Another recent development is the production of adhesive tablets which are applied twice daily to the buccal mucosa on the gum above the incisor teeth. The tablets gradually release testosterone into the systemic venous circulation and steady state physiological concentrations are achieved in most patients within two days (Ross et al 2004). Some patients do not like the feeling of the tablet in the mouth or find that there is an abnormal taste in the mouth, but local adverse effects are usually mild and transient (Wang, Swerdloff et al 2004).
The results of these studies indicate that testosterone treatment in older men with low testosterone may proffer some benefits. However, testosterone treatments may also entail risks. The exact trade-off is unknown. Larger and longer studies need to be performed to clarify the effects of testosterone on heart health, bone health, disability, and more.
In addition to weightlifting, studies have shown that HIIT workouts can also help boost testosterone levels. For those of you who don’t know, HIIT stands for high-intensity interval training. It calls for short, intense bursts of exercise, followed by a less-intense recovery period. You repeat with the intense/less-intense cycle several times throughout the workout. In addition to increasing T, HIIT has been shown to improve athletic conditioning and fat metabolism, as well as increase muscle strength.
“She” being the key word. I had to quit a female doc because even though my level was down to 200, she thought I just needed more vitamin D! When I tried that and came back a few weeks later and told her there was no change in how I felt she refused to order another blood test, and after that wouldn’t even see me. I would never trust a female doctor with testosterone replacement therapy, as they all seem to have the same shit attitude from what my friends have told me, they treat it like it’s not a real thing even though you better bow down and kiss their asses when it comes to breast cancer and menopause.
Studies of the effects on cognition of testosterone treatment in non-cognitively impaired eugonadal and hypogonadal ageing males have shown varying results, with some showing beneficial effects on spatial cognition (Janowsky et al 1994; Cherrier et al 2001), verbal memory (Cherrier et al 2001) and working memory (Janowsky et al 2000), and others showing no effects (Sih et al 1997; Kenny et al 2002). Other trials have examined the effects of testosterone treatment in older men with Alzheimer’s disease or cognitive decline. Results have been promising, with two studies showing beneficial effects of testosterone treatment on spatial and verbal memory (Cherrier et al 2005b) and cognitive assessments including visual-spatial memory (Tan and Pu 2003), and a recent randomized controlled trial comparing placebo versus testosterone versus testosterone and an aromatase inhibitor suggesting that testosterone treatment improves spatial memory directly and verbal memory after conversion to estrogen (Cherrier et al 2005a). Not all studies have shown positive results (Kenny et al 2004; Lu et al 2005), and variations could be due to the different measures of cognitive abilities that were used and the cognitive state of men at baseline. The data from clinical trials offers evidence that testosterone may be beneficial for certain elements of cognitive function in the aging male with or without cognitive decline. Larger studies are needed to confirm and clarify these effects.
There have been case reports of development of prostate cancer in patients during treatment with testosterone, including one case series of twenty patients (Gaylis et al 2005). It is not known whether this reflects an increase in incidence, as prostate cancer is very common and because the monitoring for cancer in patients treated with testosterone is greater. Randomized controlled trials of testosterone treatment have found a low incidence of prostate cancer and they do not provide evidence of a link between testosterone treatment and the development of prostate cancer (Rhoden and Morgentaler 2004). More large scale clinical trials of longer durations of testosterone replacement are required to confirm that testosterone treatment does not cause prostate cancer. Overall, it is not known whether testosterone treatment of aging males with hypogonadism increases the risk of prostate cancer, but monitoring for the condition is clearly vital. This should take the form of PSA blood test and rectal examination every three months for the first year of treatment and yearly thereafter (Nieschlag et al 2005). Age adjusted PSA reference ranges should be used to identify men who require further assessment. The concept of PSA velocity is also important and refers to the rate of increase in PSA per year. Patients with abnormal rectal examination suggestive of prostate cancer, PSA above the age specific reference range or a PSA velocity greater than 0.75 ng/ml/yr should be referred to a urologist for consideration of prostate biopsy.
It’s perhaps no coincidence that Giacomo Casanova, who was said to eat 50 oysters for breakfast each morning, reportedly bed half of Europe. After all, oysters are brimming with zinc, a mineral that elevates testosterone while simultaneously boosting growth factor hormone—both of which enhance muscle growth and physical performance (in and out of the bedroom).
According to a study in the International Journal of Reproductive BioMedicine, D-Aspartic acid increases testosterone levels in some animals. However, studies that have looked at its effects on humans are inconclusive and mainly of poor quality. The paper says there is an urgent need for more research on this chemical, which occurs naturally in some human tissues.
Glad to be heard. I have been using 10 times the recommended prescription dose of injectable test over the course of 6 years. Yes, 10 times the recommended dose. I use 250 at the lowest and 1000 mgs a week and sometimes 1200 mgs weekly. I am 50 years old. I look better than 90% of the 25 year olds I see in the gym. I have had zero issues. Acne a little , testicle shrinkage maybe 15%. No big deal. My sex drive is on fire. I bench pressed 340 pound today. I weigh 195 pounds and lean and muscles defined and hard as a rock. Doctors in the USA have no clue what they are doing. They read literature and have no experience or facts about test. They prescribe 50 mgs a week. Way short of what we as men need. Everyone is different, but 250mgs weekly is what we need typically. Injectable is the way to go. Gels are a weak joke. My doctor basically told me he was scared to prescribe more than 50 mgs weekly for fear of being sued if something went wrong. I found my own source and have been on top of the world for 6 years. Father died of prostate cancer. Mine prostate is fine. Prostate cancer from test is another example of ignorance in medical field. I am living proof that one can inject 10 times the recommended rate for the better part of a decade with no probs. I do hope the medical field catches up with the times and stops relying on archaic info.
I am 51 male. I have had low T for a few years now. I was using Testim for a few years, but I hated the smell and mostly feared getting thus stuff on the kids. The reason I stopped with all that nasty gel is because my T levels weren’t improving. So, why bother using anything that is not working, so I stopped. Apparently I am one of those men who do not absorb the gel very well. My T levels dropped from a low of around 200 on a 800+ scale to under 100 after I stopped using the gel.

Joe Costello is a Nutrition & Wellness Consultant, certified by the American Fitness Professionals & Associates (AFPA), author, and internet blogger. Joe has more than 9 years of experience in the sports nutrition industry and over 3 years of experience as a supplement and nutrition blogger. As a certified NWC who specializes in dietary supplements, Joe strives to deliver accurate, comprehensive, and research-backed information to his readers. You can find more of Joe’s work including his E-Books about fitness and nutrition at his official website joecostellonwc.com, or connect with him on LinkedIn, Facebook, Instagram, Vimeo, or YouTube.

The authors reported statistically significant increases in both noncalcified and total coronary artery plaque in patients receiving testosterone treatment. Participants’ coronary artery calcium scores, another measure of calcified plaque, were not significantly affected by testosterone treatment. Although these results are potentially a cause for concern, additional studies are required to determine the clinical relevance of this increase in plaque volume.
This paper will aim to review the current evidence of clinical effects of testosterone treatment within an aging male population. As with any other clinical intervention a decision to treat patients with testosterone requires a balance of risk versus benefit. We shall try to facilitate this by examining the effects of testosterone on the various symptoms and organs involved.
Camacho EM1, Huhtaniemi IT, O'Neill TW, Finn JD, Pye SR, Lee DM, Tajar A, Bartfai G, Boonen S, Casanueva FF, Forti G, Giwercman A, Han TS, Kula K, Keevil B, Lean ME, Pendleton N, Punab M, Vanderschueren D, Wu FC; EMAS Group. “Age-associated changes in hypothalamic-pituitary-testicular function in middle-aged and older men are modified by weight change and lifestyle factors: longitudinal results from the European Male Ageing Study.” Eur J Endocrinol. 2013 Feb 20;168(3):445-55. doi: 10.1530/EJE-12-0890. Print 2013 Mar.
Sprinting has been shown numerous times that it has positive effects on testosterone levels. One 2011 study (ref 84) looked at weightlifters who performed 4x35m sprints twice a week. In contrast to the control group (who continued lifting but did not sprint), it was found that “After the 4-week training program, total testosterone and the total testosterone/cortisol ratio increased significantly in the (sprinters) EXP group”.
I've tried other supplements. Which have basically the same ingredients. They had no effect on me. But taking this one. For a month. Well I can't believe it. I haven't been so horny. Like this. In a long time. My girlfriend sees a big difference. It's almost like I want to have sex every day!! In a way that's great. But she has to calm me down. She loves the attention. But she has to cool my jets!! In other ways
Sexual arousal - boosting testosterone can improve sexual arousal, even if you have normal testosterone levels. Higher levels of testosterone can make it easier for you to get aroused and can boost your sex drive generally. While this doesn’t affect the physical action of your erections, if you are not getting hard because you’re not aroused then boosting testosterone could help.
Findings that improvements in serum glucose, serum insulin, insulin resistance or glycemic control, in men treated with testosterone are accompanied by reduced measures of central obesity, are in line with other studies showing a specific effect of testosterone in reducing central or visceral obesity (Rebuffe-Scrive et al 1991; Marin, Holmang et al 1992). Furthermore, studies that have shown neutral effects of testosterone on glucose metabolism have not measured (Corrales et al 2004), or shown neutral effects (Lee et al 2005) (Tripathy et al 1998; Bhasin et al 2005) on central obesity. Given the known association of visceral obesity with insulin resistance, it is possible that testosterone treatment of hypogonadal men acts to improve insulin resistance and diabetes through an effect in reducing central obesity. This effect can be explained by the action of testosterone in inhibiting lipoprotein lipase and thereby reducing triglyceride uptake into adipocytes (Sorva et al 1988), an action which seems to occur preferentially in visceral fat (Marin et al 1995; Marin et al 1996). Visceral fat is thought to be more responsive to hormonal changes due to a greater concentration of androgen receptors and increased vascularity compared with subcutaneous fat (Bjorntorp 1996). Further explanation of the links between hypogonadism and obesity is offered by the hypogonadal-obesity-adipocytokine cycle hypothesis (see Figure 1). In this model, increases in body fat lead to increases in aromatase levels, in addition to insulin resistance, adverse lipid profiles and increased leptin levels. Increased action of aromatase in metabolizing testosterone to estrogen, reduces testosterone levels which induces further accumulation of visceral fat. Higher leptin levels and possibly other factors, act at the pituitary to suppress gonadotrophin release and exacerbate hypogonadism (Cohen 1999; Kapoor et al 2005). Leptin has also been shown to reduce testosterone secretion from rodent testes in vitro (Tena-Sempere et al 1999). A full review of the relationship between testosterone, insulin resistance and diabetes can be found elsewhere (Kapoor et al 2005; Jones 2007).

Miscellaneous: Sleep: (REM sleep) increases nocturnal testosterone levels.[146] Behavior: Dominance challenges can, in some cases, stimulate increased testosterone release in men.[147] Drugs: Natural or man-made antiandrogens including spearmint tea reduce testosterone levels.[148][149][150] Licorice can decrease the production of testosterone and this effect is greater in females.[151]


Tribulus is a herb used in China and India for many centuries, mainly for it’s libido enhancing properties and supposed testosterone boosting properties. It enhances testosterone levels by increasing luteinizing hormone (LH) levels. LH is responsible for “telling” the body to produce testosterone. This herb contains Dioscin, protodioscin, diosgenin. These three organic component stimulate sexual performance and may be useful for a variety of sexual disorders such as low testosterone, low sexual energy and weak erections.
Ashwagandha: One of the hottest herbs out there right now, this adaptogen packs a one-two punch. First, it helps the body fight off stress: According to one Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine study, ashwagandha has a cortisol-lowering effect—a major benefit to anyone who wants their body to be more T-friendly. And, second, it can also support your T-boosting training efforts. One Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition study, for example, found that men who supplemented with ashwagandha saw significantly greater strength and T gains after eight weeks of resistance training than those who took a placebo.
Testosterone may increase competitiveness. Men are known to be a competitive bunch and testosterone is likely responsible for our drive to win. Testosterone is linked with a man’s desire for power and status (Dabbs & Dabbs 2000). Testosterone ramps up before a fight or competition – producing effects on muscle mass and hemoglobin, quickening reactions, improving visual acuity, and increasing your feelings of endurance and indomitability. It also increases your “gameness:” One study showed that a man’s testosterone level after losing a game predicted whether or not he got back in for another round. Men who experienced a severe drop were less likely to play again, while men who experienced little or no drop in T levels got back into the game. Researchers concluded from this observation that T is one of the factors driving competitiveness in men.
The effects of testosterone in humans and other vertebrates occur by way of multiple mechanisms: by activation of the androgen receptor (directly or as DHT), and by conversion to estradiol and activation of certain estrogen receptors.[113][114] Androgens such as testosterone have also been found to bind to and activate membrane androgen receptors.[115][116][117]

If testosterone deficiency occurs during fetal development, then male characteristics may not completely develop. If testosterone deficiency occurs during puberty, a boy’s growth may slow and no growth spurt will be seen. The child may have reduced development of pubic hair, growth of the penis and testes, and deepening of the voice. Around the time of puberty, boys with too little testosterone may also have less than normal strength and endurance, and their arms and legs may continue to grow out of proportion with the rest of their body.

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