A: According to the NIH, normal values for testosterone levels in men can range from 300 to 1,200ng/dL. There can be many different causes of low testosterone including age, diseases, accidents, and medications. Symptoms of low testosterone may include: loss of sex drive, erectile dysfunction, depressed mood, and difficulty concentrating. Low testosterone levels may also bring around body changes including: hair loss, decrease in blood cells possibly leading to anemia, fragile bones, and a decrease in muscle mass. There are different testosterone replacement therapies including patches, such as Androderm; gels, such as Androgel and Testim; and injections, such as testosterone cypionate. Only your health care provider can decide if and what kind of testosterone replacement therapy is appropriate for you. Testosterone replacement therapy is not right for everyone. Patient with certain prostate issues or breast cancer should not take testosterone. For more specific information, consult with your doctor for guidance based on your health status and current medications, particularly before taking any action. Kristen Dore, PharmD

We also have epidemiologic studies, like the Physicians’ Health Study, the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging, and the Massachusetts Male Aging Study, that include tens of thousands of men who are followed for 5, 10, 15, or even 20 years. At the end of the study period, the researchers see who developed prostate cancer and who didn’t. They can then look at blood samples taken at the start of the study to see if, for example, the group that got prostate cancer had a higher level of testosterone over all. About 500,000 men have been entered in some 20 trials of this type around the world. Not one of those studies has shown a definitive correlation between prostate cancer and total testosterone. Three or four have shown weak associations, but none of those have been confirmed in subsequent studies.
The researchers found that the dose of testosterone required to produce different effects in the body varied widely. The influence of testosterone and estradiol also differed. As the testosterone gel dose was reduced, the scientists showed, reductions in lean mass, muscle size, and leg-press strength resulted from decreases in testosterone itself. In contrast, increases in body fat were due to the related declines in estradiol. Both testosterone and estradiol levels were associated with libido and erectile function.
Testosterone, historically believed to be important only for male sexual function, has over the past decades transformed from niche hormone to multi-system player.22 There is increasing recognition of the harmful consequences of hypogonadism (also known as testosterone deficiency) wide spectrum of beneficial health effects of testosterone therapy and.23, 24 

D-AA:  D-Aspartic Acid has been known to increase libido and sex drive as well as fertility in infertile men. D-AA was the craze a few years back but the issue found was that after a month of use, the results started to diminish.  Also, if you currently have normal levels of testosterone, D-AA won’t do much good for you in terms of an increase in T-levels. 

In 2002, the federally sponsored Women’s Health Initiative (WHI) stopped its hormone replacement therapy (HRT) trial (estrogen plus progestin), which included more than 16,000 women, three years early because those taking the pills had an increased risk of developing breast cancer and blood clots, and an increased risk of suffering a stroke or heart attack than those taking a placebo. The findings ran counter to the long-held belief that HRT could preserve health — and trim heart-disease risk in women.
More can be learned from a large, randomized, placebo-controlled trial of finasteride treatment in 18,800 men aged 55 or more. Finasteride is a 5α-reductase inhibitor which acts to prevent the metabolism of testosterone to dihydrotestosterone (DHT) – the most active androgen in the prostate. The trial showed a greater overall incidence of prostate cancer in the control group, but men treated with finasteride were more likely to have high grade tumors (Thompson et al 2003), suggesting that reduced androgen exposure of the prostate may delay the presentation of prostate cancer and/or promote advanced disease in some other way.
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A couple years ago I was having a problem with my thighs burning when walking up stairs. I noticed the muscles in my legs looking smaller. So I had my doc to check my T levels , and it was under 100. So she started me on testosterone injections weekly 200mg . After several injections I felt great , muscles in legs came back , lots of energy everything good . Leveled out at 3 injections a week 100mg , had a T level of 550 . So I go in for my scheduled injection and they tell me there out of testosterone . I might mention, this is a health care facilility that gives financial assistant if needed. And they have 3 or doctors and a nurse practitioner, which was who I was seeing . So I went on to check back often and got the same reply , were out of supply . So finally after months of the same , I gave up . I started loosing wait and my nerves got bad . Was having panic attacks etc. but I was coming off Prozac at the same time so I blamed it all on that. I was so bad with my nerves I ended up in the ER while on vacation . Doc there put me on a med for stress which I’m still using . After close to a year I checked back with the place I was getting TRT and they were resupplyed with testosterone. So I started back up because of low sex drive and ED. My first injection of 200mg was just short of a Marical , nerves felt great ED gone , had a sex drive , lot of energy . Then after 7 days or so all gone bad nerves started back up . He had me scheduled for anouther injection in 4 weeks 100mg . I went in for injection and after a couple days started feeling a little better . Then same thing as before about 7 days later nerves and everything else as before got worse . 3 weeks later I finally got a appt. with this different doc then I use to have . Told him the problems I was having , which included a horrible down mood , no energy . He decided to start injections every 2 weeks and upped the dose slitley. It’s been 5 days and already noticing ED problem reaccuring . He’s worried about the threat of prostate cancer. And doesn’t want to add any more injection to the schedule. I guess I’m going to have to start seeing the nurse practitioner who seemed to be more liberal and informed about TRT. I feel once a week injection is what it will take to get feeling good again. I’m 57 now with good health . Just need to get my T level on track with a doctor that will listen to how his patient is feeling . My last T level was at 365 . I failed to mention before I started the injections I was on androgel Dailey , 5 pumps a day . Then he gave me the injection of 200mg test . That’s when I felt fantastic for about a week or so . Then down hill . And I wanted to switch because the injection just seem so much better and they are . I noticed a big difference.
It may also become a treatment for anemia, bone density and strength problems. In a 2017 study published in the journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA), testosterone treatments corrected anemia in older men with low testosterone levels better than a placebo. Another 2017 study published in JAMA found that older men with low testosterone had increased bone strength and density after treatment when compared with a placebo. 
So if you’re intent on maximizing your testosterone levels, and/or you have applied all of the above and you’re still not satisfied with your results (which would be surprising) then you could try the below. I will point out that some of these tips may not have the scientific evidence to back them up like the previous points, but I can assure you that either I have or do use them (and have positive results), or a client has used them with pleasing results, or finally it is such a new conception that there isn’t enough evidence to prove it one way or another.

*IMPORTANT TESTOSTERONE TREATMENT WARNING: Who Should Not Enroll in Testosterone Replacement Therapy? Men who have or had prostate cancer or breast cancer should not take testosterone replacement therapy. All men considering treatment should undergo a thorough prostate cancer screening prior to starting any therapy program with a rectal exam and PSA test. *Men who have or have had cardiovascular disease, or are at risk for coronary disease, or have had a history of heart disease may not be candidates for testosterone treatment. Blood testing, thorough physical examination and careful screening by your physician is absolutely essential before considering a hormone therapy program of any kind. Always discuss the potential benefits, uses, side effects and risks of prescription hormones and steroid drugs with your treating physician. Hormone Treatment is for medically qualified candidates only. The FDA has cautions about using testosterone products for low testosterone due to aging; requires labeling change to inform of possible increased risk of heart attack and stroke with use - FDA Testosterone Safety Update
I turned 50 and noticed I had low energy and no desire to workout. I decided to try a testosterone enhancer. I bought these and upon taking them I felt immediate results. I then ordered 3 more bottles on the spot. It is truly amazing how much of a difference it has made in my strength and endurance. Not to mention stamina. I never would've guessed that anything would have such a noticeable positive effect on strength and energy. I am so impressed.

A couple years ago I was having a problem with my thighs burning when walking up stairs. I noticed the muscles in my legs looking smaller. So I had my doc to check my T levels , and it was under 100. So she started me on testosterone injections weekly 200mg . After several injections I felt great , muscles in legs came back , lots of energy everything good . Leveled out at 3 injections a week 100mg , had a T level of 550 . So I go in for my scheduled injection and they tell me there out of testosterone . I might mention, this is a health care facilility that gives financial assistant if needed. And they have 3 or doctors and a nurse practitioner, which was who I was seeing . So I went on to check back often and got the same reply , were out of supply . So finally after months of the same , I gave up . I started loosing wait and my nerves got bad . Was having panic attacks etc. but I was coming off Prozac at the same time so I blamed it all on that. I was so bad with my nerves I ended up in the ER while on vacation . Doc there put me on a med for stress which I’m still using . After close to a year I checked back with the place I was getting TRT and they were resupplyed with testosterone. So I started back up because of low sex drive and ED. My first injection of 200mg was just short of a Marical , nerves felt great ED gone , had a sex drive , lot of energy . Then after 7 days or so all gone bad nerves started back up . He had me scheduled for anouther injection in 4 weeks 100mg . I went in for injection and after a couple days started feeling a little better . Then same thing as before about 7 days later nerves and everything else as before got worse . 3 weeks later I finally got a appt. with this different doc then I use to have . Told him the problems I was having , which included a horrible down mood , no energy . He decided to start injections every 2 weeks and upped the dose slitley. It’s been 5 days and already noticing ED problem reaccuring . He’s worried about the threat of prostate cancer. And doesn’t want to add any more injection to the schedule. I guess I’m going to have to start seeing the nurse practitioner who seemed to be more liberal and informed about TRT. I feel once a week injection is what it will take to get feeling good again. I’m 57 now with good health . Just need to get my T level on track with a doctor that will listen to how his patient is feeling . My last T level was at 365 . I failed to mention before I started the injections I was on androgel Dailey , 5 pumps a day . Then he gave me the injection of 200mg test . That’s when I felt fantastic for about a week or so . Then down hill . And I wanted to switch because the injection just seem so much better and they are . I noticed a big difference.


Testosterone may prove to be an effective treatment in female sexual arousal disorders,[52] and is available as a dermal patch. There is no FDA approved androgen preparation for the treatment of androgen insufficiency; however, it has been used off-label to treat low libido and sexual dysfunction in older women. Testosterone may be a treatment for postmenopausal women as long as they are effectively estrogenized.[52]
A: Testosterone is the male androgen, or sex hormone. It controls too many things to list here. While it does help regulate mood, sex drive, and metabolism, it does this by working in tandem with other hormones in your body. It's produced by the male testes and the adrenal glands. For more information, go to //www.everydayhealth.com/drugs/testosterone. Matt Curley, PharmD
The medical conditions that cause excess testosterone are rare, argues Drincic. "Many people mistake the symptoms of anabolic steroid abuse with symptoms of high testosterone,” he says. Anabolic steroids, which are sometimes abused by athletes and body builders, are synthetic versions of the male hormone testosterone. They can cause behavior and mood changes that include rage, paranoia, irritability, and poor judgment.

ZMA (unnecessary). So when I researched how to increase testosterone, a supplement called ZMA kept popping up. It’s a blend of zinc, magnesium, and vitamin B6. The purported benefits of ZMA include better and deeper sleep which indirectly is supposed to increase testosterone. Zinc and magnesium are necessary minerals in testosterone production, so a mega-dose should be useful, right? Well, no. I bought some and took it during the duration of experiment. I should have done some more research before I made the purchase. While one study in 1998 showed increased strength among athletes taking ZMA, two recent studies (study 1, study 2) have shown that it has absolutely no effect on total or free testosterone levels. Crap. My advice, unless you have a zinc and magnesium deficiency, no need to waste your money on this.


These researchers took saliva samples from recreational women athletes before and after playing 10 minutes of flag football. The data showed that this short, intense burst of competitive sport triggered the immediate release of testosterone. Interestingly, the subjects' mental state also contributed to the data. Self-rated performance scores were directly related to testosterone levels.
Testosterone is used as a medication for the treatment of males with too little or no natural testosterone production, certain forms of breast cancer,[10] and gender dysphoria in transgender men. This is known as hormone replacement therapy (HRT) or testosterone replacement therapy (TRT), which maintains serum testosterone levels in the normal range. Decline of testosterone production with age has led to interest in androgen replacement therapy.[109] It is unclear if the use of testosterone for low levels due to aging is beneficial or harmful.[110]
A: Testosterone is the male androgen, or sex hormone. It controls too many things to list here. While it does help regulate mood, sex drive, and metabolism, it does this by working in tandem with other hormones in your body. It's produced by the male testes and the adrenal glands. For more information, go to //www.everydayhealth.com/drugs/testosterone. Matt Curley, PharmD
There have been case reports of development of prostate cancer in patients during treatment with testosterone, including one case series of twenty patients (Gaylis et al 2005). It is not known whether this reflects an increase in incidence, as prostate cancer is very common and because the monitoring for cancer in patients treated with testosterone is greater. Randomized controlled trials of testosterone treatment have found a low incidence of prostate cancer and they do not provide evidence of a link between testosterone treatment and the development of prostate cancer (Rhoden and Morgentaler 2004). More large scale clinical trials of longer durations of testosterone replacement are required to confirm that testosterone treatment does not cause prostate cancer. Overall, it is not known whether testosterone treatment of aging males with hypogonadism increases the risk of prostate cancer, but monitoring for the condition is clearly vital. This should take the form of PSA blood test and rectal examination every three months for the first year of treatment and yearly thereafter (Nieschlag et al 2005). Age adjusted PSA reference ranges should be used to identify men who require further assessment. The concept of PSA velocity is also important and refers to the rate of increase in PSA per year. Patients with abnormal rectal examination suggestive of prostate cancer, PSA above the age specific reference range or a PSA velocity greater than 0.75 ng/ml/yr should be referred to a urologist for consideration of prostate biopsy.

Women also feel the effects of testosterone imbalance. Common knowledge holds that testosterone is just for men, but that’s not true. Low testosterone in women results in a wide variety of hard to diagnose symptoms: fatigue, anxiety, sleeplessness, depression, and weight gain are some common symptoms. These effects are commonly seen after menopause, but hormone imbalances can happen at any age. Properly balancing the body’s natural testosterone and estrogen levels prevents these symptoms.
I think that the biggest hurdle for most physicians prescribing testosterone is the fear that they’re going to promote prostate cancer. [See “Incongruous findings,” below.] That’s because more than six decades ago, it was shown that if you lowered testosterone in men whose prostate cancer had metastasized, their condition improved. (It became a standard therapy that we still use today for men with advanced prostate cancer. We call it androgen deprivation or androgen-suppressive therapy.) The thinking became that if lowering testosterone makes prostate cancer disappear, at least for a while, then raising it must make prostate cancer grow. But even though it’s been a widely held belief for six decades, no one has found any additional evidence to support the theory.
The diagnosis of late-onset hypogonadism requires the combination of low serum testosterone levels with symptoms of hypogonadism. Questionnaires are available which check for the symptoms of hypogonadism. These have been validated for the assessment of aging patients with hypogonadism (Morley et al 2000; Moore et al 2004) but have a low specificity. In view of the overlap in symptoms between hypogonadism, aging and other medical conditions it is wise to use a formal method of symptom assessment which can be used to monitor the effects of testosterone replacement.
The effects of testosterone in humans and other vertebrates occur by way of multiple mechanisms: by activation of the androgen receptor (directly or as DHT), and by conversion to estradiol and activation of certain estrogen receptors.[113][114] Androgens such as testosterone have also been found to bind to and activate membrane androgen receptors.[115][116][117]

According to studies by Srivastava [15] and Thomson et al. [21] ginger can be used as natural antithrombotic agent. Ginger has also been recorded as useful remedy in preventing post-operative nausea and vomiting in humans [13] as well as preventing morning sickness during pregnancy [16]. At high doses (500 mg/kg) aqueous extract of ginger exhibits cholesterol-lowering effect [21].
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BSN Evotest the next ranked testosterone booster and is a unique option in that it’s available in both capsule and powdered drink form. For those who dislike swallowing pills, this will be a better route to go. There are mixed reports on the taste quality of the product, however, this is an individual preference and should not be something that deters you from purchasing it. It mixes fairly well by most reports, so is something that you should be able to easily take with you to the gym for use during the workout session.
I know many of you are clamoring for the “how-to” part of this series (which will go up on Thursday), but before we get to that, it’s important to cover why you should even care about your testosterone levels in the first place, what T is and how it’s made, and how to get properly tested for it. Building a sound foundation before we dive into the nitty gritty details will be highly beneficial.
Low testosterone levels can cause mood disturbances, increased body fat, loss of muscle tone, inadequate erections and poor sexual performance, osteoporosis, difficulty with concentration, memory loss and sleep difficulties. Current research suggests that this effect occurs in only a minority (about 2%) of ageing men. However, there is a lot of research currently in progress to find out more about the effects of testosterone in older men and also whether the use of testosterone replacement therapy would have any benefits.
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