can successfully treat erectile dysfunction and loss of libido in men with low testosterone from either advancing age or hypogonadism. Although the effects of increased testosterone are more dramatic in hypogonadal men there are also benefits to the libido of men with normal gonadal, also called eugonadal, function. In a 2004 study published in the "Journal of Endocrinology and Metabolism," researchers found that increasing peak testosterone levels to between 400 and 500 percent above baseline in subjects resulted in a significant increase in sexual arousability over placebo subjects.

MuscleTech Pro Series Alpha Test claims you’ll be able to see increases in free testosterone levels in as few as seven days. Its formula is supported by potent ingredients such as Fenugreek, Shilajit, and Boron Citrate. The formulation can also help increase lean muscle mass, strength, as well as overall performance and maintains a peak testosterone-to-cortisol ratio.


The participants were seen every 4 weeks. Blood was taken to measure hormone levels, and questionnaires were given to assess physical function, health status, vitality, and sexual function. Body fat and muscle measurements were also taken at the beginning and end of the 16 weeks. The study was funded in part by NIH’s National Institute on Aging (NIA) and National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK). Results appeared in the September 12, 2013, issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.
×