There are pills in the United States for testosterone supplementation, but their use is strongly discouraged because they cause significant liver toxicity. A safe oral formulation called testosterone undecanoate is available in Canada and in Europe, but not in the United States. What’s quite exciting is that an injectable version of testosterone undecanoate (Nebido) was submitted to the FDA for approval in August 2007. (It’s already approved in many other countries.) It lasts for 12 weeks, so a patient could come in and get a shot about four times a year. [Editor’s note: In December 2009, the brand name of the drug in the United States was changed to Aveed. As of January 2011, it was still awaiting FDA approval.]
Fortunately supplementation of Vitamin D3 has been noted to significantly boost testosterone levels up to 20%.[40,41] This occurs via a reduction in sex-hormone binding globulin (SHBG) and aromatase expression, which limits the breakdown of testosterone into estrogen. It’s also worth mentioning that Vitamin D3 has been shown to raise levels of the anabolic hormone IGF-1.[42,43]

However, if you have normal testosterone levels and are looking for a boost, for strength gaining purposes, then D-Aspartic acid use may prove less fruitful. A study published in Nutrition Research showed that when the booster was given to men who resistance trained four times a week, their body composition and muscle strength was no different to men who took part in resistance training without the aid of D-Aspartic acid.
TestoGen USA stood head and shoulders above the rest, which is why it earned the top spot on our list. This testosterone supplement will help keep men on a more even keel when it comes to both stamina and temperament. You won’t feel wiped out at the end of the day and you’ll be less likely to feel your tension levels rising as you deal with everyday annoyances. In addition, it will stimulate your libido and can even help you lose excess body fat.
TestoRush is a decent natural testosterone booster with decent ingredients. It’s not nearly as potent as some other higher ranked supplements on this site, and, in reading every review we could find from customers, it appears there’s some negativity towards the company. Read this full TestoRush review and find out how it measures up to other boosters we’ve reviewed. READ THE REVIEW
In non-human primates, it may be that testosterone in puberty stimulates sexual arousal, which allows the primate to increasingly seek out sexual experiences with females and thus creates a sexual preference for females.[39] Some research has also indicated that if testosterone is eliminated in an adult male human or other adult male primate's system, its sexual motivation decreases, but there is no corresponding decrease in ability to engage in sexual activity (mounting, ejaculating, etc.).[39]
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Costs were, in my opinion, very high especially for Axiron. I began reading all the health issues with drugs of this type. I became concerned and stopped using them. I took several over the counter supplements without much success. But recently I purchased from Briland Brands on amazon PaleoTest. I restarted a workout regimen and now feel great both during the workout and after. I can absolutely tell the difference. And it is a fraction of the price of the prescription drugs I took.
Of course, testosterone’s primary function is to bring about secondary sexual characteristics in men. A healthy dose of testosterone is shown to treat conditions such as impotence. Men with fertility issues benefit from increased levels of testosterone in the body. The aging process slows down the rate of testosterone production by the adrenals and testes. It is irreversible and one of the only means to mediate the effects of low testosterone concentration is to include testosterone boosting agents in your regimen.
“We need carbs, fats, and proteins to have optimal T levels,” says Howse. A healthy amount of carbs, for example, keeps cortisol levels low (more on why this is important to come). Meanwhile, dietary fats produce cholesterol, which our body can later convert into testosterone. And, finally, protein supports body composition by enhancing muscle repair and growth and increasing satiety.
There have been a number of smaller studies on men receiving testosterone-replacement therapy, and if you look at the results cumulatively, the rate of prostate cancer in these men was about 1% per year. If you look at men who show up for prostate cancer screening, same sort of age population, the rate tends to be about the same. You have to be cautious in comparing studies and combining the results, but there’s no signal in these results that testosterone-replacement therapy creates an unexpectedly high rate of prostate cancer.
If men’s brain, muscles, and bones are being affected daily due to low testosterone, and it is what makes men, men, why aren’t we doing more about this serious health problem? Could there be a political correctness crept in the scientific community that is hindering newly invigorated research in this area? I thought that scientific inquiry suppose to go where the evidence leads. It appears that some honest experts are opening their eyes to this truth.
While steroids like DHEA can be used to boost testosterone, if used in the wrong dosages or by people who don’t need them they can raise T-levels far beyond the normal range, which is what causes accelerated muscle gain. According to Dr. Emil Hodzovic, who is a competitive bodybuilder as well as a doctor with Medichecks, steroids come with “a set of risks, including liver damage, hormone imbalance, high blood pressure, and a higher risk of a stroke or heart attack”.
The partial synthesis in the 1930s of abundant, potent testosterone esters permitted the characterization of the hormone's effects, so that Kochakian and Murlin (1936) were able to show that testosterone raised nitrogen retention (a mechanism central to anabolism) in the dog, after which Allan Kenyon's group[190] was able to demonstrate both anabolic and androgenic effects of testosterone propionate in eunuchoidal men, boys, and women. The period of the early 1930s to the 1950s has been called "The Golden Age of Steroid Chemistry",[191] and work during this period progressed quickly. Research in this golden age proved that this newly synthesized compound—testosterone—or rather family of compounds (for many derivatives were developed from 1940 to 1960), was a potent multiplier of muscle, strength, and well-being.[192]

TT may help you but it may have adverse (harmful) results. (See discussion of these side effects below.) The Federal Drug Administration (FDA) has said that testosterone drug labels should state that there is a risk for heart disease and stroke for some men using testosterone products. All men should be checked for heart disease and stroke before, and periodically while on, TT. The AUA however, on careful review of evidence-based peer review literature, has stated that there is no strong evidence that TT either increases or decreases the risk of cardiovascular events.
Shilajit in its natural state has no chemical definition. In order to yield a consistent and efficacious form of shilajit, the shilajit is obtained from carefully selected rocks and is put through a patented technology where it is purified and standardized. This form of shilajit is now assured of optimal levels of bioactive components such as fulvic acid and dibenzo-pyrones, and is known as the patented PrimaVie.
Increased testosterone can have an impact on body composition. Possible benefits include gains in lean muscle mass, reduced body fat and increased bone density. Testosterone inhibits uptake of triglycerides and increases lipid mobilization from adipose tissue, and the increase or decrease of testosterone will usually have an inverse effect on fat stores, with higher testosterone generally causing a decrease in body fat. "The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism" published a study in 2007 that showed decreases in body fat and increases in lean mass in HIV-positive obese men given testosterone therapy. In 1989, a study of the effects of testosterone on muscle mass at the University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry suggests that increasing testosterone increases protein synthesis in muscles. Body composition changes from increased testosterone were also demonstrated in a 1999 study at the School of Exercise Science and Sports Management, Southern Cross University in Australia performed on male weight-training subjects, which showed increases in arm girth and body weight and decreased body fat following a 12-week cycle of testosterone enanthate.
As a nurse I am very concerned with following my labs as most of these places don’t actually follow my labs. I also happen to have the side effect of polycythemia and donate 2-3 times a year for this reason. At one point I asked my doctor who referred me to a urologist. At the time I was on 150mg IM with half a dose or 0.5mL twice weekly to avoid the “roller coaster”. Anyways, I went there so I could get some concrete answers as to why I was having low T, this doctor all but threw me out of his office stating that “they” are making me dependent on T. As a professional in the medical field I was highly offended, he didn’t even speak with me about anything at all, I had no chance to ask what was going on, if my dosing was correct or if there was anything else I needed to do. He kicked me out and said he wasn’t even charging for the visit. Absolutely applaud. So to those who have found a Dr. that actually listens and works with your individual issues, kuddos. To the rest of us I highly recommend that you research as much as possible before using out of state clinics.
I’ve been reading all these comments and replies here. This was a great article and if it does anything, it should stimulate you to talk to your physician. Your Dr. can take blood and have it annylized, then prescribe the proper direction to take. A lot of people here have been giving free advice, but who knows your system best? Am I going to take advice from someone who doesn’t know anything other than the symptoms I present? I’m not, but what if I’m allergic?
“She” being the key word. I had to quit a female doc because even though my level was down to 200, she thought I just needed more vitamin D! When I tried that and came back a few weeks later and told her there was no change in how I felt she refused to order another blood test, and after that wouldn’t even see me. I would never trust a female doctor with testosterone replacement therapy, as they all seem to have the same shit attitude from what my friends have told me, they treat it like it’s not a real thing even though you better bow down and kiss their asses when it comes to breast cancer and menopause.
But can testosterone replacement therapy help with heart disease? Study results are mixed. Small studies in the early 2000s found that men with heart disease who underwent testosterone therapy saw only slight improvements. Some were able to increase their walking distance by 33 percent. Another study found that hormone therapy only widened healthy arteries but had no effect on angina pain.

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When I first started TRT, my physician prescribed a cream that you rub into your skin. The cream version of TRT is not too convenient, because if someone touches you while you have the cream on, the testosterone can rub off on him/her. This can be really bad around kids or pregnant women. If you’re sleeping next to someone, the cream can get on the sheets and transfer over that way, too. The cream can be annoying, but it works. There’s also a gel version called AndroGel; I skipped it because it doesn’t absorb as well as the cream does.
How is it that women for many years have had HRT available and it is common place and acceptable for them? Men are expected to just have a decline and when they start to look into this, immediately they are looked at as they just want to do steroids. This is not the case for any of the comments I have read. I too simply like having my levels where they should be and if taken for this reason should be common place just as it is for estrogen replacement in women.
Testosterone levels generally peak during adolescence and early adulthood. As you get older, your testosterone level gradually declines — typically about 1 percent a year after age 30 or 40. It is important to determine in older men if a low testosterone level is simply due to the decline of normal aging or if it is due to a disease (hypogonadism).
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