A notable study out of Wayne State University in Indiana found that older men who had a mild zinc deficiency significantly increased their testosterone from 8.3 to 16.0 nmol/L—a 93 percent increase—following six months of zinc supplementation. Researchers of the study concluded that zinc may play an important role in modulating serum testosterone levels in normal healthy men.6
More recently, a study from 2015 noted that consuming 600mg daily of standardized fenugreek extract for eight weeks increased free testosterone levels compared to placebo. The test group also experience an increase the the number of repetitions the could perform in the leg press before reaching failure. And, to top it off, subjects receiving the fenugreek supplement dropped body fat without losing strength.
I think that the importance of testosterone for cardiovascular health is going to be increasingly recognized. In the past, because men die of heart attacks more often than women and men have more testosterone, the fear has been that testosterone causes heart problems. But every single study of whether testosterone is bad for the heart has been negative, and what people haven’t pointed out in most of those negative studies is that there may be a beneficial effect.
“Our hypothesis was that testosterone would be good for the coronary arteries because we thought that by repleting testosterone to healthy levels there would be an improvement in the cholesterol panel and atherosclerosis burden. But what we found was the opposite, that atherosclerosis actually progresses faster under the influence of testosterone.”
I am a 67 yo male diagnosed with prostate cancer gleason 6. I have a prescription on bicalutamide 50 mg a day since Nov 2016 and leuprolide 11,5 mg every 3 months. My testicles reduced their size to half it´s original size, my libido is almost zero. I went through a radiotherapy of 45 sessions; my PSA level went from 11.2 to 0.13 on my last test from Sept 2017 and the leuprolide injections are taken away from my prescription by my urologist. I am planning to take TRT with Testosterone mix called SUSTANON 250 mg per week and HCG 5000 IUs twice a month. Give me your thoughts please
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In order to discuss the biochemical diagnosis of hypogonadism it is necessary to outline the usual carriage of testosterone in the blood. Total serum testosterone consists of free testosterone (2%–3%), testosterone bound to sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) (45%) and testosterone bound to other proteins (mainly albumin −50%) (Dunn et al 1981). Testosterone binds only loosely to albumin and so this testosterone as well as free testosterone is available to tissues and is termed bioavailable testosterone. Testosterone bound to SHBG is tightly bound and is biologically inactive. Bioavailable and free testosterone are known to correlate better than total testosterone with clinical sequelae of androgenization such as bone mineral density and muscle strength (Khosla et al 1998; Roy et al 2002). There is diurnal variation in serum testosterone levels with peak levels seen in the morning following sleep, which can be maintained into the seventh decade (Diver et al 2003). Samples should always be taken in the morning before 11 am to allow for standardization.
Fortunately supplementation of Vitamin D3 has been noted to significantly boost testosterone levels up to 20%.[40,41] This occurs via a reduction in sex-hormone binding globulin (SHBG) and aromatase expression, which limits the breakdown of testosterone into estrogen. It’s also worth mentioning that Vitamin D3 has been shown to raise levels of the anabolic hormone IGF-1.[42,43]
Ben has mentioned APOE many times, as in this podcast, with the reference in this transcript as something like 34/44. I’ve always assumed that meant a number of different genes that related to APOE having the homozygous or heterzygous mutations. I’ve only been able to find one rs in my 23andme raw data that seems meaningful to this, rs429358. How do you all figure out your APOE status? Are you getting this from one of the other companies that analyzes part of your raw data for you?
Using steroids eventually trains your body to realize that it doesn’t have to produce as much testosterone to reach its equilibrium, so to reach the same highs you’ll need to take more steroids, and when you stop taking them, your body will need to readjust — you’ll be living with low testosterone for a while (and you’ll need to see a doctor if your body doesn’t readjust on its own). Forcing your body to stay above your natural testosterone, even if you’re naturally low, can create this kind of dependency which ultimately decreases the amount of testosterone your body will produce on its own.
I’ve been reading all these comments and replies here. This was a great article and if it does anything, it should stimulate you to talk to your physician. Your Dr. can take blood and have it annylized, then prescribe the proper direction to take. A lot of people here have been giving free advice, but who knows your system best? Am I going to take advice from someone who doesn’t know anything other than the symptoms I present? I’m not, but what if I’m allergic?

Results from the clinical trial demonstrated that there were significant increases in hemoglobin in both men with unexplained anemia as well as men with anemia from known causes who used the testosterone gel. These results may be of clinical value, and testosterone treatment could be used to boost hemoglobin levels in men more than 65 who have unexplained anemia and low testosterone. However, more research needs to be done.


I think that the biggest hurdle for most physicians prescribing testosterone is the fear that they’re going to promote prostate cancer. [See “Incongruous findings,” below.] That’s because more than six decades ago, it was shown that if you lowered testosterone in men whose prostate cancer had metastasized, their condition improved. (It became a standard therapy that we still use today for men with advanced prostate cancer. We call it androgen deprivation or androgen-suppressive therapy.) The thinking became that if lowering testosterone makes prostate cancer disappear, at least for a while, then raising it must make prostate cancer grow. But even though it’s been a widely held belief for six decades, no one has found any additional evidence to support the theory.
Natural remedies for treating erectile dysfunction Erectile dysfunction has many causes, can affect any male, and is often distressing? Some people advocate several different natural remedies, mostly herbs and other plants. Here, we look at their merits and side effects, plus lifestyle changes, and alternative therapies that may bring relief for erectile dysfunction. Read now
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