Such sort of injuries varies in severity and extent of damage markedly from one person to the other and withdrawal of the drug/supplement coupled with proper medical attention suffice in terms of alleviating the symptoms.[8,12] This was observed in the present case. However, the liver injury observed here may not be confidently linked to product consumption as the subject later reported that the following recovery he consumed two more courses of the booster with no side effects. Tests performed following hospital discharge, and repeated use of the product showed AST and ALT to be slightly high, whereas the rest of the blood parameters tested appeared to be normal. The AST/ALT ratio is considered to be a very important parameter for the evaluation of liver diseases, such as non-alcoholic fatty liver disease,[13] though it is rarely considered alone. Overall, the evidence was inconclusive in the present work in terms of linking the use of a testosterone booster with liver injury. However, even though a single case report cannot establish causality with statistical power.[13] Further research on the usage of a commercial testosterone booster within large populations for a long period is necessary to investigate whether the symptoms shown in the present case were significantly present in other athletes consuming the same commercial product or not. To guarantee an optimal outcome with no severe side effects, further research is warranted to confirm the present findings and determine whether the effects observed in this case report would be statistically significant in larger samples.
Hello..was prescribe andro gel 1.62 for about 2 years..borderline low..At time 54 year old now 57..a year ago switched doctors..new doctor would not prescribe andro gel..without me stopping use and then being checked after 6 months..it’s been a year..by the way felt great while on it much more energy. .did notice some hair receding. .but felt stronger..my question is..by using andro gel ..did I turn off my body’s natural ability to make testosterone as using andro gel..if so what do I need to do too turn my body on if my doctor does not renew therapy. .by way the past without andro gel…little too no energy..weight gain of 40 lbs..especially around the belly..thank you for your time and reply
If you're a man who's experiencing symptoms such as decreased sex drive, erectile dysfunction, depressed mood, and difficulties with concentration and memory, and you think low testosterone may be to blame, you can have your levels tested. Since testosterone levels fluctuate throughout the day, you'll probably need more than a blood test to get a true picture of your levels.
Autopsy studies have found histological prostate cancer to be very common, with one series showing a prevalence of greater than fifty percent in men over age sixty (Holund 1980). The majority of histological cancers go undetected so that the clinical incidence of the disease is much lower, but it is still the most prevalent non-skin cancer in men (Jemal et al 2003). Prostate cancer is also unusual in comparison to other adult cancers in that the majority of those with the disease will die of other causes. Treatment of prostate cancer with androgen deprivation is known to be successful and is widely practiced, indicating an important role for testosterone in modifying the behavior of prostate cancer. In view of this, testosterone treatment is absolutely contraindicated in any case of known or suspected prostate cancer. The question of whether testosterone treatment could cause new cases of prostate cancer, or more likely cause progression of undiagnosed histological prostate cancer that would otherwise have remained occult, is an important consideration when treating ageing males with testosterone.
Testosterone replacement therapy is currently only FDA approved for men who have been diagnosed with hypogonadism, but it’s also prescribed off-label for older men who take it in hopes that it will improve their libido. The use of testosterone therapy is increasingly common in the United States, with more than 2 million men receiving the therapy. Not every man benefits from taking testosterone supplements. Testosterone is available in different forms, including topicals such as gels, creams, and patches; injections; and pellets that are surgically placed directly beneath the skin. (7)
Pine Pollen is an androgen, meaning in theory it can raise testosterone levels – effectively making it a naturally derived source of testosterone. Read more about this on the links below. But like I said I started taking it for a few weeks and did notice a bit more ‘up and go’ so to speak, but it did only last a few weeks. I have tried cycling it but haven’t noticed the same effects as I had when I initially started with it. I’m still experimenting and will keep this page updated. Therefore I recommend doing your own research.

Important future developments will include selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs). These drugs will be able to produce isolated effects of testosterone at androgen receptors. They are likely to become useful clinical drugs, but their initial worth may lie in facilitating research into the relative importance of testosterone’s action at the androgen receptor compared to at other sites or after conversion to other hormones. Testosterone will remain the treatment of choice for late onset hypogonadism for some time to come.


If your levels are indeed low, there are a number of synthetic and bioidentical testosterone products on the market, as well as DHEA, which is the most abundant androgen precursor prohormone in the human body, meaning that it is the largest raw material your body uses to produce other vital hormones, including testosterone in men and estrogen in women.

I am a 67 yo male diagnosed with prostate cancer gleason 6. I have a prescription on bicalutamide 50 mg a day since Nov 2016 and leuprolide 11,5 mg every 3 months. My testicles reduced their size to half it´s original size, my libido is almost zero. I went through a radiotherapy of 45 sessions; my PSA level went from 11.2 to 0.13 on my last test from Sept 2017 and the leuprolide injections are taken away from my prescription by my urologist. I am planning to take TRT with Testosterone mix called SUSTANON 250 mg per week and HCG 5000 IUs twice a month. Give me your thoughts please
Tarig Elraiyah, Mohamad Bassam Sonbol, Zhen Wang, Tagwa Khairalseed, Noor Asi, Chaitanya Undavalli, Mohammad Nabhan, Osama Altayar, Larry Prokop, Victor M. Montori, Mohammad Hassan Murad; The Benefits and Harms of Systemic Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) in Postmenopausal Women With Normal Adrenal Function: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis, The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism, Volume 99, Issue 10, 1 October 2014, Pages 3536–3542, https://doi.org/10.1210/jc.2014-2261
In this podcast, I will review the key biomarkers for achieving peak male health, along with the most potent and effective practices for optimizing biological variables for men's fertility and longevity. I will also unveil a host of little-known biohacks proven to enhance or restore peak testosterone and drive, along with how to practically implement a blend of ancestral wisdom and modern science to amplify sexual performance.

There are no studies showing its effects on healthy males, but it has been shown to drastically improve testosterone in infertile males (ref 77). It's also packed full of minerals, so is a great superfood nevertheless. I use the Sunfoods brand. Make sure you buy from a quality brand, as there are a lot of poor shilajit products out there, also some have been shown to be high in heavy metals. 


I have been on TRT for over 8 years now. I feel GREAT! I read all these studies, hear in the news, and see all these dumb lawsuit commercials about testosterone causing cardiovascular events, blood clots and many other things. If anyone takes the time to do the due diligence and read the studies the picture becomes very clear. Unless you monitor all the other hormones, specifically, Estradiol, DHT, Pregenolone, Total Testosterone, Free Direct Testosterone, and DHEAS you are playing a deadly game. The reason is you must give something to control the pathways of T conversion into estradiol and or DHT. The vast majority of the studies used nothing to control those pathways and they gave men way, way more T than they needed to start with. They also gave forms of T that are not acceptable. Especially the oral version.

Japanese Knotweed (a.k.a Hu Zhang or Polygonum cuspidatum) is highlighted by WebMD as needing more evidence to rate its effectiveness in a number of different areas: like treating constipation and liver or heart disease. They also warn that it can interact poorly with medications that are changed and broken down by the liver, and those that slow blood clotting (anticoagulants and antiplatelets).
Hacking your testosterone influences everything from body composition to energy levels to mood. It’s easy to eat more butter; it’s hard to visit a doctor and get tested, but that’s what I recommend: know your levels. If you’re 25, you’ll know what your target is when you’re 35. By the time you’ve noticed symptoms of low testosterone, it’s too late to get your “normal” measurements!
Testosterone is necessary for normal sperm development. It activates genes in Sertoli cells, which promote differentiation of spermatogonia. It regulates acute HPA (hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal axis) response under dominance challenge.[22] Androgen including testosterone enhances muscle growth. Testosterone also regulates the population of thromboxane A2 receptors on megakaryocytes and platelets and hence platelet aggregation in humans.[23][24]

Another benefit of the increased muscle mass was that I got stronger. My bench press, squat, and deadlift all enjoyed significant gains during my experiment. It’s great to be able to bench press 225 pounds again for 5 sets of 5 like I used to in high school, and I’m on track to beat my maxes on the bench and squat that my 18-year-old self set over 12 years ago.


The basis for my thinking that T levels could be boosted by cold baths came from a post I wrote a few years ago on the benefits of cold showers. One benefit I found in my research was that they could increase testosterone levels. I mentioned a 1993 study done by the Thrombosis Research Institute in England that found increased T levels after taking a cold shower. Here’s the thing. I can’t find a link to the original source and I can’t find any other studies that support this claim! So without supporting research, I’m unsure of the effects of cold showers on testosterone.
“About 2 weeks after starting Andro400, I noticed my belly fat disappearing. Now, after only one month, I've lost about ten pounds all in my mid section. What a miracle! I have more energy and don't have to hold my gut in any longer. I'm more relaxed and my libido has increased 5 fold! I'm 58 years old and beginning to feel like a teenager again! Your product has delivered exactly as advertised. I'm elated!”
Hello I’m 22 years old and for years I’ve been struggling with hypothyroidism and depression. Recently I went to check my blood for low T and was shocked but not surprised at the level (125). That’s terrible for a 22 year old given that’s the time my testosterone is supposed to be the highest. Anyways I’ve been prescribed depo testosterone 200ml bottle. I give myself a shot each week and haven’t really noticed much change. I know I have to give it time, but is there anything else I can do or should be prescribed to help speed up the process?
A: Testosterone products can improve a male's muscle strength and create a more lean body mass. Typically, these effects are not noticed within the first two weeks of therapy, but it is possible that he is more sensitive and responds well to the therapy. Some of the other more common side effects of testosterone patches are headache, depression, rash, changes in libido, acne, male pattern baldness, and increased cholesterol levels. This is not a complete list of the side effects associated with testosterone patches. Megan Uehara, PharmD
Stress less – I know this is easier said than done but if you can reduce your stress levels it will help your testosterone production. This is because stress makes your body produce cortisol which has many negative effects on the body including being a testosterone killer. Try meditating, exercising, deep breathing and other lifestyle changes to keep stress down and cortisol in check.
When many people think of someone with a high level of testosterone, they may picture a man loaded with strength, sexual prowess, and machismo. But while high-T has been correlated with all those things, it’s also been correlated with aggression, sexual misconduct, and violence. One of testosterone’s most common uses—as a performance-enhancing steroid—illustrates both sides of the hormone. Injecting steroids can be a quick way for athletes to dramatically improve performance, but the side effects can also be extreme, and can include excessive body hair growth, sexual dysfunction, and the hard-to-corral anger known as “roid rage.”

I request that my full name not be released. Ron will do. I am 81 years old and am not after a hot time in the sack, although I don’t pass up opportunity. Patches, gel and spray did not do much for my disposition, energy or overall sense of well being. 14 pellets every 3 to 4 months have made a world of difference. It is a bit painful but worth it as long as it helps. My Primary Dr. did have me state that I would not seek treatment for prostate cancer when I declined a biopsy. I pay for the pellets and at my age see no need for Medicare to pay for questionable tests.


If you have low testosterone and are prescribed testosterone therapy by your doctor, it does not increase your risk for getting prostate cancer. However, in some patients with existing prostate cancer, adding testosterone hormone therapy can make the cancer grow faster. Men with low testosterone levels are actually more likely to get prostate cancer than men with normal prostate levels. You need to discuss these details with your physician and make the best decision for you.
Some people can get away with more of a barebones approach to boosting their testosterone levels.  MET-Rx Tribulus 750 has been around for years and has been used by many to help get their testosterone levels back within the normal range.  The product has been laboratory tested and has been deemed safe for use by athletes, bodybuilders, and gym rats alike.
It also has vitamin B6. One study called out folate and vitamins B6 and B12 as important nutrients for athletes to achieve optimal health and performance. Vitamin B6 is commonly found in food, like fortified cereals, and as with magnesium, it’s possible to have too much vitamin B6. The NIH recommends an upper daily limit for adults of 100mg per day. Beast Sports comes well under this limit at 10mg per day, but still well above the minimum recommended dose of 1.7mg needed to see benefits.
There are two ways that we determine whether somebody has low testosterone. One is a blood test and the other is by characteristic symptoms and signs, and the correlation between those two methods is far from perfect. Generally men with the lowest testosterone have the most symptoms and men with highest testosterone have the least. But there are some men who have low levels of testosterone in their blood and have no symptoms.
If you live in or near the Pittsburgh, PA area, are over 35 and want a free blood test and Physician Exam to see if you are eligible for prescription testosterone, Arimidex and a DHT blocker. Additionally, you may have adult onset gH deficiency. By middle age, most people lose up to 85% of their endogenous gH production. You may also be eligibility for sermorelin, a gH releasing hormone. contact us at ReGenesis HRT. 724-510-0024
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It goes without saying that a healthy diet, quality sleep, productive lifestyle, and regular exercises can contribute to the overall increase of testosterone. However, it is also true that these activities are very often not enough for guys who have the problems with naturally low testosterone levels. This situation also includes people who want to boost their existing testosterone levels.
Fenugreek is an enigma, deep-fried in a mystery, and wrapped in secrecy. It can actually LOWER your testosterone levels while simultaneously increasing your libido and athletic performance, 2 effects that correlate with elevated testosterone levels.  Strange.  This is the first supplement I have come across that might have the opposite of the desired effect, and yet be worth taking anyway.

One study showed that six months of zinc supplementation among slightly zinc-deficient elderly men doubled serum levels of testosterone. And another eight-week trial found that college football players who took a nightly zinc supplement showed increased T-levels and increased leg strength that was 250 percent greater than a placebo! Holy quads, Batman! Research has also shown deficiencies in zinc to be a risk factor for infertility caused by low testosterone levels.
Are you getting enough vitamin D? Vitamin D is an essential nutrient, but it can be difficult for people to know if they are getting the right amount. Some people will be able to get enough vitamin D from sunlight. Others may need to make dietary changes or take supplements. Here, we explain how to get vitamin D from sunlight, food, and supplements. Read now
Some foods, vitamins, and herbs can help boost your testosterone levels. Be sure to talk to your doctor, if you’re concerned about low testosterone. These alternative and natural treatments aren’t proven to be more, or as, effective as traditional testosterone therapy. Some may also interact with any medications you may be taking and cause unintended side effects.

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There are three ways to increase testosterone activity naturally with simple lifestyle choices. The first is to increase total testosterone production. Second is to increase the amount of free and active testosterone that can stimulate testosterone receptors. The third is to unblock testosterone receptors, opening them up for testosterone stimulation.
There are three ways to increase testosterone activity naturally with simple lifestyle choices. The first is to increase total testosterone production. Second is to increase the amount of free and active testosterone that can stimulate testosterone receptors. The third is to unblock testosterone receptors, opening them up for testosterone stimulation.
Jeff- I read your post and I can relate to your problem. Perhaps you’ve already received some help but I can tell you this much. I recovered from prostate cancer about 2 yrs ago. My oncologist is also a graduate of Harvard like the doc that wrote this article. He put me on Axiron about 8 months ago after I complained to him of symptoms similar to you. He has no concerns that the T will cause me to get prostate cancer again. I do my 4 month check ups and have my T tested at that time along with my PSA. Everything is normal so far. My T count was initially 50 and now I am in the low 300 range. The Axiron has gotten me back to normal and then some!! I’m 58 and I told him at my last appt that I feel like I’m 40.
Hallie Levine is an award-winning magazine and freelance writer who contributes to Consumer Reports on health and fitness topics. Her work has been published in Health, Prevention, Reader's Digest, and Parents, among others. She's a mom to three kids and a fat but feisty black Labrador retriever named Ivry. In her (nonexistent) spare time, she likes to read, swim, and run marathons.
Well, this is another area of confusion and great debate, but I don’t think it’s as confusing as it appears to be in the literature. When most doctors learned about testosterone in medical school, they learned about total testosterone, or all the testosterone in the body. But about half of the testosterone that’s circulating in the bloodstream is not available to the cells. It’s tightly bound to a carrier molecule called sex hormone–binding globulin, which we abbreviate as SHBG.

A large number of trials have demonstrated a positive effect of testosterone treatment on bone mineral density (Katznelson et al 1996; Behre et al 1997; Leifke et al 1998; Snyder et al 2000; Zacharin et al 2003; Wang, Cunningham et al 2004; Aminorroaya et al 2005; Benito et al 2005) and bone architecture (Benito et al 2005). These effects are often more impressive in longer trials, which have shown that adequate replacement will lead to near normal bone density but that the full effects may take two years or more (Snyder et al 2000; Wang, Cunningham et al 2004; Aminorroaya et al 2005). Three randomized placebo-controlled trials of testosterone treatment in aging males have been conducted (Snyder et al 1999; Kenny et al 2001; Amory et al 2004). One of these studies concerned men with a mean age of 71 years with two serum testosterone levels less than 12.1nmol/l. After 36 months of intramuscular testosterone treatment or placebo, there were significant increases in vertebral and hip bone mineral density. In this study, there was also a significant decrease in the bone resorption marker urinary deoxypyridinoline with testosterone treatment (Amory et al 2004). The second study contained men with low bioavailable testosterone levels and an average age of 76 years. Testosterone treatment in the form of transdermal patches was given for 1 year. During this trial there was a significant preservation of hip bone mineral density with testosterone treatment but testosterone had no effect on bone mineral density at other sites including the vertebrae. There were no significant alterations in bone turnover markers during testosterone treatment (Kenny et al 2001). The remaining study contained men of average age 73 years. Men were eligible for the study if their serum total testosterone levels were less than 16.5 nmol/L, meaning that the study contained men who would usually be considered eugonadal. The beneficial effects of testosterone on bone density were confined to the men who had lower serum testosterone levels at baseline and were seen only in the vertebrae. There were no significant changes in bone turnover markers. Testosterone in the trial was given via scrotal patches for a 36 month duration (Snyder et al 1999). A recent meta-analysis of the effects on bone density of testosterone treatment in men included data from these studies and two other randomized controlled trials. The findings were that testosterone produces a significant increase of 2.7% in the bone mineral density at the lumber spine but no overall change at the hip (Isidori et al 2005). These results from randomized controlled trials in aging men show much smaller benefits of testosterone treatment on bone density than have been seen in other trials. This could be due to the trials including patients who are not hypogonadal and being too short to allow for the maximal effects of testosterone. The meta-analysis also assessed the data concerning changes of bone formation and resorption markers during testosterone treatment. There was a significant decrease in bone resorption markers but no change in markers of bone formation suggesting that reduction of bone resorption may be the primary mode of action of testosterone in improving bone density (Isidori et al 2005).
But when a premenopausal woman’s testosterone levels are too high, it can lead to polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), a condition that increases the risk of irregular or absent menstrual cycles, infertility, excess hair growth, skin problems, and miscarriage. High levels of testosterone in women, whether caused by PCOS or by another condition, can cause serious health conditions such as insulin resistance, diabetes, high cholesterol, high blood pressure, and heart disease. (12)
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