The other problem researchers run into when studying the benefits of testosterone is distinguishing between “cause” and “effect.” Is it T that’s providing all these great health benefits or does simply being healthy give you optimal levels of testosterone? It’s tricky because in some instances the answer is “both.” Testosterone (like all hormones) often plays a part in a “virtuous cycle” that regulates a whole host of  processes in our bodies — as you increase T, you get healthier; as you get healthier, your T levels rise. It can also play a part in a “vicious cycle” — as your T levels go down, your health suffers; as your health suffers, your T levels decrease even more.
Although it’s rare to see swelling caused by fluid retention, physicians need to be careful when prescribing testosterone to men with compromised kidney or liver function, or some degree of congestive heart failure. It can also increase the oiliness of the skin, so that some men get acne or pimples, but that’s quite uncommon, as are sleep apnea and gynecomastia (breast enlargement).
Actually he knows exactly what he is talking about. The fact your a doctor gives zero confidence that you have any knowledge in HRT, in fact I believe it where you wonderful doctors that started the larger opioid epedemic the world has ever seen. Make sure if your considering HRT you see a doctor that specializes in it, otherwise you very well could be getting terrible advice by a doctor with no knowledge of the subject as is the case here. Do your research on the doctor, and make sure you are getting a doctor that specializes in HRT. Don’t forget somebody had to finish at the bottom of the class in med school, and based on this doctors comments he probably was one of them. Doctors can be as dangerous as they are helpful; as we have seen quite clearly with the opioid epidemic being experienced in this country, as I mentioned above. This epidemic was caused 100% by doctors in this country. I own several HRT clinics and employ some of the top doctors in the HRT field. Our doctors put our patients health above all else especially above the all mighty dollar. I assure you the comment by this Dr. claiming the post above makes absolutely no sense (I believe it makes no sense to him, because he has zero knowledge on the subject) is dead wrong, and the poster was pretty much right on point with what he said.
Testosterone levels generally peak during adolescence and early adulthood. As you get older, your testosterone level gradually declines — typically about 1 percent a year after age 30 or 40. It is important to determine in older men if a low testosterone level is simply due to the decline of normal aging or if it is due to a disease (hypogonadism).
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