The brain is also affected by this sexual differentiation;[13] the enzyme aromatase converts testosterone into estradiol that is responsible for masculinization of the brain in male mice. In humans, masculinization of the fetal brain appears, by observation of gender preference in patients with congenital diseases of androgen formation or androgen receptor function, to be associated with functional androgen receptors.[99]

First is quality, Advanced BCAA’s are made from whey protein isolate. Typical free form amino acids are made from human hair and other not so favorable sources. In addition many free form amino acids are made in China. Secondly is the “form” the amino acids are in. Advanced BCAA’s are in peptide form. Meaning they are in di and trip peptide form. The body ABSORBS amino acids in di and trip peptide form, through the intestinal wall and into the blood stream. It is still not known whether free form amino acids are absorbed by the body. Keep in mind that free form amino acids supplements have been around since the 80’s. They have never been proved to help muscle recovery and grow. Di and tri peptides have been proven to be beneficial for muscle recovery.

Hallie Levine is an award-winning magazine and freelance writer who contributes to Consumer Reports on health and fitness topics. Her work has been published in Health, Prevention, Reader's Digest, and Parents, among others. She's a mom to three kids and a fat but feisty black Labrador retriever named Ivry. In her (nonexistent) spare time, she likes to read, swim, and run marathons.
Hello everyone. First off, thank you Dr. Abraham Morgentaler, for the excellent and refreshing article. I do not intend to spill my guts about symptoms or values on here as it has already been done so many times over. I will say that I am an RN BSN and have been on HRT for going on 6 yrs. I live in Oklahoma and when I first started noticing symptoms I knew something was wrong and began to do research myself. With an initial level of 241 no doctor here at that time, would even consider HRT as I was only 35ish at the time.
The maximum hormone concentration in the blood is reported immediately after the workout. And the effect lasts throughout the day. However, it’s important to ensure that your physical activity is moderate. The matter is that too much high-intensity exercise can give an undesirable result. But even if for any reason you can’t attend a gym, it’s not a problem. Just move as much as possible during the day. Even simple walking will be of great benefit.
A man with shrinking levels of testosterone actually may lose some body hair. Testosterone replacement therapy comes with a few potential side effects, including acne and breast enlargement. Testosterone patches may cause minor skin irritation. Topical gels may be easier to use, but great care must be taken to avoid transferring testosterone to someone else though skin-to-skin contact.
"I went from 230 pounds down to 192. When my son got married, I went for the suit fitting, and I was a size 48. When I went back to do the final fitting, I was a 44! I want to keep getting it for the weight loss; I lost 4 inches around my belly, and I want to get rid of the rest of the weight around my belly. I’m 57, and my wife says I look like I’m back in my 30s. I have more energy for sure, and I’m going to participate in one of those Savage races where they have the obstacle courses with one of our kids."
Hello I’m 22 years old and for years I’ve been struggling with hypothyroidism and depression. Recently I went to check my blood for low T and was shocked but not surprised at the level (125). That’s terrible for a 22 year old given that’s the time my testosterone is supposed to be the highest. Anyways I’ve been prescribed depo testosterone 200ml bottle. I give myself a shot each week and haven’t really noticed much change. I know I have to give it time, but is there anything else I can do or should be prescribed to help speed up the process?
   The International Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance recently studied tennis players, rugby teams, and wrestlers to find a link between testosterone and competitive outcome. They found that the difference between winning and losing was reflected in testosterone levels! The athletes' own natural testosterone prior to the game was directly related to the outcome after the game -- the higher the testosterone, the more frequently the athlete won.6
For this reason, after the 2008 financial market meltdown, some commentators put the blame for the crash on the male-dominated profession, arguing that men take too many risks, and the economy would do better and be more stable if it was run by women. Of course, risk-taking does come with inherent risk, but it has also been responsible for the lion’s share of society’s progress and innovation since the dawn of time. Financial markets would likely not exist – period – without testosterone-driven risk-taking.
There are three ways to increase testosterone activity naturally with simple lifestyle choices. The first is to increase total testosterone production. Second is to increase the amount of free and active testosterone that can stimulate testosterone receptors. The third is to unblock testosterone receptors, opening them up for testosterone stimulation.
In order to discuss the biochemical diagnosis of hypogonadism it is necessary to outline the usual carriage of testosterone in the blood. Total serum testosterone consists of free testosterone (2%–3%), testosterone bound to sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) (45%) and testosterone bound to other proteins (mainly albumin −50%) (Dunn et al 1981). Testosterone binds only loosely to albumin and so this testosterone as well as free testosterone is available to tissues and is termed bioavailable testosterone. Testosterone bound to SHBG is tightly bound and is biologically inactive. Bioavailable and free testosterone are known to correlate better than total testosterone with clinical sequelae of androgenization such as bone mineral density and muscle strength (Khosla et al 1998; Roy et al 2002). There is diurnal variation in serum testosterone levels with peak levels seen in the morning following sleep, which can be maintained into the seventh decade (Diver et al 2003). Samples should always be taken in the morning before 11 am to allow for standardization.
Hello I’m 22 years old and for years I’ve been struggling with hypothyroidism and depression. Recently I went to check my blood for low T and was shocked but not surprised at the level (125). That’s terrible for a 22 year old given that’s the time my testosterone is supposed to be the highest. Anyways I’ve been prescribed depo testosterone 200ml bottle. I give myself a shot each week and haven’t really noticed much change. I know I have to give it time, but is there anything else I can do or should be prescribed to help speed up the process?

I was depressed, getting fat, and zero libido. My doc did a full blood work up. My Total Testosterone level was 289 ng/dl. He offered TRT but I declined because I knew, at 53, that if I went on TRT my own testosterone production would shut down and at my age I would have a pretty difficult time kick starting it up again. I researched and researched for about a month. I started on Vitamin D 10,000 iu per day ( I knew this was a safe amount because I tested at 26ng/dl and optimum level is anywhere between 40-80ng/dl. I also took 1,200 mg of magnesium, 9mg of Boron and Vitamin K Complex. Tested again 3 months later and blood work showed I was at 720.
A: Testosterone products can improve a male's muscle strength and create a more lean body mass. Typically, these effects are not noticed within the first two weeks of therapy, but it is possible that he is more sensitive and responds well to the therapy. Some of the other more common side effects of testosterone patches are headache, depression, rash, changes in libido, acne, male pattern baldness, and increased cholesterol levels. This is not a complete list of the side effects associated with testosterone patches. Megan Uehara, PharmD
Amazing this thread is going after 3 years. Very good indeed. I have low cortisol and my doctor decided to check testosterone. It came back at 5! Not 500, but 5! My doctor did not believe this to be correct. She indicated I would not be able to grow facial hair and that my arm hair would have fell out. She retested. It came back at 23. WTH. So she wanted to start me on Clomid. Well of course my insurance would not cover this. Most pharmacies wanted $300-400 for a 30 day supply. Can’t afford that! The 2 pharmacies that were reasonable cannot get it from their suppliers at this time. So my doctor wants to start weekly injections. I do not know what to think but am trying to find all the information I can on the subject as I am quite nervous. So if anyone else is still reading or comes across this please let me know what you think or your story. it would very much be appreciated. i will be 38 next month and am a little “lost” about all of this. Many thanks! 🙂
Sexual arousal - boosting testosterone can improve sexual arousal, even if you have normal testosterone levels. Higher levels of testosterone can make it easier for you to get aroused and can boost your sex drive generally. While this doesn’t affect the physical action of your erections, if you are not getting hard because you’re not aroused then boosting testosterone could help.

A recent study compared total and bioavailable testosterone levels with inflammatory cytokines in men aged 65 and over. There was an inverse correlation with the pro-inflammatory soluble interleukin-6 receptor, but no association with interleukin-6 (IL-6), highly sensitive CRP (hsCRP), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) or interleukin-1β (IL-1β (Maggio et al 2006). Another trial found that young men with idiopathic hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism had higher levels of proinflammatory factors interleukin-2 (IL-2), interleukin-4 (IL-4), complement C3c and total immunoglobulin in comparison to controls (Yesilova et al 2000). Testosterone treatment in a group of hypogonadal men, mostly with known coronary artery disease, induced anti-inflammatory changes in the cytokine profile of reduced IL-1β and TNF-α and increased IL-10 (Malkin, Pugh, Jones et al 2004).
DHEA (dehydroepiandrosterone) extract - this is a chemical that used in your body which a ‘hormone precursor’. This means it’s the chemical used by the body to create hormones like oestrogen or testosterone. When taken as supplement it is believed to boost testosterone levels, but DHEA has not been shown to increase testosterone in men. DHEA comes in two form:

In order to discuss the biochemical diagnosis of hypogonadism it is necessary to outline the usual carriage of testosterone in the blood. Total serum testosterone consists of free testosterone (2%–3%), testosterone bound to sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) (45%) and testosterone bound to other proteins (mainly albumin −50%) (Dunn et al 1981). Testosterone binds only loosely to albumin and so this testosterone as well as free testosterone is available to tissues and is termed bioavailable testosterone. Testosterone bound to SHBG is tightly bound and is biologically inactive. Bioavailable and free testosterone are known to correlate better than total testosterone with clinical sequelae of androgenization such as bone mineral density and muscle strength (Khosla et al 1998; Roy et al 2002). There is diurnal variation in serum testosterone levels with peak levels seen in the morning following sleep, which can be maintained into the seventh decade (Diver et al 2003). Samples should always be taken in the morning before 11 am to allow for standardization.
Longitudinal studies in male aging studies have shown that serum testosterone levels decline with age (Harman et al 2001; Feldman et al 2002). Total testosterone levels fall at an average of 1.6% per year whilst free and bioavailable levels fall by 2%–3% per year. The reduction in free and bioavailable testosterone levels is larger because aging is also associated with increases in SHBG levels (Feldman et al 2002). Cross-sectional data supports these trends but has usually shown smaller reductions in testosterone levels with aging (Feldman et al 2002). This is likely to reflect strict entry criteria to cross-sectional studies so that young healthy men are compared to older healthy men. During the course of longitudinal studies some men may develop pathologies which accentuate decreases in testosterone levels.

"I went from 230 pounds down to 192. When my son got married, I went for the suit fitting, and I was a size 48. When I went back to do the final fitting, I was a 44! I want to keep getting it for the weight loss; I lost 4 inches around my belly, and I want to get rid of the rest of the weight around my belly. I’m 57, and my wife says I look like I’m back in my 30s. I have more energy for sure, and I’m going to participate in one of those Savage races where they have the obstacle courses with one of our kids."
ALABAMA - ALASKA - ARIZONA - ARKANSAS - CALIFORNIA - COLORADO - CONNECTICUT - DELAWARE - FLORIDA - GEORGIA - HAWAII - IDAHO - ILLINOIS - INDIANA - IOWA - KANSAS - KENTUCKY - LOUISIANA - MAINE - MARYLAND - MASSACHUSETTS - MICHIGAN - MINNESOTA - MISSISSIPPI - MONTANA - NEBRASKA - NEW HAMPSHIRE - NEW YORK - NEW JERSEY - NEW MEXICO - NEVADA - NORTH CAROLINA - NORTH DAKOTA - OHIO - OKLAHOMA - OREGON - PENNSYLVANIA - RHODE ISLAND - SOUTH CAROLINA - SOUTH DAKOTA - TENNESSEE - TEXAS - UTAH - VERMONT - VIRGINIA - WASHINGTON - WASHINGTON DC - WEST VIRGINIA - WISCONSIN - WYOMING

Vitamin D3 has the ability to naturally boost testosterone levels.  Increasing serum vitamin D levels in the body can help increase testosterone production, allowing you to potentially build muscle at a faster rate. If you don’t live in an area of the world that allows for a good amount of sunlight, you could become deficient and could benefit from a vitamin D supplement.

When it comes to testosterone in the body, most of it is bound testosterone. This means it is testosterone that is bound to either the sex hormone globulin or the protein albumin. The problem is this bound up testosterone goes largely unused by the body and does nothing for you in its bound state. It is the free testosterone that is the testosterone you feel and that makes you manly, this is free flowing in your veins and not bound to anything. This is the kind of testosterone you want, the more the better.
Vitamin D3. Vitamin D3 actually isn’t a vitamin, it’s a hormone — a really important hormone that provides a whole host of health benefits. Our bodies can naturally make vitamin D from the sun, but recent studies have shown that many Westerners are vitamin D3 deprived because we’re spending less and less time outdoors. When we do decide to venture outside, we slather our bodies with sunscreen, which prevents the sun reaching our skin to kick-off vitamin D3 production. If you’re not getting enough sun, you may have a vitamin D3 deficiency, which may contribute to low T levels. If you think you need more vitamin D3, supplement it with a pill. Studies have shown that men who take this supplement see a boost in their testosterone levels. Because I have a darker complexion — which makes me prone to Vitamin D3 deficiency — I took 4,000 IU of vitamin D3 in the morning.
Preliminary research has shown that clomiphene citrate (Clomid), a drug generally prescribed to stimulate ovulation in women struggling with infertility, can foster the production of natural testosterone, termed endogenous testosterone, in men. In a recent prospective study, 36 hypogonadal men took a daily dose of clomiphene citrate for at least three months. Within four to six weeks, all of the men had heightened levels of testosterone; none reported any side effects during the year they were followed.
On the average, you need to sleep at least 8 hours per night to stay healthy. If you want a night sleep to contribute to the maximum testosterone production, it’s important to make your sleep comfortable. Thus, the bedroom temperature shouldn’t exceed 21°C. In addition, you should ventilate your bedroom thoroughly before sleeping. Furthermore, before going to bed, don’t overload your stomach with fatty foods, as well as don’t drink alcohol and caffeinated beverages. Finally, you have to avoid intense physical activity before bedtime.6
There are several supplements on the market claiming to be natural testosterone boosters. I get these sorts of things in the mail all time. The companies that produce these products claim that the herbs (typically stinging nettle and tribulus) in their pills increase free testosterone by reducing SHBG. They also throw in some B vitamins for “increased energy and vitality.”
There is a large body of evidence linking the onset and/or progression of cardiovascular disease to low testosterone levels in men. It is now apparent that an increased cardiovascular risk and accelerated development of atherosclerosis occurs not only in elderly men or men with obesity or type 2 diabetes mellitus, but also in non-obese men with hypogonadism.14 Current best evidence from systematic review of randomized controlled trials suggests that testosterone use in hypogonadal men is relatively safe in terms of cardiovascular health and do not produce unfavorable elevations in blood pressure or glycemic control, and does not adversely effect lipid profiles.4,15
Benefits: Ashwagandha a wonderful herb originating from India is also called the Indian Ginseng because of it’s regard as a powerful aphrodisiac. Ashwagandha roots when consumed it increases sexual powers. These sexual powers include maintaining a stronger erection, longevity, enhanced sexual feeling. It also enhances fertility by increasing sperm count and quality. Ashwaganda works by reducing prolactin and neutralizing free radicals which both leads to increased testosterone levels.

While researchers in Brisbane, Australia, found that while Testofen (“a standardized [fenugreek] extract and mineral formulation”) significantly improved the sexual arousal, orgasm, and the general quality of life of participants, it did not remarkably increase testosterone above normal levels. Participants who took Testofen were more satisfied with their energy, well-being, and muscle strength than those who took the placebo.
The final two studies looked directly at soy vs testosterone levels. The first looked at introducing consumption of soya flour on testosterone levels. They found that those who ate the Soy flour lowered their T levels during the study (43). And the second study looked at the consumption of soy protein isolates (powder) in healthy men. They found that testosterone levels decreased upon consumption of soy powder (45).
I bought most of the ingredients for my Testosterone Salad at Whole Foods. For those curious, I added up all the ingredients and divided by six (I typically ate six of these salads in a week). The cost per salad was roughly $5. That’s about the price many folks pay every day for a crappy fast food meal. If you’re on a budget, I’m sure you could get the ingredients at Walmart and bring the cost per salad down even more.
Tribulus is a herb used in China and India for many centuries, mainly for it’s libido enhancing properties and supposed testosterone boosting properties. It enhances testosterone levels by increasing luteinizing hormone (LH) levels. LH is responsible for “telling” the body to produce testosterone. This herb contains Dioscin, protodioscin, diosgenin. These three organic component stimulate sexual performance and may be useful for a variety of sexual disorders such as low testosterone, low sexual energy and weak erections.
A related issue is the potential use of testosterone as a coronary vasodilator and anti-anginal agent. Testosterone has been shown to act as a vasodilator of coronary arteries at physiological concentrations during angiography (Webb, McNeill et al 1999). Furthermore men given a testosterone injection prior to exercise testing showed improved performance, as assessed by ST changes compared to placebo (Rosano et al 1999; Webb, Adamson et al 1999). Administration of one to three months of testosterone treatment has also been shown to improve symptoms of angina and exercise test performance (Wu and Weng 1993; English et al 2000; Malkin, Pugh, Morris et al 2004). Longer term studies are underway. It is thought that testosterone improves angina due its vasodilatory action, which occurs independently of the androgen receptor, via blockade of L-type calcium channels at the cell membrane of the vascular smooth muscle in an action similar to the dihydropyridine calcium-channel blockers such as nifedipine (Hall et al 2006).
Both testosterone and 5α-DHT are metabolized mainly in the liver.[1][155] Approximately 50% of testosterone is metabolized via conjugation into testosterone glucuronide and to a lesser extent testosterone sulfate by glucuronosyltransferases and sulfotransferases, respectively.[1] An additional 40% of testosterone is metabolized in equal proportions into the 17-ketosteroids androsterone and etiocholanolone via the combined actions of 5α- and 5β-reductases, 3α-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase, and 17β-HSD, in that order.[1][155][156] Androsterone and etiocholanolone are then glucuronidated and to a lesser extent sulfated similarly to testosterone.[1][155] The conjugates of testosterone and its hepatic metabolites are released from the liver into circulation and excreted in the urine and bile.[1][155][156] Only a small fraction (2%) of testosterone is excreted unchanged in the urine.[155]

Millions of American men use a prescription testosterone gel or injection to restore normal levels of the manly hormone. The ongoing pharmaceutical marketing blitz promises that treating "low T" this way can make men feel more alert, energetic, mentally sharp, and sexually functional. However, legitimate safety concerns linger. For example, some older men on testosterone could face higher cardiac risks.
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