Autopsy studies have found histological prostate cancer to be very common, with one series showing a prevalence of greater than fifty percent in men over age sixty (Holund 1980). The majority of histological cancers go undetected so that the clinical incidence of the disease is much lower, but it is still the most prevalent non-skin cancer in men (Jemal et al 2003). Prostate cancer is also unusual in comparison to other adult cancers in that the majority of those with the disease will die of other causes. Treatment of prostate cancer with androgen deprivation is known to be successful and is widely practiced, indicating an important role for testosterone in modifying the behavior of prostate cancer. In view of this, testosterone treatment is absolutely contraindicated in any case of known or suspected prostate cancer. The question of whether testosterone treatment could cause new cases of prostate cancer, or more likely cause progression of undiagnosed histological prostate cancer that would otherwise have remained occult, is an important consideration when treating ageing males with testosterone.
That said, magnesium is one of a few ingredients demonstrated to impact testosterone levels. Researchers at Italy’s University of Palermo found that magnesium improved participants’ anabolic hormone status — including their testosterone levels. In a follow-up study, they confirm that even adjusting for age differences in their participant group, “magnesium was positively associated with total testosterone.” They propose that magnesium supplementation might help improve muscle performance in aging men — a group particularly vulnerable to declining/low testosterone levels. Outside of Italy, researchers at Turkey’s Selçuk University found that magnesium supplementation increased testosterone levels for both athletes and more sedentary men alike.

A testosterone booster is a natural supplement used by people (mostly men) to boost their testosterone levels. They work in a few different ways. First, they often impact the hormones related to testosterone and cause more of the hormones to circulate in the blood. They also can block estrogen production, which is commonly called a female sex hormone.
Oral ginger was reported to accelerate gastric emptying and stimulate gastric motility (spontaneous movements of the stomach that aid in digestion). Most studies report some beneficial effect on gastric emptying time but mostly during some sort of disease state [10,11]. In healthy individuals ginger also seems to increase gastric emptying via antral contraction stimulation [12]. However, Phillips and colleagues [13] reported that ginger is not associated with an effect on gastric emptying. In animals, ginger and its active constituent [6]-Gingerol were reported to enhance gastrointestinal tract transit [14].

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