Jeff- I read your post and I can relate to your problem. Perhaps you’ve already received some help but I can tell you this much. I recovered from prostate cancer about 2 yrs ago. My oncologist is also a graduate of Harvard like the doc that wrote this article. He put me on Axiron about 8 months ago after I complained to him of symptoms similar to you. He has no concerns that the T will cause me to get prostate cancer again. I do my 4 month check ups and have my T tested at that time along with my PSA. Everything is normal so far. My T count was initially 50 and now I am in the low 300 range. The Axiron has gotten me back to normal and then some!! I’m 58 and I told him at my last appt that I feel like I’m 40.

After years of low libido,ED and just general lack of energy I found a urogist will to look at my symptoms. Turned out my testosterone level was 135 so I started on testosterone. Had a great improvement on everything I was having issues plus just a lot happier. My Dr. did PSA every 6 months and my PSA over almost 2 years went from 1.16 to 1.67, still pretty low for 56YOA He wanted to do a biopsy and he found 1 out of 12 cores 60%, GS3X3. I had an MRI and found a .5cm cancer, clean margins, perfectly round and dead center of the prostate.I’m doing active surviellance and the DR wants to start me on Finasteride and continue TRT. I like to believe that the years of low testosterone help the cancer to develope and the twice yearly testing of PSA by the doctor because of therapy caught it very early.I’m not too sure about TRT and Finasteride together.


In the early days of testosterone boosters, the ingredients used were not placed or based on clinical trials that proved the effectiveness of each of them. Most testosterone boosters were compiled with ingredients that were coming from the mouth of a bro scientist, so to speak. These ingredients had no real evidence to back their effects on testosterone production.

The science backs up the soldier’s self discovery, in fact, exposure to radiation (whether it’s from an army radar or the cell phone in your pocket, or the wifi router in your house) has been shown to lower sperm quality, fertility and testosterone. This is true not only for military personnel (88, 89,90) but all males living in a modern world (91).

One preliminary study by researchers from Tikrit University showed high statistically significant increase of serum hormones (p< 0.01) in infertile men [9]. After 30 week treatment serum testosterone has increased by 17,7%, serum luteinizing hormone by 43,2% and serum follicle-stimulating hormone by 17,6%; dosage of ginger used was not disclosed [9]. It is suggested that improved testosterone production is because ginger was shown to be effective in decreasing SDF (sperm DNA Fragmentation) in infertile men [22]. SDF is negatively correlated with testosterone levels [23].
Testosterone is a key hormone as it relates to both sexual drive and muscle growth. Testosterone boosters are meant to increase testosterone levels in the blood. Now while most healthy men under the age of 65 may not need a testosterone boosting supplement, it is true that testosterone levels decrease as we get older. That could lead to a host of things from a loss in muscle mass to problems performing in the bedroom. There are natural testosterone booster, however, and you should consider those to minimize potential side effects.
My entire presentation was focused on 32 different ways to increase testosterone naturally, with no injections or hormone replacement protocols required. I'm not against bioidentical hormone replacement therapy (BHRT), but I do think one should explore as many natural alternatives as possible first. Or, for even more bang for the buck, pair BHRT with the tactics you'll discover in this episode.

While steroids like DHEA can be used to boost testosterone, if used in the wrong dosages or by people who don’t need them they can raise T-levels far beyond the normal range, which is what causes accelerated muscle gain. According to Dr. Emil Hodzovic, who is a competitive bodybuilder as well as a doctor with Medichecks, steroids come with “a set of risks, including liver damage, hormone imbalance, high blood pressure, and a higher risk of a stroke or heart attack”.
A previous meta-analysis has confirmed that treatment of hypogonadal patients with testosterone improves erections compared to placebo (Jain et al 2000). A number of studies have investigated the effect of testosterone levels on erectile dysfunction in normal young men by inducing a hypogonadal state, for example by using a GnRH analogue, and then replacing testosterone at varying doses to produce levels ranging from low-normal to high (Buena et al 1993; Hirshkowitz et al 1997). These studies have shown no significant effects of testosterone on erectile function. These findings contrast with a similar study conducted in healthy men aged 60–75, showing that free testosterone levels achieved with treatment during the study correlate with overall sexual function, including morning erections, spontaneous erections and libido (Gray et al 2005). This suggests that the men in this older age group are particularly likely to suffer sexual symptoms if their testosterone is low. Furthermore, the severity of erectile dysfunction positively correlates with lower testosterone levels in men with type 2 diabetes (Kapoor, Clarke et al 2007).

Although some men believe that taking testosterone medications may help them feel younger and more vigorous as they age, few rigorous studies have examined testosterone therapy in men who have healthy testosterone levels. And some small studies have revealed mixed results. For example, in one study healthy men who took testosterone medications increased muscle mass but didn't gain strength.
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