^ Jump up to: a b Lazaridis I, Charalampopoulos I, Alexaki VI, Avlonitis N, Pediaditakis I, Efstathopoulos P, Calogeropoulou T, Castanas E, Gravanis A (2011). "Neurosteroid dehydroepiandrosterone interacts with nerve growth factor (NGF) receptors, preventing neuronal apoptosis". PLoS Biol. 9 (4): e1001051. doi:10.1371/journal.pbio.1001051. PMC 3082517. PMID 21541365.
I’ve been on testosterone replacement for over 3 years and at first I did the shots and my mood swings were ridiculous, my skin broke out on my chest and shoulders, and my henatocrit went to 55%. I finally got fed up with doing shots every two weeks and switched to Gel and it’s been so much better. It actually increases my levels which is rare for most men. I do 12.5 mg, three pumps a day, and this keeps My level between 500 and 600. My hematocrit is 48.5 and no mood swings.
Based on my research, I guess fenugreek is kind of a crapshoot, a toss-up, a gamble, a coin toss, a roulette spin of sorts, you get the idea.  There are a lot of conflicting reports on whether it increases or decreases testosterone levels, but it seems like the libido-improvement is consistent.  The vast majority of men report positive effects from fenugreek so go ahead and give it a shot.
Alcohol has constantly been shown to lower testosterone levels. It’s even worse if you’re a heavy beer drinker. Wanna know why? Because beer raises your estrogen levels due to the phytoestrogens that are produced from the hops used to make beer. If that’s not enough, studies have shown that alcoholics have lower levels of testosterone than non-alcoholics.
Increased testosterone can have an impact on body composition. Possible benefits include gains in lean muscle mass, reduced body fat and increased bone density. Testosterone inhibits uptake of triglycerides and increases lipid mobilization from adipose tissue, and the increase or decrease of testosterone will usually have an inverse effect on fat stores, with higher testosterone generally causing a decrease in body fat. "The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism" published a study in 2007 that showed decreases in body fat and increases in lean mass in HIV-positive obese men given testosterone therapy. In 1989, a study of the effects of testosterone on muscle mass at the University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry suggests that increasing testosterone increases protein synthesis in muscles. Body composition changes from increased testosterone were also demonstrated in a 1999 study at the School of Exercise Science and Sports Management, Southern Cross University in Australia performed on male weight-training subjects, which showed increases in arm girth and body weight and decreased body fat following a 12-week cycle of testosterone enanthate.
My genetic make-up is 47XXY. I was diagnosed in September, 1976, and have been on some kind of T-therapy since – injections, pills, gels, patches, pellets, now back on injections. At this time, now, I inject 1/2cc deep IM, every 7-8 days. I suffered a blood clot between my knee and my groin (right leg) in January, 2017. I am now on Eliquis through June, 2017. My blood has always been quick to coagulate. I’ve read through all of this, and only found mention of blood clots sporadically in relation to T-therapy. I’m 70 yoa, have never had a problem before. Can you give me any info I can pass along to my doctor? Thank you.
Epidemiological evidence supports a link between testosterone and glucose metabolism. Studies in non-diabetic men have found an inverse correlation of total or free testosterone with glucose and insulin levels (Simon et al 1992; Haffner et al 1994) and studies show lower testosterone levels in patients with the metabolic syndrome (Laaksonen et al 2003; Muller et al 2005; Kupelian et al 2006) or diabetes (Barrett-Connor 1992; Andersson et al 1994; Rhoden et al 2005). A study of patients with type 2 diabetes using measurement of serum free testosterone by the gold standard method of equilibrium dialysis, found a 33% prevalence of biochemical hypogonadism (Dhindsa et al 2004). The Barnsley study demonstrated a high prevalence of clinical and biochemical hypogonadism with 19% having total testosterone levels below 8 nmol/l and a further 25% between 8–12 nmol/l (Kapoor, Aldred et al 2007). There are also a number longitudinal studies linking low serum testosterone levels to the future development of the metabolic syndrome (Laaksonen et al 2004) or type 2 diabetes (Haffner et al 1996; Tibblin et al 1996; Stellato et al 2000; Oh et al 2002; Laaksonen et al 2004), indicating a possible role of hypogonadism in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes in men. Alternatively, it has been postulated that obesity may be the common link between low testosterone levels and insulin resistance, diabetes and cardiovascular disease (Phillips et al 2003; Kapoor et al 2005). With regard to this hypothesis, study findings vary as to whether the association of testosterone with diabetes occurs independently of obesity (Haffner et al 1996; Laaksonen et al 2003; Rhoden et al 2005).
Testosterone boosters are a class of herbal supplements aimed at naturally increasing your testosterone levels. Usually, they contain micronutrients that men are commonly deficient in, such as zinc, and which have been connected in research to healthy testosterone levels. They also may contain adaptogens, which are a class of supplement that are thought to help the body adapt to stress, or ingredients which have been connected to improved sleep. Sleep restriction has been shown to reduce testosterone in healthy young men, and as Chris Lockwood, Ph.D., notes, disturbed sleep is a common symptom of low T-levels.[1]
I read several comments about blood clots. The issue was more than likely caused by estrogen overload and the measurement of ultra sensitive estradiol would prove it. I would wager that given T without anastrozole and having belly fat, that aromatase enzyme converted T to estrogen and that is why clots developed and why they felt worse instead of better. That is my opinion.
In accordance with sperm competition theory, testosterone levels are shown to increase as a response to previously neutral stimuli when conditioned to become sexual in male rats.[40] This reaction engages penile reflexes (such as erection and ejaculation) that aid in sperm competition when more than one male is present in mating encounters, allowing for more production of successful sperm and a higher chance of reproduction.
If you take a statin (cholesterol lowering medication) and you follow the 30-Day Heart Tune-Up program, there is a good chance you’ll be able to work with your doctor and over time safely stop your statin medication. Statin medications lower cholesterol, and you need cholesterol to make testosterone. Ask your doctor what you can do with lifestyle changes to not need a statin medication. Improving your cholesterol profile is only part of the answer. Many of the risk calculators doctors use look at tobacco use, body weight, blood pressure, blood sugar, and cholesterol. Improve all your risk factors, and often you won’t qualify for a medication!

I am 41, T was tested at 400 last month. I was Very active /hyper growing up. I have felt my strength and energy fade over the last 10 years to the point that i now take a nap in the afternoon. Sexual performance has been on a steep decline since 35 to the point of disfunction with out herbal pills or cialis. Also had 2 kids in last 5 years,(second marriage) , and at times have a hard time tolerating the stresses due to lack of energy to cope with the increased emotional load.


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In addition to that, one positive benefit that this product offers that not all natural testosterone boosters do is that it can help to improve your overall mood state. While maintaining a better mood is clearly a favorable thing, it also helps out in terms of your muscle building results because the better your mood is, the higher your motivation tends to be, which then means more effort put forth in the gym.
This paper will aim to review the current evidence of clinical effects of testosterone treatment within an aging male population. As with any other clinical intervention a decision to treat patients with testosterone requires a balance of risk versus benefit. We shall try to facilitate this by examining the effects of testosterone on the various symptoms and organs involved.
This is because your body is really good at self-regulating your hormone levels. So if you have normal testosterone levels, boosting above your natural base level may at best give you a few hours while your body makes, and then immediately processes out, the excess testosterone. This means you might experience higher than your average testosterone levels, but not by much, and only for a little while.
I’m a 70 year old male. Here’s my brief story, I was exhausted all the time after an encounter with H-Py-Lori. After may tests it was found out that my T-count was at about 250. I was put on a testosterone cream replacement therapy. Before I knew it, at about month I was at 1500 count. This was at 4 cream applications a day. The doctor took me down to twice/two applications a day, now I was at 600. I felt great at both levels.
In a placebo-controlled study, 27 Division II football players received either a placebo or a ZMA supplement for a total of seven weeks during their scheduled spring practice. At the end of the seven weeks, the players taking the ZMA supplement had a 30 percent increase in testosterone, while the placebo group had a 10 percent decrease. The ZMA group also saw an 11.6 percent increase in strength, compared to only 4.6 percent in the placebo group.[7]
The researchers found that men who received hormone treatment experienced an increase in bone strength and density. Strength increases were greater in the spine than they were in the hip. However, as with other T Trials, more research needs to be done. A larger study over many years would need to be performed to determine whether testosterone could decrease risk of bone fracture.
It seems like today it’s a badge of honor to train every day until exhaustion. The ethos is to push yourself harder and harder every day. If that’s your philosophy towards exercise, you might be sabotaging your testosterone levels (as well as your 20 Mile March). Studies have shown that overtraining can reduce testosterone levels significantly. Yes, it’s important to exercise hard, but it’s even more important to give your body rest so it can recuperate from the damage you inflicted upon it.
If you live in or near the Pittsburgh, PA area, are over 35 and want a free blood test and Physician Exam to see if you are eligible for prescription testosterone, Arimidex and a DHT blocker. Additionally, you may have adult onset gH deficiency. By middle age, most people lose up to 85% of their endogenous gH production. You may also be eligibility for sermorelin, a gH releasing hormone. contact us at ReGenesis HRT. 724-510-0024

Hello I’m 22 years old and for years I’ve been struggling with hypothyroidism and depression. Recently I went to check my blood for low T and was shocked but not surprised at the level (125). That’s terrible for a 22 year old given that’s the time my testosterone is supposed to be the highest. Anyways I’ve been prescribed depo testosterone 200ml bottle. I give myself a shot each week and haven’t really noticed much change. I know I have to give it time, but is there anything else I can do or should be prescribed to help speed up the process?
Also, for those with abnormal fatigue. It’s being found too often that hypogonadism is pared with another abnormality of the endocrine system called Hypothyroidism which causes intense fatigue and even alzheimer like cognitive disruption. Both the Testis and Thyroid need to receive signaling hormones from the Pituitary to function correctly and the Pituitary relies heavily on the Hypothalamus. Simple blood tests can check all of those. It is important you find out the reason you have low Testosterone!
Let’s first start off by saying, there is no comparison of natural testosterone boosters to synthetic.  When referring to synthetic, we’re talking anabolic steroids.  At that point, you’re comparing apples and oranges.  Which is best—natural or synthetic?  Synthetic.  It is much easier to put on quality muscle mass while using anabolics than it is using a natural testosterone booster.  One is basically giving you synthetic testosterone while the other is giving you a minor boost in natural testosterone production.  However, not only are there side effects to the use of anabolics, but they are also illegal in the United States unless used under a doctor’s supervision with a prescription.
Men who produce more testosterone are more likely to engage in extramarital sex.[55] Testosterone levels do not rely on physical presence of a partner; testosterone levels of men engaging in same-city and long-distance relationships are similar.[54] Physical presence may be required for women who are in relationships for the testosterone–partner interaction, where same-city partnered women have lower testosterone levels than long-distance partnered women.[59]
A notable study out of Wayne State University in Indiana found that older men who had a mild zinc deficiency significantly increased their testosterone from 8.3 to 16.0 nmol/L—a 93 percent increase—following six months of zinc supplementation. Researchers of the study concluded that zinc may play an important role in modulating serum testosterone levels in normal healthy men.6
Some of the effects of testosterone treatment are well recognised and it seems clear that testosterone treatment for aging hypogonadal men can be expected to increase lean body mass, decrease visceral fat mass, increase bone mineral density and decrease total cholesterol. Beneficial effects have been seen in many trials on other parameters such as glycemic control in diabetes, erectile dysfunction, cardiovascular risk factors, angina, mood and cognition. These potentially important effects require confirmation in larger clinical trials. Indeed, it is apparent that longer duration randomized controlled trials of testosterone treatment in large numbers of men are needed to confirm the effects of testosterone on many aspects of aging male health including cardiovascular health, psychiatric health, prostate cancer and functional capacity. In the absence of such studies, it is necessary to balance risk and benefit on the best available data. At the present time the data supports the treatment of hypogonadal men with testosterone to normalize testosterone levels and improve symptoms. Most men with hypogonadism do not have a contraindication to treatment, but it is important to monitor for adverse consequences including prostate complications and polycythemia.
Alphamax XT’s testosterone boosting formula is so potent that they had to include an estrogen blocker in the formula. User’s have reported that the product’s effects rivals a hardcore pre-workout in terms of aggression and intensity. When the workout is done user’s have also been reporting accelerated muscle recovery, fat loss, and increased muscle definition.
Margaret, I’m on Trt, and my wife is 43 going through Peri- (early/pre) menopause. She started trying about a drop a day to see if her libido would improve, and it did, dramatically, and also her moods and patience. After about a month of feeling 30again, she started noticing lite facial hair developing, decreased breast size, and return of all previous symptoms. So she went off it. About a month later, she started St.JohnsWart, and everything improved tenfold. Now she feels 20 instead of just 30 on testosterone. She literally glows with smiles and energy, and has an extremely high libido. Maybe try that first. Good luck.
Findings that improvements in serum glucose, serum insulin, insulin resistance or glycemic control, in men treated with testosterone are accompanied by reduced measures of central obesity, are in line with other studies showing a specific effect of testosterone in reducing central or visceral obesity (Rebuffe-Scrive et al 1991; Marin, Holmang et al 1992). Furthermore, studies that have shown neutral effects of testosterone on glucose metabolism have not measured (Corrales et al 2004), or shown neutral effects (Lee et al 2005) (Tripathy et al 1998; Bhasin et al 2005) on central obesity. Given the known association of visceral obesity with insulin resistance, it is possible that testosterone treatment of hypogonadal men acts to improve insulin resistance and diabetes through an effect in reducing central obesity. This effect can be explained by the action of testosterone in inhibiting lipoprotein lipase and thereby reducing triglyceride uptake into adipocytes (Sorva et al 1988), an action which seems to occur preferentially in visceral fat (Marin et al 1995; Marin et al 1996). Visceral fat is thought to be more responsive to hormonal changes due to a greater concentration of androgen receptors and increased vascularity compared with subcutaneous fat (Bjorntorp 1996). Further explanation of the links between hypogonadism and obesity is offered by the hypogonadal-obesity-adipocytokine cycle hypothesis (see Figure 1). In this model, increases in body fat lead to increases in aromatase levels, in addition to insulin resistance, adverse lipid profiles and increased leptin levels. Increased action of aromatase in metabolizing testosterone to estrogen, reduces testosterone levels which induces further accumulation of visceral fat. Higher leptin levels and possibly other factors, act at the pituitary to suppress gonadotrophin release and exacerbate hypogonadism (Cohen 1999; Kapoor et al 2005). Leptin has also been shown to reduce testosterone secretion from rodent testes in vitro (Tena-Sempere et al 1999). A full review of the relationship between testosterone, insulin resistance and diabetes can be found elsewhere (Kapoor et al 2005; Jones 2007).
Present in much greater levels in men than women, testosterone initiates the development of the male internal and external reproductive organs during foetal development and is essential for the production of sperm in adult life. This hormone also signals the body to make new blood cells, ensures that muscles and bones stay strong during and after puberty and enhances libido both in men and women. Testosterone is linked to many of the changes seen in boys during puberty (including an increase in height, body and pubic hair growth, enlargement of the penis, testes and prostate gland, and changes in sexual and aggressive behaviour). It also regulates the secretion of luteinising hormone and follicle stimulating hormone. To effect these changes, testosterone is often converted into another androgen called dihydrotestosterone. 
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