Testosterone is indisputably the king of hormones when it comes to the gym. While it’s responsible for reproductive development, it’s better known for its major role in promoting muscle growth, increasing bone density, and even how body fat is distributed. Testosterone levels are also a huge influencer in terms of overall health and emotional state. With age, however, natural testosterone production naturally declines, leading to higher levels of body fat and more difficulty building muscle, not to mention a decrease in libido.
The effects of testosterone in humans and other vertebrates occur by way of multiple mechanisms: by activation of the androgen receptor (directly or as DHT), and by conversion to estradiol and activation of certain estrogen receptors.[113][114] Androgens such as testosterone have also been found to bind to and activate membrane androgen receptors.[115][116][117]
Started HRT in my early 50’s as I had all the low-T symptoms and Type 2 Diabetes, which was hammering my body. My total T was about 100 (not sure about Free at that point). First started with Androgel, and was getting decent symptomatic improvement, but didn’t like the residue from the cream, and traveling with the creams was a problem. I’ve gone to pellet implants for the past 7 years. Every 4-5 months, very happy with results to date.
Testosterone booster supplements are supplements that are used to either increase the amount of testosterone in someone’s body or increase the amount that can be used by the body without being converted into a different type of hormone. While it is a male sex hormone, women also produce some testosterone. People with low testosterone levels and some athletes choose to use testosterone booster supplements to increase their muscle mass, reduce their fat stores, strengthen their bones, and improve their sex drives, particularly as they approach middle age.
I’ve been on testosterone replacement for over 3 years and at first I did the shots and my mood swings were ridiculous, my skin broke out on my chest and shoulders, and my henatocrit went to 55%. I finally got fed up with doing shots every two weeks and switched to Gel and it’s been so much better. It actually increases my levels which is rare for most men. I do 12.5 mg, three pumps a day, and this keeps My level between 500 and 600. My hematocrit is 48.5 and no mood swings.

Attention, memory, and spatial ability are key cognitive functions affected by testosterone in humans. Preliminary evidence suggests that low testosterone levels may be a risk factor for cognitive decline and possibly for dementia of the Alzheimer's type,[104][105][106][107] a key argument in life extension medicine for the use of testosterone in anti-aging therapies. Much of the literature, however, suggests a curvilinear or even quadratic relationship between spatial performance and circulating testosterone,[108] where both hypo- and hypersecretion (deficient- and excessive-secretion) of circulating androgens have negative effects on cognition.
Benefits: Tongkat Ali works by stimulating the pituitary glands and hypothalamus glands to produce natural testosterone past it’s peak. It also blocks excessive cortisol production. Cortisol turns excessive testosterone into estrogen. Ingredients in the Tongkat ali allows the body to produce testosterone at a steady rate to increase free testosterone while lowering cortisol.
What are the side effects of testosterone pellets? Testosterone is the male sex hormone, and its levels in the body decline steadily with age. Many people wish to supplement it when they are deficient. Testosterone pellets can be a convenient form of testosterone replacement therapy, but they can cause side effects, such as fluid retention and acne. Learn more here. Read now
My genetic make-up is 47XXY. I was diagnosed in September, 1976, and have been on some kind of T-therapy since – injections, pills, gels, patches, pellets, now back on injections. At this time, now, I inject 1/2cc deep IM, every 7-8 days. I suffered a blood clot between my knee and my groin (right leg) in January, 2017. I am now on Eliquis through June, 2017. My blood has always been quick to coagulate. I’ve read through all of this, and only found mention of blood clots sporadically in relation to T-therapy. I’m 70 yoa, have never had a problem before. Can you give me any info I can pass along to my doctor? Thank you.

Articles and information on this website may only be copied, reprinted, or redistributed with written permission (but please ask, we like to give written permission!) The purpose of this Blog is to encourage the free exchange of ideas. The entire contents of this website is based upon the opinions of Dave Asprey, unless otherwise noted. Individual articles are based upon the opinions of the respective authors, who may retain copyright as marked. The information on this website is not intended to replace a one-on-one relationship with a qualified health care professional and is not intended as medical advice. It is intended as a sharing of knowledge and information from the personal research and experience of Dave Asprey and the community. We will attempt to keep all objectionable messages off this site; however, it is impossible to review all messages immediately. All messages expressed on The Bulletproof Forum or the Blog, including comments posted to Blog entries, represent the views of the author exclusively and we are not responsible for the content of any message.


Many clinical studies have looked at the effect of testosterone treatment on body composition in hypogonadal men or men with borderline low testosterone levels. Some of these studies specifically examine these changes in older men (Tenover 1992; Morley et al 1993; Urban et al 1995; Sih et al 1997; Snyder et al 1999; Kenny et al 2001; Ferrando et al 2002; Steidle et al 2003; Page et al 2005). The data from studies, on patients from all age groups, are consistent in showing an increase in fat free mass and decrease in fat mass or visceral adiposity with testosterone treatment. A recent meta-analysis of 16 randomized controlled trials of testosterone treatment effects on body composition confirms this pattern (Isidori et al 2005). There have been less consistent results with regard to the effects of testosterone treatment of muscle strength. Some studies have shown an increase in muscle strength (Ferrando et al 2002; Page et al 2005) with testosterone whilst others have not (Snyder et al 1999). Within the same trial some muscle group strengths may improve whilst others do not (Ly et al 2001). It is likely that the differences are partly due to the methodological variations in assessing strength, but it also possible that testosterone has different effects on the various muscle groups. The meta-analysis found trends toward significant improvements in dominant knee and hand grip strength only (Isidori et al 2005).
Testosterone may decrease your chances of Alzheimer’s Disease. Several studies have linked low testosterone levels to an increased risk of Alzheimer’s disease.  In a 2010 study by the University of Hong Kong, researchers studied 153 Chinese men who were recruited from social centers. They were at least 55 years and older, lived in the community, and didn’t have dementia. Of those men, 47 had mild cognitive impairment — or problems with clear thinking and memory loss.
If you haven’t hit your twenties yet then you probably can’t imagine losing your interest in sex. I feel you, Holmes.  At 26, I have a healthy appetite now (partially because I consciously work on elevating my T) but it’s nowhere near where it was when I was 17.  I imagine that things will only get worse by the time I’m 35 which is why it’s important to learn what gets your motor firing now.
There is a large body of evidence linking the onset and/or progression of cardiovascular disease to low testosterone levels in men. It is now apparent that an increased cardiovascular risk and accelerated development of atherosclerosis occurs not only in elderly men or men with obesity or type 2 diabetes mellitus, but also in non-obese men with hypogonadism.14 Current best evidence from systematic review of randomized controlled trials suggests that testosterone use in hypogonadal men is relatively safe in terms of cardiovascular health and do not produce unfavorable elevations in blood pressure or glycemic control, and does not adversely effect lipid profiles.4,15
I need an answer regarding getting testoroene after having your Prostate removed. I had my Prostate removed 3 months ago and my PSA levels are zero. I want to go back on testoroene because I felt great when I was on it before having my prostate taken out. I am 44 years old and I workout 4-5 days a week hard. I am in excellent shape and I didn’t have any symptoms of prostate cancer other then my PSA levels went up.
I was depressed, getting fat, and zero libido. My doc did a full blood work up. My Total Testosterone level was 289 ng/dl. He offered TRT but I declined because I knew, at 53, that if I went on TRT my own testosterone production would shut down and at my age I would have a pretty difficult time kick starting it up again. I researched and researched for about a month. I started on Vitamin D 10,000 iu per day ( I knew this was a safe amount because I tested at 26ng/dl and optimum level is anywhere between 40-80ng/dl. I also took 1,200 mg of magnesium, 9mg of Boron and Vitamin K Complex. Tested again 3 months later and blood work showed I was at 720.
A: Testosterone production declines naturally with age. Low testosterone, or testosterone deficiency (TD), may result from disease or damage to the hypothalamus, pituitary gland, or testicles that inhibits hormone secretion and testosterone production. Treatment involves hormone replacement therapy. The method of delivery is determined by age and duration of deficiency. Oral testosterone, Testred (methyltestosterone), is associated with liver toxicity and liver tumors and so is prescribed sparingly. Transdermal delivery with a testosterone patch is becoming the most common method of treatment for testosterone deficiency in adults. A patch is worn, either on the scrotum or elsewhere on the body, and testosterone is released through the skin at controlled intervals. Patches are typically worn for 12 or 24 hours and can be worn during exercise, bathing, and strenuous activity. Two transdermal patches that are available are Androderm (nonscrotal) and Testoderm (scrotal). The Androderm patch is applied to the abdomen, lower back, thigh, or upper arm and should be applied at the same time every evening between 8 p.m. and midnight. If the patch falls off before noon, replace it with a fresh patch until it is time to reapply a new patch that evening. If the patch falls off after noon, do not replace it until you reapply a new patch that evening. The most common side effects associated with transdermal patch therapy include itching, discomfort, and irritation at the site of application. Some men may experience fluid retention, acne, and temporary abnormal breast development (gynecosmastia). AndroGel and Testim are transdermal gels that are applied once daily to the clean dry skin of the upper arms or abdomen. When used properly, these gels deliver testosterone for 24 hours. The gel must be allowed to dry on the skin before dressing and must be applied at least 6 hours before showering or swimming. Gels cannot be applied to the genitals. AndroGel is available in a metered-dose pump, which allows physicians to adjust the dosage of the medication. Side effects of transdermal gels include adverse reactions at the site of application, acne, headache, and hair loss (alopecia). For more specific information on treatments for low testosterone, consult with your doctor or pharmacist for guidance based on current health condition. Kimberly Hotz, PharmD
Our bodies make testosterone while we sleep. In one study, men who got five hours of sleep a night had testosterone levels 10 to 15 percent lower than when they got a solid eight hours. The study, conducted by the University of Chicago, found that skimping on sleep reduced the men’s T levels by an amount equivalent to aging 10 or more years. While it can be challenging to change your sleep habits, says Natasha Turner, ND, you can “start going to bed 15 minutes earlier each week until you reach your target time.”

Before we go any further, know that fenugreek is an herb of Asian origin, commonly used in Indian cuisine.  The Indians have been consuming it as an aphrodisiac and an herbal cure-all for centuries which might explain why that waiter in your local Indian restaurant is always smiling. As it turns out, there is actually some validity to the purported claims.

On the average, you need to sleep at least 8 hours per night to stay healthy. If you want a night sleep to contribute to the maximum testosterone production, it’s important to make your sleep comfortable. Thus, the bedroom temperature shouldn’t exceed 21°C. In addition, you should ventilate your bedroom thoroughly before sleeping. Furthermore, before going to bed, don’t overload your stomach with fatty foods, as well as don’t drink alcohol and caffeinated beverages. Finally, you have to avoid intense physical activity before bedtime.6
The body’s endocrine system consists of glands that manufacture hormones. The hypothalamus, located in the brain, tells the pituitary gland how much testosterone the body needs. The pituitary gland then sends the message to the testicles. Most testosterone is produced in the testicles, but small amounts come from the adrenal glands, which are located just above the kidneys. In women, the adrenal glands and ovaries produce small amounts of testosterone.
Saw palmetto: Uses, dosage, and side effects Saw palmetto is an extract from the berries of a type of palm tree. The berries have traditionally been used to ease urinary and reproductive problems. The extract is now used in herbal remedies to stabilize testosterone. Learn about its use, its effectiveness, the science behind the claims, and any side effects. Read now
×