Ginger rhizome powder was reported to posses an antioxidant and androgenic activity in doses of 50 mg/kg and 100 mg/kg daily [1]. Ginger administration significantly increased serum testosterone levels at 100 mg/kg [1]. There was also an increases in testosterone at 50 mg/kg daily but it failed to reach statistical significance [1]. A study by Kamtchouing et al. [2] also reported significantly increased serum and testicular testosterone levels as well as increase in weight of the testis and testicular cholesterol level in healthy rats. Another study using doses of 500 mg/kg and 1000 mg/kg indicated that extract of Zingiber officinale possesses pro-fertility properties [3]. Compared with the controls there was a dose and duration dependent increases in the serum testosterone levels and seminal quality [3]. At a very high dose (2000 mg/kg for 35 days), ginger led to slightly reduced weights of testes which might be due to negative feedback reaction from androgenic activity [4]. Combination of ginger and zinc appears to further increase testosterone in rats [24].
Another way to look at it is like this: Women are only capable of building a small amount of muscle without the use of performance enhancers, regardless of how hard they train or how rigid their meal plan is. When women reach their physical peak and are unable to move any further than that point, it’s because of their naturally low levels of testosterone.
The maximum hormone concentration in the blood is reported immediately after the workout. And the effect lasts throughout the day. However, it’s important to ensure that your physical activity is moderate. The matter is that too much high-intensity exercise can give an undesirable result. But even if for any reason you can’t attend a gym, it’s not a problem. Just move as much as possible during the day. Even simple walking will be of great benefit.
I’m a 70 year old male. Here’s my brief story, I was exhausted all the time after an encounter with H-Py-Lori. After may tests it was found out that my T-count was at about 250. I was put on a testosterone cream replacement therapy. Before I knew it, at about month I was at 1500 count. This was at 4 cream applications a day. The doctor took me down to twice/two applications a day, now I was at 600. I felt great at both levels.
I am 51 male. I have had low T for a few years now. I was using Testim for a few years, but I hated the smell and mostly feared getting thus stuff on the kids. The reason I stopped with all that nasty gel is because my T levels weren’t improving. So, why bother using anything that is not working, so I stopped. Apparently I am one of those men who do not absorb the gel very well. My T levels dropped from a low of around 200 on a 800+ scale to under 100 after I stopped using the gel.
The one side effect that no one talks about is psychological for me. Because I am 67 years old and suddenly look, feel and act 37 I only want to be around younger people. I have no use associating with people my own age. I have nothing in common and even look different. This year at my class reunion was a glaring example…..no doubt I looked younger than anyone, but it is sooo much more than just very that. My customers are young, all my girlfriends and associates. This all has a large effect on my mind. It’s hard to grasp suddenly looking and acting 30 years younger than your friends. My mind is so confused about how old I really am. I do a lot of adrenalin sports for my age snow ski, wake-surf, wake-board, scuba dive and it is no doubt just a matter of time till I get hurt doing these wild sports. In my mind I’m 37 so I think it’s all normal. This whole experience has been incredible and very positive with the only one psychological effect and no other physical side effect.
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A number of epidemiological studies have found that bone mineral density in the aging male population is positively associated with endogenous androgen levels (Murphy et al 1993; Ongphiphadhanakul et al 1995; Rucker et al 2004). Testosterone levels in young men have been shown to correlate with bone size, indicating a role in determination of peak bone mass and protection from future osteoporosis (Lorentzon et al 2005). Male hypogonadism has been shown to be a risk factor for hip fracture (Jackson et al 1992) and a recent study showed a high prevalence of hypogonadism in a group of male patients with average age 75 years presenting with minimal trauma fractures compared to stroke victims who acted as controls (Leifke et al 2005). Estrogen is a well known determinant of bone density in women and some investigators have found serum estrogen to be a strong determinant of male bone density (Khosla et al 1998; Khosla et al 2001). Serum estrogen was also found to correlate better than testosterone with peak bone mass (Khosla et al 2001) but this is in contradiction of a more recent study showing a negative correlation of estrogen with peak bone size (Lorentzon et al 2005). Men with aromatase deficiency (Carani et al 1997) or defunctioning estrogen receptor mutations (Smith et al 1994) have been found to have abnormally low bone density despite normal or high testosterone levels which further emphasizes the important influence of estrogen on male bone density.
Cross-sectional studies have not shown raised testosterone levels at the time of diagnosis of prostate cancer, and in fact, low testosterone at the time of diagnosis has been linked with more locally aggressive and malignant tumors (Massengill et al 2003; Imamoto et al 2005; Isom-Batz et al 2005). This may reflect loss of hormone related control of the tumor or the effect of a more aggressive tumor in decreasing testosterone levels. One study found that 14% of hypogonadal men, with normal digital rectal examination and PSA levels, had histological prostate cancer on biopsy. It is possible that low androgen levels masked the usual evidence of prostate cancer in this population (Morgentaler et al 1996). Most longitudinal studies have not shown a correlation between testosterone levels and the future development of prostate cancer (Carter et al 1995; Heikkila et al 1999; Stattin et al 2004) but a recent study did find a positive association (Parsons et al 2005). Interpretation of such data requires care, as the presentation of prostate cancer could be altered or delayed in patients with lower testosterone levels.
Hypogonadism is a disease in which the body is unable to produce normal amounts of testosterone due to a problem with the testicles or with the pituitary gland that controls the testicles. Testosterone replacement therapy can improve the signs and symptoms of low testosterone in these men. Doctors may prescribe testosterone as injections, pellets, patches or gels.
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