Remember that each person is unique, and each body responds differently to treatment. TT may help erectile function, low sex drive, bone marrow density, anemia, lean body mass, and/or symptoms of depression. However, there is no strong evidence that TT will help memory recall, measures of diabetes, energy, tiredness, lipid profiles, or quality of life.
Testosterone replacement therapy can successfully treat erectile dysfunction and loss of libido in men with low testosterone from either advancing age or hypogonadism. Although the effects of increased testosterone are more dramatic in hypogonadal men there are also benefits to the libido of men with normal gonadal, also called eugonadal, function. In a 2004 study published in the "Journal of Endocrinology and Metabolism," researchers found that increasing peak testosterone levels to between 400 and 500 percent above baseline in subjects resulted in a significant increase in sexual arousability over placebo subjects.

I am a 67 yo male diagnosed with prostate cancer gleason 6. I have a prescription on bicalutamide 50 mg a day since Nov 2016 and leuprolide 11,5 mg every 3 months. My testicles reduced their size to half it´s original size, my libido is almost zero. I went through a radiotherapy of 45 sessions; my PSA level went from 11.2 to 0.13 on my last test from Sept 2017 and the leuprolide injections are taken away from my prescription by my urologist. I am planning to take TRT with Testosterone mix called SUSTANON 250 mg per week and HCG 5000 IUs twice a month. Give me your thoughts please
While researchers in Brisbane, Australia, found that while Testofen (“a standardized [fenugreek] extract and mineral formulation”) significantly improved the sexual arousal, orgasm, and the general quality of life of participants, it did not remarkably increase testosterone above normal levels. Participants who took Testofen were more satisfied with their energy, well-being, and muscle strength than those who took the placebo.
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Vitamin D3: Vitamin D3 is actually more hormone than it is a vitamin. Vitamin D is taken in by around 10% of our diets and D3 is mostly absorbed from the sun, which can be linked to greater testosterone production. The link between the two is a result from the luteinizing hormone playing its role. Read more about how vitamin D3 effects testosterone — the evidence is staggering.

While testosterone stimulates a man’s sex drive, it also aids in achieving and maintaining an erection. Testosterone alone doesn’t cause an erection, but it stimulates receptors in the brain to produce nitric oxide. Nitric oxide is a molecule that helps trigger a series of chemical reactions necessary for an erection to occur. When testosterone levels are too low, a man may have difficulty achieving an erection prior to sex or having spontaneous erections (for example, during sleep).
Magnesium comes with a strict upper cap. Excess magnesium is hard on your kidneys, and can lead to kidney failure. The NIH recommends that men consume 400-420 mg of magnesium daily, but that they should not exceed 350 mg of supplemental magnesium per day. Because while it’s rare for people to chronically overdose on magnesium through diet (you’d have to eat a lot of almonds and spinach, for example), overdose by supplement is far more common.
if you’re a physician, you’re the real one who’s playing doctor. Stop prescribing low T treatment and let your patients go to a real doctor and not continue suffering. A simple picture of how hormones are created and their pathways will make you understand that E follows T, when we increase T, E2 will follow which negates all the positive effects of treatment. Without understanding this, you better leave the patient alone.

Hi Dean, thanks for reaching out bro! While testosterone boosters will help increase your T levels, strength, and libido, you need to make sure you’re eating the right foods and exercising in the right way. What is your current diet and workout plan? Maybe we can help? If you’re serious about getting in shape, a quality testosterone booster can certainly help. If you have a look at our top testosterone booster page, you’ll see TestoFuel is our best choice. If you have any more questions, don’t hesitate to write back! All the best bro, don’t give up, you can do it!
I thought your article was informative if researching effects of testosterone on cardiovascular and urological findings. However, it failed to key in on the psychological effects which cause noted behavioral changes. My husband was diagnosed with mildly low testosterone level and a fatty liver. Upon convincing his NP to put him on the topical gel as a first course of treatment he has stated he feels great, no longer foggy, and energetic like never before. Please understand, he was not having any sexual dysfunction but instead decreased energy and increased fatigue. What I also noticed is that he is now acting more dominant and agressive in his behavior. He speaks with the intent that nothing he says matters to him regardless of bluntness or disrespect. He has requested a divorce after 18 years of marriage without any prior indication that this was his intentions blindsiding our entire family and friend network. He recently got a job promotion since being on testosterone therapy and has a grandiose personal about him. He has lost 22 pounds and has decreased communications and contact with loved ones. He is scheduled to return to practitioner for a refill on his gel prescription and we, his family, are hoping that he may be taken off this medication which has drastically changed the man I have known for nearly 20 years. Unfortunately because he is a pilot and travels frequently we can only hope that he has not allowed his mental alertness spill over into his physical needs and allowed for infidelity to occur as he has changed all personal passwords, eliminated me accesss to flight benefits and checking account. We no longer get his schedule and therefore only await his sporadic call/texts to let us know if his whereabouts. He has developed a despiteful attitude towards me in a matter of 3 weeks which weeks. He has been on this medication for almost one month now. Prior to the medication, all was well and happy. This medication has completely changed our lives in a negative way. Perhaps practitioner need to consider the behavioral outcomes as well especially in men in their 40’s who may also be going through a mid life crisis. Take it from my firsthand experience that it is not been considered thoroughly in his case.

Testosterone does a lot more than you’d think, whether we’re talking about male or female biology. It’s the hormone that helps you burn fat, build muscle [1], and increase your sex drive [2], and its power doesn’t stop there. Keeping your testosterone levels in a normal range can make you happier, too [3], and testosterone can even improve your cardiovascular health and decrease your risk of mortality (from all causes!), according to a study of 83,000 older men who underwent testosterone replacement therapy [4].
There is a large body of evidence linking the onset and/or progression of cardiovascular disease to low testosterone levels in men. It is now apparent that an increased cardiovascular risk and accelerated development of atherosclerosis occurs not only in elderly men or men with obesity or type 2 diabetes mellitus, but also in non-obese men with hypogonadism.14 Current best evidence from systematic review of randomized controlled trials suggests that testosterone use in hypogonadal men is relatively safe in terms of cardiovascular health and do not produce unfavorable elevations in blood pressure or glycemic control, and does not adversely effect lipid profiles.4,15
There are positive correlations between positive orgasm experience in women and testosterone levels where relaxation was a key perception of the experience. There is no correlation between testosterone and men's perceptions of their orgasm experience, and also no correlation between higher testosterone levels and greater sexual assertiveness in either sex.[34]
Some foods, vitamins, and herbs can help boost your testosterone levels. Be sure to talk to your doctor, if you’re concerned about low testosterone. These alternative and natural treatments aren’t proven to be more, or as, effective as traditional testosterone therapy. Some may also interact with any medications you may be taking and cause unintended side effects.
Autopsy studies have found histological prostate cancer to be very common, with one series showing a prevalence of greater than fifty percent in men over age sixty (Holund 1980). The majority of histological cancers go undetected so that the clinical incidence of the disease is much lower, but it is still the most prevalent non-skin cancer in men (Jemal et al 2003). Prostate cancer is also unusual in comparison to other adult cancers in that the majority of those with the disease will die of other causes. Treatment of prostate cancer with androgen deprivation is known to be successful and is widely practiced, indicating an important role for testosterone in modifying the behavior of prostate cancer. In view of this, testosterone treatment is absolutely contraindicated in any case of known or suspected prostate cancer. The question of whether testosterone treatment could cause new cases of prostate cancer, or more likely cause progression of undiagnosed histological prostate cancer that would otherwise have remained occult, is an important consideration when treating ageing males with testosterone.
It's important to understand that your body requires saturated fats from animal and vegetable sources (such as meat, dairy, certain oils, and tropical plants like coconut) for optimal functioning, and if you neglect this important food group in favor of sugar, grains and other starchy carbs, your health and weight are almost guaranteed to suffer. Examples of healthy fats you can eat more of to give your testosterone levels a boost include:

Cholesterol is the building block of testosterone, and eating healthy fats, including saturated fats, helps your body make “good” cholesterol while also supporting healthy hormone balance. Give your body a dose of healthy fats and proteins by consuming moderate amounts of meats from hormone-free animals, grassfed cattle, and wild-caught fish. Nosh on healthy-fat sources such as olives, nuts, seeds, avocados, and coconut oil.
Testosterone causes prostate cancer. Since the 1940s, it was commonly believed in the medical field that high testosterone levels were the cause of prostate cancer in men. Doctors reached this conclusion because two scientists in 1941 noticed that prostate cancer regressed in a patient after they castrated him and his T levels subsequently declined. This conclusion was based on the results from a single patient!
It's not enough just to increase the testosterone your body produces, because as we age, the testosterone we naturally produce is often bound by SHBG (sex hormone binding globulin) thus becoming unavailable for use in the body. It’s imperative that your testosterone remains unbound or “free” if you want to enjoy all the wonderful benefits testosterone provides.
Why is there no information on the increase of estrogen when on Testosterone replacement therapy? I have been on t replacement for about 2 years and over that time my balls have gotten to the size of a large grape. I have fatty tissue on my chest and my estrogen level is over 400. There needs to be a study created to test all of these side effects and posable treatments like estrogen lowering drugs and HCG for maintaining Testicle size.
Hi I just turned 50 , and for the past 6 years I have been going through depression , low energy , insomnia , but my sex drive was not bad, I really did not know what it was , so last month my family doctor asked that I test my testosterone and the result was 7.2 noml/l (208 ngdl. So I was prescribed 2.5g 1% androgel, after two weeks I did not feel a difference , on the box it says that the recommended dose is 5g 1% , so my doctor prescribed the 5g 1 % , its now a week since I started the 5 g ( all together three weeks since I started androgel ) & now I feel great, my mood and energy level is way better, I never had an issue with my libdo , so no difference there. I asked my family doctor to refer me to an endocrinologist, just to get a second opinion but that appointment will happen only after 5 months, huge wait time. I am not worried about all that is said about side effects like prostate cancer , heart issues etc because otherwise I am very healthy and have family history of cancers and heart issues , but what worries me is , will my testes & p.glands stop producing Testosterone because of this external replacement? Something I would not want to happen at 50, because probably with exercise & diet I could try boosting by my T.Level naturally. More over will I become sterile , I have a young wife and we may have more kids. Also the gel application is very uncomfortable since I have young kids in the house I have o take extreme caution. Last was it worth starting TRT without finding out the level of my free testosterone. appreciate your advise. Thanks.
This is over simplified but should offer you some clarity to what you are experiencing – If you are getting Testosterone Cypionate injections every 2 weeks, then you are on the roller coaster. I have great results with weekly injections and some folks need bi-weekly injections. It’s all how your body reacts but every 2 weeks is just plain too far apart as the product is relatively ineffective after 10 days. Measurable at 10 days? Somewhat but still ineffective at that point.
If a young man's low testosterone is a problem for a couple trying to get pregnant, gonadotropin injections may be an option in some cases. These are hormones that signal the body to produce more testosterone. This may increase the sperm count. Hedges also describes implantable testosterone pellets, a relatively new form of treatment in which several pellets are placed under the skin of the buttocks, where they release testosterone over the course of about three to four months. Injections and nasal gels may be other options for some men.
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