How is it that women for many years have had HRT available and it is common place and acceptable for them? Men are expected to just have a decline and when they start to look into this, immediately they are looked at as they just want to do steroids. This is not the case for any of the comments I have read. I too simply like having my levels where they should be and if taken for this reason should be common place just as it is for estrogen replacement in women.


In my late 20’s, I visited an anti-aging doctor who was one of the pioneers of what we now call functional medicine. I got a full hormone test. Shockingly, my testosterone was lower than my mother’s. No wonder I felt crappy and was overweight. My other sex hormones were out of whack too, especially my estrogen levels. They were high because the little testosterone I did make my body converted into estrogen. I went on a mix of topical replacement testosterone cream, plus small doses of pharmaceuticals like clomid and arimidex in order to keep my other sex hormones functioning properly.

2009 had heart attack, placed coronary stent, everything okay. Put on statins to keep lipid levels down to prevent further artery blockage. One year later developed Peyronie’s disease, low sex drive, fatigue, testicles withdrawn and hurting. Testosterone level was 85. Diagnosed with hypogonadism. Started Androgel, felt normal after a couple of weeks. I believe statins is the cause of my low T, you need lipids for hormone transport. Androgel could only bring my T level in the 250 range. Switched to Axiron (better, less messy), and my T level stays around 500 range. I get samples of Testim every now and then, it has a manly woody fragrance that women like. At present, I’m feeling a little fatigue, and mild dehydration. My lab work is always normal, except my red blood cells is always on the high side, almost abnormal. Next week I am going to donate some blood, to bring my RBC count down, and see if that will help.

We required all of our testosterone boosters to have magnesium, but gave preference to magnesium aspartate, citrate, lactate, and chloride. These forms have been found to be more easily absorbed than magnesium oxide and sulfate. (On the other hand, it didn’t count if the supplement had magnesium stearate, which is used to make pills not stick together.)
Felt I was more sluggish than I should be,Went on TRT ’cause my bloodwork said I fell in the parameters for hormone therapy. When i started felt I was 17, (I was 50))I did everything possible and passed for type A, and physiologically, things seem to heal faster. But I missed memories, now that I was speeded-up I no longer could easily connect and be a part of them.

Tribulus is a herb used in China and India for many centuries, mainly for it’s libido enhancing properties and supposed testosterone boosting properties. It enhances testosterone levels by increasing luteinizing hormone (LH) levels. LH is responsible for “telling” the body to produce testosterone. This herb contains Dioscin, protodioscin, diosgenin. These three organic component stimulate sexual performance and may be useful for a variety of sexual disorders such as low testosterone, low sexual energy and weak erections.
Margaret, I’m on Trt, and my wife is 43 going through Peri- (early/pre) menopause. She started trying about a drop a day to see if her libido would improve, and it did, dramatically, and also her moods and patience. After about a month of feeling 30again, she started noticing lite facial hair developing, decreased breast size, and return of all previous symptoms. So she went off it. About a month later, she started St.JohnsWart, and everything improved tenfold. Now she feels 20 instead of just 30 on testosterone. She literally glows with smiles and energy, and has an extremely high libido. Maybe try that first. Good luck.
The other problem researchers run into when studying the benefits of testosterone is distinguishing between “cause” and “effect.” Is it T that’s providing all these great health benefits or does simply being healthy give you optimal levels of testosterone? It’s tricky because in some instances the answer is “both.” Testosterone (like all hormones) often plays a part in a “virtuous cycle” that regulates a whole host of  processes in our bodies — as you increase T, you get healthier; as you get healthier, your T levels rise. It can also play a part in a “vicious cycle” — as your T levels go down, your health suffers; as your health suffers, your T levels decrease even more.
So much to say, take a look at excelmale.com. it is a resource for men like us that give answers, science and dialogue which addresses our questions. It’s a great resource for men like us. Also, I would say to eliminate blue light before bed from tv and pc screens. Simply use blue light blocking glasses or F.lux from the play store. Also get outside in the sun in the AM. The goal is to restore the circadian rhythm which impacts hormone productiion.
Nutritional developers formulated Nugenix® with Testofen®, a key natural ingredient to help boost “free” testosterone along with resistance training. This key ingredient is carefully extracted from the fenugreek plant. A Testofen® study in Irvine, California indicated positive free testosterone-related results. Nugenix also includes L-Citrulline Malate, Tribulus, Zinc, plus Vitamins B6 and B12 to help promote overall health and performance.*
I know many of you are clamoring for the “how-to” part of this series (which will go up on Thursday), but before we get to that, it’s important to cover why you should even care about your testosterone levels in the first place, what T is and how it’s made, and how to get properly tested for it. Building a sound foundation before we dive into the nitty gritty details will be highly beneficial.
In order to discuss the biochemical diagnosis of hypogonadism it is necessary to outline the usual carriage of testosterone in the blood. Total serum testosterone consists of free testosterone (2%–3%), testosterone bound to sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) (45%) and testosterone bound to other proteins (mainly albumin −50%) (Dunn et al 1981). Testosterone binds only loosely to albumin and so this testosterone as well as free testosterone is available to tissues and is termed bioavailable testosterone. Testosterone bound to SHBG is tightly bound and is biologically inactive. Bioavailable and free testosterone are known to correlate better than total testosterone with clinical sequelae of androgenization such as bone mineral density and muscle strength (Khosla et al 1998; Roy et al 2002). There is diurnal variation in serum testosterone levels with peak levels seen in the morning following sleep, which can be maintained into the seventh decade (Diver et al 2003). Samples should always be taken in the morning before 11 am to allow for standardization.
"I went from 230 pounds down to 192. When my son got married, I went for the suit fitting, and I was a size 48. When I went back to do the final fitting, I was a 44! I want to keep getting it for the weight loss; I lost 4 inches around my belly, and I want to get rid of the rest of the weight around my belly. I’m 57, and my wife says I look like I’m back in my 30s. I have more energy for sure, and I’m going to participate in one of those Savage races where they have the obstacle courses with one of our kids."
However, if you have normal testosterone levels and are looking for a boost, for strength gaining purposes, then D-Aspartic acid use may prove less fruitful. A study published in Nutrition Research showed that when the booster was given to men who resistance trained four times a week, their body composition and muscle strength was no different to men who took part in resistance training without the aid of D-Aspartic acid.
Sharma, R., Oni, O. A., Gupta, K., Chen, G., Sharma, M., Dawn, B., … & Barua, R. S. (2015, August 6). Normalization of testosterone level is associated with reduced incidence of myocardial infarction. European Heart Journal, 36(40), 2706-2715. Retrieved from https://academic.oup.com/eurheartj/article/36/40/2706/2293361/Normalization-of-testosterone-level-is-associated
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