The research conducted by the American scientists has proven that this plant has a great potential to raise serum lactate, improve sports performance, enhance muscle strength, increase oxygen supply to the body tissues, maintain heart health, boost memory and concentration, restore work capacity, normalize homeostasis, and make the reaction time to a variety of visual and auditory stimuli much longer.3
The science backs up the soldier’s self discovery, in fact, exposure to radiation (whether it’s from an army radar or the cell phone in your pocket, or the wifi router in your house) has been shown to lower sperm quality, fertility and testosterone. This is true not only for military personnel (88, 89,90) but all males living in a modern world (91).
Vitamin D is arguably the most important vitamin when it comes to testosterone. A study published in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology examined the relationship between vitamin D supplementation and testosterone levels in men. The authors found that participants with higher levels of vitamin D had significantly higher levels of free testosterone compared to those with insufficient levels of vitamin D.8 Based on these study results, it appears vitamin D has a strong relationship with testosterone levels.
Bushey, Brandon; Taylor, Lem W.; Wilborn, Colin W.; Poole, Chris; Foster, Cliffa A.; Campbell, Bill; Kreider, Richard B. and Willoughby, Darryn S. (2009). “Fenugreek Extract Supplementation Has No effect on the Hormonal Profile of Resitance-Trained Males” International Journal of Exercise Science: Conference Abstract Submissions: Vol. 2: Iss. 1, Article 13.

Shilajit in its natural state has no chemical definition. In order to yield a consistent and efficacious form of shilajit, the shilajit is obtained from carefully selected rocks and is put through a patented technology where it is purified and standardized. This form of shilajit is now assured of optimal levels of bioactive components such as fulvic acid and dibenzo-pyrones, and is known as the patented PrimaVie.
When patients ask about risks, I remind them that they already have testosterone in their system and that the goal of testosterone treatment is to restore its concentration back to what it was 10 or 15 years previously. And the molecule itself that we give is identical to the one that their bodies make naturally, so in theory, everything should be hunky-dory. But in practice, there are always some curveballs.

Cardiovascular disease, and its underlying pathological process atherosclerosis, is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in the developed and developing world. Coronary heart disease in particular is the commonest cause of death worldwide (AHA 2002; MacKay and Mensah 2004). As well as increasing with age, this disease is more common in the male versus female population internationally, which has led to interest in the potential role of sex hormones in modulating risk of development of atherosclerosis. Concerns about the potential adverse effects of testosterone treatment on cardiovascular disease have previously contributed to caution in prescribing testosterone to those who have, or who are at risk of, cardiovascular disease. Contrary to fears of the potential adverse effects of testosterone on cardiovascular disease, there are over forty epidemiological studies which have examined the relationship of testosterone levels to the presence or development of coronary heart disease, and none have shown a positive correlation. Many of these studies have found the presence of coronary heart disease to be associated with low testosterone levels (Reviews: Jones, Jones et al 2003; Jones et al 2005).


A related issue is the potential use of testosterone as a coronary vasodilator and anti-anginal agent. Testosterone has been shown to act as a vasodilator of coronary arteries at physiological concentrations during angiography (Webb, McNeill et al 1999). Furthermore men given a testosterone injection prior to exercise testing showed improved performance, as assessed by ST changes compared to placebo (Rosano et al 1999; Webb, Adamson et al 1999). Administration of one to three months of testosterone treatment has also been shown to improve symptoms of angina and exercise test performance (Wu and Weng 1993; English et al 2000; Malkin, Pugh, Morris et al 2004). Longer term studies are underway. It is thought that testosterone improves angina due its vasodilatory action, which occurs independently of the androgen receptor, via blockade of L-type calcium channels at the cell membrane of the vascular smooth muscle in an action similar to the dihydropyridine calcium-channel blockers such as nifedipine (Hall et al 2006).

If you’re an older man with low testosterone and interested in taking testosterone, this decision should be carefully considered with your physician. Your physician will be able to better assess the balance of your conditions and whether hormone replacement could put you at potential risk. It's a bad idea for anybody to engage in hormone supplementation without the supervision of a physician. Just because hormones occur naturally in the body does not mean that they can be taken without negative effects.
For facts sake I am 51yr old male and I am fat. I do have a large and muscular fat, but I also have a good amount of at on top of that. My body shape is not the typical huge “beer belly” gut that is hard and dangerous, rather, I am fat all over proportionally, but still considered obese. The fat on my body and around my middle is quite soft compared to male friends who have those large and hard bellies. Still, my doctor and reading indicate that fat has an effect on T potentially lowering the overall level that my T would be if I lost a good amount of that fat.

I am 41, T was tested at 400 last month. I was Very active /hyper growing up. I have felt my strength and energy fade over the last 10 years to the point that i now take a nap in the afternoon. Sexual performance has been on a steep decline since 35 to the point of disfunction with out herbal pills or cialis. Also had 2 kids in last 5 years,(second marriage) , and at times have a hard time tolerating the stresses due to lack of energy to cope with the increased emotional load.

Hypogonadism is a disease in which the body is unable to produce normal amounts of testosterone due to a problem with the testicles or with the pituitary gland that controls the testicles. Testosterone replacement therapy can improve the signs and symptoms of low testosterone in these men. Doctors may prescribe testosterone as injections, pellets, patches or gels.
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