The regular intake of testosterone boosters is known for the high level of safety comparing to the hormone injections and the use of illegal steroids. But still to protect yourself against any possible adverse reactions, you should remember that the supplementation can’t be continuous. The breaks from time to time are required. Such an approach to the use of boosters is healthy and best-working if you aspire to enhance own hormone production without any harm.
I have been on both pills and gel.While the pills were much more convenient, the gel seems to work better for me. I feel more focused and clear of mind with gel therapy. I’ve also noticed more sexual interest (closer to levels when younger – now 65) and get ‘harder’ when I do get an erection. The therapy has been good for me emotionally and physically. I’ll stay on it until and if negative signs/symptoms arise.

Findings that improvements in serum glucose, serum insulin, insulin resistance or glycemic control, in men treated with testosterone are accompanied by reduced measures of central obesity, are in line with other studies showing a specific effect of testosterone in reducing central or visceral obesity (Rebuffe-Scrive et al 1991; Marin, Holmang et al 1992). Furthermore, studies that have shown neutral effects of testosterone on glucose metabolism have not measured (Corrales et al 2004), or shown neutral effects (Lee et al 2005) (Tripathy et al 1998; Bhasin et al 2005) on central obesity. Given the known association of visceral obesity with insulin resistance, it is possible that testosterone treatment of hypogonadal men acts to improve insulin resistance and diabetes through an effect in reducing central obesity. This effect can be explained by the action of testosterone in inhibiting lipoprotein lipase and thereby reducing triglyceride uptake into adipocytes (Sorva et al 1988), an action which seems to occur preferentially in visceral fat (Marin et al 1995; Marin et al 1996). Visceral fat is thought to be more responsive to hormonal changes due to a greater concentration of androgen receptors and increased vascularity compared with subcutaneous fat (Bjorntorp 1996). Further explanation of the links between hypogonadism and obesity is offered by the hypogonadal-obesity-adipocytokine cycle hypothesis (see Figure 1). In this model, increases in body fat lead to increases in aromatase levels, in addition to insulin resistance, adverse lipid profiles and increased leptin levels. Increased action of aromatase in metabolizing testosterone to estrogen, reduces testosterone levels which induces further accumulation of visceral fat. Higher leptin levels and possibly other factors, act at the pituitary to suppress gonadotrophin release and exacerbate hypogonadism (Cohen 1999; Kapoor et al 2005). Leptin has also been shown to reduce testosterone secretion from rodent testes in vitro (Tena-Sempere et al 1999). A full review of the relationship between testosterone, insulin resistance and diabetes can be found elsewhere (Kapoor et al 2005; Jones 2007).
Testosterone plays a role in certain behaviors, including aggression and dominance. It also helps to spark competitiveness and boost self-esteem. Just as sexual activity can affect testosterone levels, taking part in competitive activities can cause a man’s testosterone levels to rise or fall. Low testosterone may result in a loss of confidence and lack of motivation. It can also lower a man’s ability to concentrate or cause feelings of sadness. Low testosterone can cause sleep disturbances and lack of energy.
When females have a higher baseline level of testosterone, they have higher increases in sexual arousal levels but smaller increases in testosterone, indicating a ceiling effect on testosterone levels in females. Sexual thoughts also change the level of testosterone but not level of cortisol in the female body, and hormonal contraceptives may affect the variation in testosterone response to sexual thoughts.[51]

Testosterone causes prostate cancer. Since the 1940s, it was commonly believed in the medical field that high testosterone levels were the cause of prostate cancer in men. Doctors reached this conclusion because two scientists in 1941 noticed that prostate cancer regressed in a patient after they castrated him and his T levels subsequently declined. This conclusion was based on the results from a single patient!
This paper will aim to review the current evidence of clinical effects of testosterone treatment within an aging male population. As with any other clinical intervention a decision to treat patients with testosterone requires a balance of risk versus benefit. We shall try to facilitate this by examining the effects of testosterone on the various symptoms and organs involved.
To date, no large, double-blind, randomized controlled studies of a link between testosterone treatment and prostate cancer have been completed. In its 2004 report, the Institute of Medicine (IOM) committee studying the need for clinical trials of testosterone-replacement therapy noted that only 31 placebo-controlled studies had been done in older men, with the largest one enrolling just 108 participants. Most of these studies lasted only six months.

TT may help you but it may have adverse (harmful) results. (See discussion of these side effects below.) The Federal Drug Administration (FDA) has said that testosterone drug labels should state that there is a risk for heart disease and stroke for some men using testosterone products. All men should be checked for heart disease and stroke before, and periodically while on, TT. The AUA however, on careful review of evidence-based peer review literature, has stated that there is no strong evidence that TT either increases or decreases the risk of cardiovascular events.


Vitamin D3: Vitamin D3 is actually more hormone than it is a vitamin. Vitamin D is taken in by around 10% of our diets and D3 is mostly absorbed from the sun, which can be linked to greater testosterone production. The link between the two is a result from the luteinizing hormone playing its role. Read more about how vitamin D3 effects testosterone — the evidence is staggering.
In 2002, the federally sponsored Women’s Health Initiative (WHI) stopped its hormone replacement therapy (HRT) trial (estrogen plus progestin), which included more than 16,000 women, three years early because those taking the pills had an increased risk of developing breast cancer and blood clots, and an increased risk of suffering a stroke or heart attack than those taking a placebo. The findings ran counter to the long-held belief that HRT could preserve health — and trim heart-disease risk in women.
Testosterone is well known as the most critical anabolic, not to mention androgenic, hormone in the body. It’s what separates the men from the boys. Healthy testosterone levels are critical for guys who want to build muscle mass, boost strength, and drop body fat. Testosterone also supports sexual health and gives a competitive edge. It’s truly the alpha hormone.
Consuming high amounts of sugary foods raises your blood glucose levels, which causes your body to release insulin as a response to the raised blood glucose levels. If not managed correctly, the body begins to develop a tolerance to insulin and cannot absorb the sugars in the blood stream as it used to, causing you to become insulin resistant. Being insulin resistant releases cortisol, and as you know, cortisol has extremely negative effects, lowering testosterone by quite a bit.
Every ingredient can be harmful when taken in significant quantities (we go more into that below), so we pored over each booster’s ingredient list to make sure that they weren’t serving up an overdose. In particular, we took a close look at magnesium and zinc, which have enough scientific background behind them to offer hard upper limits on how much you can safely consume.
Some people can get away with more of a barebones approach to boosting their testosterone levels.  MET-Rx Tribulus 750 has been around for years and has been used by many to help get their testosterone levels back within the normal range.  The product has been laboratory tested and has been deemed safe for use by athletes, bodybuilders, and gym rats alike.
A study in the European Journal of Clinical Nutrition that showed drops in cholesterol levels also highlighted the benefits of Fenugreek in controlling glucose levels (this is in fact what the trial was intended to test). When you eat, your glucose levels spike. Fenugreek helps stimulate insulin release to slow down the absorption of sugars in your intestinal tract. Fenugreek might help control blood sugar levels in diabetics.  Furthermore, high glucose levels create a poor environment for testosterone production.  This is why Tim Ferris, in his testosterone diet, advises against consuming sweets and simple starches when you are trying to increase T levels.
Garlic is a very effective food that has been used for centuries in treating various physical ailments including heart problems and respiratory infections. What most people don’t know is that it is also a potent aphrodisiac and very effective in boosting sperm volume. It contains a compound called allicin which improves blood flow to the male sexual organs, increasing sperm production and semen volume.
Some studies have looked at testosterone therapy and cognition. Although the findings weren’t definitive, there was some evidence of cognitive improvement. Other studies have shown that it improves mood. Testosterone therapy has also been shown to be effective in the treatment of osteoporosis and in increasing muscle bulk and strength. [See “Testosterone’s impact on brain, bone, and muscle,” above.]
Testosterone is an anabolic steroid hormone that plays a critical role in metabolism, sex drive, muscle building, mood regulation, memory & cognitive function.  Normal testosterone levels play a huge role in maintaining optimal weight as well as reducing risk of degenerative diseases such as osteoporosis, heart disease, diabetes, & certain cancers (1, 2, 3).
One study that compared athletes to non-active individuals found that supplementing with 22 mg magnesium per pound of body weight of the course of four weeks raised testosterone levels in both groups. And two separate studies, one on a group of men over the age of 65 and a second on a younger 18-30 year old cohort, present the same conclusion: levels of testosterone (and muscle strength) are directly correlated to the levels of magnesium in the body.
The participants were seen every 4 weeks. Blood was taken to measure hormone levels, and questionnaires were given to assess physical function, health status, vitality, and sexual function. Body fat and muscle measurements were also taken at the beginning and end of the 16 weeks. The study was funded in part by NIH’s National Institute on Aging (NIA) and National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK). Results appeared in the September 12, 2013, issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

In addition to its role as a natural hormone, testosterone is used as a medication, for instance in the treatment of low testosterone levels in men and breast cancer in women.[10] Since testosterone levels decrease as men age, testosterone is sometimes used in older men to counteract this deficiency. It is also used illicitly to enhance physique and performance, for instance in athletes.
The hormone also plays a role in sex drive, sperm production, fat distribution, red cell production, and maintenance of muscle strength and mass, according to the Mayo Clinic. For these reasons, testosterone is associated with overall health and well-being in men. One 2008 study published in the journal Frontiers of Hormone Research even linked testosterone to the prevention of osteoporosis in men.

In fact, there is increasing evidence of the potential benefits of testosterone replacement therapy on multiple cardiovascular risk factors. This evidence recently has been comprehensively reviewed by Traish et al. in the Journal of Andrology.16 Although the full effects of testosterone replacement therapy on cardiovascular risk are yet to be established, the balance of emerging evidence from clinical studies suggests that testosterone replacement therapy in hypogonadal men may improve endothelial function, reduce proinflammatory factors, reduce hypertension, and improve the lipid profile.
The medical conditions that cause excess testosterone are rare, argues Drincic. "Many people mistake the symptoms of anabolic steroid abuse with symptoms of high testosterone,” he says. Anabolic steroids, which are sometimes abused by athletes and body builders, are synthetic versions of the male hormone testosterone. They can cause behavior and mood changes that include rage, paranoia, irritability, and poor judgment.

Alterations in mood and depression are a symptom of, but not confined to, hypogonadism.1,6 Outcomes in clinical trials of the effect of testosterone treatment on mood have varied. However, there is evidence that testosterone treatment results in improvements in mood, particularly in older men with hypogonadism.7,8Similarly, although there is an established association between measures of cognitive ability and serum levels of testosterone, the benefits of testosterone treatment on cognition are less clearly established, with some studies reporting improvements in some measures of cognitive function and others failing to detect benefits.6,9-11 Although a potential role for testosterone in protecting cognitive function and preventing Alzheimer’s disease has been proposed by some researchers, confirmation from appropriately-designed clinical trials is awaited.
Testosterone levels generally peak during adolescence and early adulthood. As you get older, your testosterone level gradually declines — typically about 1 percent a year after age 30 or 40. It is important to determine in older men if a low testosterone level is simply due to the decline of normal aging or if it is due to a disease (hypogonadism).
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