Research shows that bone density increases with testosterone treatment as long as the dose is high enough. on the effect of testosterone on bone density found increases in spinal and hip bone density. Another of females transitioning into males found that testosterone increased bone mineral density. But it’s unknown if testosterone can help with reducing fracture risk.
Estrogen is important in men, but too high of a level has all sorts of negative consequences – ranging from heart attacks to prostate cancer (32 & 33). The balance between testosterone and estrogen (or estradiol) is critical for a man. If the ratio is out and estrogen starts to dominate you run into all sorts of issues – such as breast cell growth, prostate enlargement and of course lower testosterone.

BCAA peptides are the building blocks of muscle.  Your body cannot make BCAA’s.  You have to eat them.  One easy way of course is food and things like whey protein powder.  That is why whey protein works so well because it contains BCAA’s at high levels.  Advanced BCAA is 50% BCAA in peptide form!!  Peptides are digested faster and more efficiently than whole foods and normal protein powders.  This means more muscle building and recovery support!!


Zinc: Another potent ingredient to add to any testosterone booster is zinc. This study shows how zinc is able to prevent a decline in testosterone levels during intense and hard workouts performed by wrestlers. Researchers found that the group who was administered with a placebo had a reduction in testosterone, as opposed to the group who were supplemented with zinc. The placebo group had a notable drop in their testosterone count during this process. Zinc has also been shown to increase the number of free testosterone and lower SHBG.

Our bodies make testosterone while we sleep. In one study, men who got five hours of sleep a night had testosterone levels 10 to 15 percent lower than when they got a solid eight hours. The study, conducted by the University of Chicago, found that skimping on sleep reduced the men’s T levels by an amount equivalent to aging 10 or more years. While it can be challenging to change your sleep habits, says Natasha Turner, ND, you can “start going to bed 15 minutes earlier each week until you reach your target time.”
Now, many men bypass the natty test booster category altogether, head straight for designer anabolic steroids, and start injecting testosterone (among other things). And, while exogenous testosterone administration will always trump the effects of natural testosterone boosters, that instant gratification does not come without a long, dreadful list of unwanted consequences.
In this podcast, I will review the key biomarkers for achieving peak male health, along with the most potent and effective practices for optimizing biological variables for men's fertility and longevity. I will also unveil a host of little-known biohacks proven to enhance or restore peak testosterone and drive, along with how to practically implement a blend of ancestral wisdom and modern science to amplify sexual performance.
Treatment is not necessary if your levels fall within the normal range. Testosterone replacement therapy is primarily beneficial for men with low testosterone levels. Don’t purchase testosterone without a prescription. See your doctor if you think you might have low levels of testosterone. A blood test can determine your testosterone levels and help diagnose underlying conditions.
More recently, a study from 2015 noted that consuming 600mg daily of standardized fenugreek extract for eight weeks increased free testosterone levels compared to placebo. The test group also experience an increase the the number of repetitions the could perform in the leg press before reaching failure. And, to top it off, subjects receiving the fenugreek supplement dropped body fat without losing strength.
I was age 55 with T level at150 so the va doctor started me out on bi weekly 200mg injections.Needless to say it really made me fell young again. My depression seemed to get better my sex life returned had lots of energy lost weight ect.Well i moved to upstate NY and the new doctor said that she was going to discontinue my treatments due to it being addictive drugs?I was in a va 6month rehab treatment for alcohol and opiate addictions.I went down hill very fast with my depression and my ability to focus & concentrate in my daliy functions.I went allmost a yr. before my new doctor found my levels being low and started me back on the injections 200 mg biweekly at the hospital va clinic but due to my addictions wont send me the needles for home use as before.So they gave me andro gel 1 pump daily but after my last visit she doubled the dose to 2 pumps daily and i am starting to feel and look better!I work out 5 days a week very hard in the weight room and have gained some great results in strength and muscle mass.She is going to check my blood work again in 2 months to see if it needs to increase my dose again.Any ways thanks for the best information i have seen so far o this subject.Also the TRT has given me my life back and i am so glad that this was here to help me as i grow old!
61y/o with 18month progressive lethargy, depressed mood, no sex drive, no erections. Doc put me on cymbalta (slept even more than 14hrs daily) then on Wellbutrin. All the time I was pushing for T testing. Came back low in March of this year and put on IM cypionate 100mg q3 weeks. Even I knew that was too low and infrequent. Nonetheless, that how it’s been since April. Finally got urology consult in Shreveport and got a level done at that time. Was 127 just two weeks after last injection. He is going to bump me up to 300mg q2 weeks and do a level 2 days after first injection and 1 day before next shot. Since I’m getting care thru VA, it’s a waiting game. Saw urologist last week. Prob won’t see testostosterone in mail for another week or two. I’m excited to feel like living again, not sleeping all the time, and perhaps some nooky now and then . Appreciated this article arm subsequent posts and personal trials. Would love to find a competent and assertive urologist in my area of Louisiana. I’m around Monroe….so if you know one, let me know!

Results from the clinical trial demonstrated that there were significant increases in hemoglobin in both men with unexplained anemia as well as men with anemia from known causes who used the testosterone gel. These results may be of clinical value, and testosterone treatment could be used to boost hemoglobin levels in men more than 65 who have unexplained anemia and low testosterone. However, more research needs to be done.


The study population in these TTrials included men aged 65 years or older with mean morning serum testosterone concentrations of 275 ng/dL or less and symptoms of impaired sexual function, physical function, or vitality. These trials were placebo-controlled and the testosterone treatment group received 1% testosterone gel at variable doses adjusted to maintain plasma testosterone at levels normal for young men (500-800 ng/dL).
A number of epidemiological studies have found that bone mineral density in the aging male population is positively associated with endogenous androgen levels (Murphy et al 1993; Ongphiphadhanakul et al 1995; Rucker et al 2004). Testosterone levels in young men have been shown to correlate with bone size, indicating a role in determination of peak bone mass and protection from future osteoporosis (Lorentzon et al 2005). Male hypogonadism has been shown to be a risk factor for hip fracture (Jackson et al 1992) and a recent study showed a high prevalence of hypogonadism in a group of male patients with average age 75 years presenting with minimal trauma fractures compared to stroke victims who acted as controls (Leifke et al 2005). Estrogen is a well known determinant of bone density in women and some investigators have found serum estrogen to be a strong determinant of male bone density (Khosla et al 1998; Khosla et al 2001). Serum estrogen was also found to correlate better than testosterone with peak bone mass (Khosla et al 2001) but this is in contradiction of a more recent study showing a negative correlation of estrogen with peak bone size (Lorentzon et al 2005). Men with aromatase deficiency (Carani et al 1997) or defunctioning estrogen receptor mutations (Smith et al 1994) have been found to have abnormally low bone density despite normal or high testosterone levels which further emphasizes the important influence of estrogen on male bone density.
My favorite overall tool to manage stress is EFT (Emotional Freedom Technique), which is like acupuncture without the needles. It's a handy, free tool for unloading emotional baggage quickly and painlessly, and so easy that even children can learn it. Other common stress-reduction tools with a high success rate include prayer, meditation, laughter and yoga, for example. Learning relaxation skills, such as deep breathing and positive visualization, which is the "language" of the subconscious.

A: A troche is a small lozenge designed to dissolve in the mouth. Testosterone is available in troche or buccal form. If you are referring to testosterone troche, this product is generally used to treat conditions in men that result from a lack of natural testosterone. Testosterone is vital to maintaining an active and healthy male sex drive. Testosterone deficiency can cause erectile dysfunction. Studies suggest that if erectile dysfunction is associated with a low testosterone level, it can often be treated with prescription testosterone pills. Based on your complete medical history and blood levels of testosterone, your doctor can determine the best treatment option to meet your needs. For more information, please consult with your health care provider and visit //www.everydayhealth.com/drugs/testosterone. Michelle McDermott, PharmD

Overall, it seems that both estrogen and testosterone are important for normal bone growth and maintenance. Deficiency or failure of action of the sex hormones is associated with osteoporosis and minimal trauma fractures. Estrogen in males is produced via metabolism of testosterone by aromatase and it is therefore important that androgens used for the treatment of hypogonadism be amenable to the action of aromatase to yield maximal positive effects on bone. There is data showing that testosterone treatment increases bone mineral density in aging males but that these benefits are confined to hypogonadal men. The magnitude of this improvement is greater in the spine than in the hip and further studies are warranted to confirm or refute any differential effects of testosterone at these important sites. Improvements seen in randomized controlled trials to date may underestimate true positive effects due to relatively short duration and/or baseline characteristics of the patients involved. There is no data as yet to confirm that the improvement in bone density with testosterone treatment reduces fractures in men and this is an important area for future study.
Rest and recovery is just as important as exercise, if not more so. Every time you do an intense workout, give yourself a minimum of 2 days to recuperate afterward, if not more. And don’t mix exercise with sleep hacking. If you’re exercising, get at least 8 hours of sleep every night. Your body uses it to rebuild, and you can throw your hormones out of whack if you don’t rest up properly. Here’s a more in-depth guide to Bulletproof weight training, complete with sample workouts.
I’ll be 31 this year and my belly is getting out of hand. I’ve cut way way back on my soda intake to maybe one or two a day most days and I’m drinking way more water than ever. Seems this belly is here to stay lol. I’m working on a better diet and I’m also gonna start back working out. This belly is a serious drag I hate it and I need it gone asap. What’s gonna be my best option in a test booster. I don’t want t to get all crazy buying fat burning pills and other foolery but I thing a test booster will help me all around. I’m high anxiety low energy poor sleeping over eating father of 4 and im currently in barber school. I need to make changes for my family and myself as well as my profession. Please help. (Belly is my only problem area I’m 30yrs olf 6ft 180lbs)
^ Butenandt A, Hanisch G (1935). "Umwandlung des Dehydroandrosterons in Androstendiol und Testosterone; ein Weg zur Darstellung des Testosterons aus Cholestrin" [About Testosterone. Conversion of Dehydro-androsterons into androstendiol and testosterone; a way for the structure assignment of testosterone from cholesterol]. Hoppe-Seyler's Z Physiol Chem (in German). 237 (2): 89–97. doi:10.1515/bchm2.1935.237.1-3.89.
Bushey, Brandon; Taylor, Lem W.; Wilborn, Colin W.; Poole, Chris; Foster, Cliffa A.; Campbell, Bill; Kreider, Richard B. and Willoughby, Darryn S. (2009). “Fenugreek Extract Supplementation Has No effect on the Hormonal Profile of Resitance-Trained Males” International Journal of Exercise Science: Conference Abstract Submissions: Vol. 2: Iss. 1, Article 13.
My biggest symptom was fatigue. Interestingly, I had and have no problem with erections at all. Granted, I wasn’t getting spontaneous erections like when I was a teenager and into my late 20’s, but that was a good thing as getting an erection whenever and having no way to relieve it can get annoying. Anyway, my biggest concern with low T was/is energy levels and loss of muscle mass.
In addition to conjugation and the 17-ketosteroid pathway, testosterone can also be hydroxylated and oxidized in the liver by cytochrome P450 enzymes, including CYP3A4, CYP3A5, CYP2C9, CYP2C19, and CYP2D6.[159] 6β-Hydroxylation and to a lesser extent 16β-hydroxylation are the major transformations.[159] The 6β-hydroxylation of testosterone is catalyzed mainly by CYP3A4 and to a lesser extent CYP3A5 and is responsible for 75 to 80% of cytochrome P450-mediated testosterone metabolism.[159] In addition to 6β- and 16β-hydroxytestosterone, 1β-, 2α/β-, 11β-, and 15β-hydroxytestosterone are also formed as minor metabolites.[159][160] Certain cytochrome P450 enzymes such as CYP2C9 and CYP2C19 can also oxidize testosterone at the C17 position to form androstenedione.[159]
At the present time, it is suggested that androgen replacement should take the form of natural testosterone. Some of the effects of testosterone are mediated after conversion to estrogen or dihydrotestosterone by the enzymes aromatase and 5a-reductase enzymes respectively. Other effects occur independently of the traditional action of testosterone via the classical androgen receptor- for example, its action as a vasodilator via a cell membrane action as described previously. It is therefore important that the androgen used to treat hypogonadism is amenable to the action of these metabolizing enzymes and can also mediate the non-androgen receptor actions of testosterone. Use of natural testosterone ensures this and reduces the chance of non-testosterone mediated adverse effects. There are now a number of testosterone preparations which can meet these recommendations and the main factor in deciding between them is patient choice.
The brain is also affected by this sexual differentiation;[13] the enzyme aromatase converts testosterone into estradiol that is responsible for masculinization of the brain in male mice. In humans, masculinization of the fetal brain appears, by observation of gender preference in patients with congenital diseases of androgen formation or androgen receptor function, to be associated with functional androgen receptors.[99]
Both testosterone and 5α-DHT are metabolized mainly in the liver.[1][155] Approximately 50% of testosterone is metabolized via conjugation into testosterone glucuronide and to a lesser extent testosterone sulfate by glucuronosyltransferases and sulfotransferases, respectively.[1] An additional 40% of testosterone is metabolized in equal proportions into the 17-ketosteroids androsterone and etiocholanolone via the combined actions of 5α- and 5β-reductases, 3α-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase, and 17β-HSD, in that order.[1][155][156] Androsterone and etiocholanolone are then glucuronidated and to a lesser extent sulfated similarly to testosterone.[1][155] The conjugates of testosterone and its hepatic metabolites are released from the liver into circulation and excreted in the urine and bile.[1][155][156] Only a small fraction (2%) of testosterone is excreted unchanged in the urine.[155]

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In a recent study of male workers, men with low testosterone levels had an increased chance of severe erectile dysfunction (Kratzik et al 2005), although such a link had not been found previously (Rhoden et al 2002). Certainly erectile dysfunction is considered part of the clinical syndrome of hypogonadism, and questions regarding erectile dysfunction form part of the clinical assessment of patients with hypogonadism (Morley et al 2000; Moore et al 2004).


Keep more weapons in your arsenal: Occasionally use lifting methods like forced reps, negatives, and dropsets to further stress your body. Personal trainer and fitness journalist Michael Berg explains in "6 Ways to Crank Up Your Testosterone Levels" that going beyond muscular failure with these techniques has been shown to pump up T-levels in study subjects.[16]
When I was on 4 pumps per day, I had a reduction of ejaculate, and sometimes found it hard to ejaculate. Getting erections is no problem, and I even take BP meds. I vary it now. When I’m not going to the gym, or traveling, I cut down to 2 pumps, or take a break for a few days. When I’m intense in the gym, I stick with 4 pumps (about 5mg). I do still have the belly flab unfortunately. I need to increase cardio, and change up the diet some, but honestly, I am not too bad with my diet, so I’m a little frustrated.

Hypogonadism is highly prevalent amongst men with diabetes mellitus type 2 or symptoms of the metabolic syndrome, including insulin resistance, impaired glucose regulation, obesity, and hypertension.1,6,13,14,17,18 Low testosterone in many men with diabetes remains undiagnosed and untreated, and current guidelines recommend measurement of testosterone levels in such patients and, equally, that such chronic diseases should be investigated and treated in men with hypogonadism.1,6 It is not yet fully known whether diabetes is a cause or a consequence of low testosterone, and the full effects of testosterone administration on glycemic control in hypogonadal men with diabetes are unclear. However, there are indications that treating hypogonadism may have benefits on metabolic status in men with diabetes, and there is evidence that testosterone replacement therapy has a beneficial effect on risk factors for diabetes such as central obesity, insulin sensitivity, glucose control and blood lipid profiles in hypogonadal men with type 2 diabetes.14,19,20

   The International Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance recently studied tennis players, rugby teams, and wrestlers to find a link between testosterone and competitive outcome. They found that the difference between winning and losing was reflected in testosterone levels! The athletes' own natural testosterone prior to the game was directly related to the outcome after the game -- the higher the testosterone, the more frequently the athlete won.6


Thus, alcohol metabolism destroys the essential coenzyme required for T synthesis. Alcohol also contributes to the release of special endorphins which inhibit hormone production. In addition, drinking too much alcohol leads to the elevation of estrogen levels in men because of the conversion of testosterone in estrogen. It means that T levels come down with a run.

I can report that I saw decreased body fat during my three-month testosterone experiment. I started off with 18% body fat and ended the experiment with 12% body fat. I almost have a six-pack! This is the leanest I’ve ever been in my entire life. The funny thing is, I wasn’t even trying to shed body fat. It just happened. All hail, mighty testosterone!
Workouts lasting longer than about an hour may begin to spike cortisol levels and subsequently decrease testosterone. Additionally, research has demonstrated that a shorter rest period between sets (1 minute versus 3 minutes) elicited higher acute hormonal responses following a bout of resistance training.11 To maximize your testosterone response, keep your rest periods short and total workout time to 60 minutes or fewer.
Cross-sectional studies have not shown raised testosterone levels at the time of diagnosis of prostate cancer, and in fact, low testosterone at the time of diagnosis has been linked with more locally aggressive and malignant tumors (Massengill et al 2003; Imamoto et al 2005; Isom-Batz et al 2005). This may reflect loss of hormone related control of the tumor or the effect of a more aggressive tumor in decreasing testosterone levels. One study found that 14% of hypogonadal men, with normal digital rectal examination and PSA levels, had histological prostate cancer on biopsy. It is possible that low androgen levels masked the usual evidence of prostate cancer in this population (Morgentaler et al 1996). Most longitudinal studies have not shown a correlation between testosterone levels and the future development of prostate cancer (Carter et al 1995; Heikkila et al 1999; Stattin et al 2004) but a recent study did find a positive association (Parsons et al 2005). Interpretation of such data requires care, as the presentation of prostate cancer could be altered or delayed in patients with lower testosterone levels.
AC, I just ran across the thread… definitely start the injections. Should help with levels that low. I’m 36 and have battled low T for 6-7 years. My labs came back to show 90ng/dl when I just turned 30, and I’ve done Testosterone cypionate injections @ 100mg/mL weekly, Testim, Androgel, and Fortesta over the years. I’m actually going to my endocrinologist tomorrow to have new blood work done.

Testosterone may increase competitiveness. Men are known to be a competitive bunch and testosterone is likely responsible for our drive to win. Testosterone is linked with a man’s desire for power and status (Dabbs & Dabbs 2000). Testosterone ramps up before a fight or competition – producing effects on muscle mass and hemoglobin, quickening reactions, improving visual acuity, and increasing your feelings of endurance and indomitability. It also increases your “gameness:” One study showed that a man’s testosterone level after losing a game predicted whether or not he got back in for another round. Men who experienced a severe drop were less likely to play again, while men who experienced little or no drop in T levels got back into the game. Researchers concluded from this observation that T is one of the factors driving competitiveness in men.


Let’s first start off by saying, there is no comparison of natural testosterone boosters to synthetic.  When referring to synthetic, we’re talking anabolic steroids.  At that point, you’re comparing apples and oranges.  Which is best—natural or synthetic?  Synthetic.  It is much easier to put on quality muscle mass while using anabolics than it is using a natural testosterone booster.  One is basically giving you synthetic testosterone while the other is giving you a minor boost in natural testosterone production.  However, not only are there side effects to the use of anabolics, but they are also illegal in the United States unless used under a doctor’s supervision with a prescription.
I have been on testosterone injections for about six months now. My urologist has me taking 50mg a week. I noticed that when I take the injection my normal resting heart rate is about 61 beats a minute, on the day of the injection it goes up to about 84 BPM. I also notice a tightness in my chest/esophagus area for about 24-48 hours and than it subsides. I have also noticed it appears to make my eyes water on the day of the injection. I have gotten off the injections because that is the obvious thing to do, but the dillema is than my personal life with the wife suffers. I am in great shape and work out all the time. Is there anything you can recommended I do to mitigate the increased blood pressure and increased heart beat? My last blood test showed normal except my estrogen was right at the recommended max but still with in limits. Any advice would be appreciated.
The IOM report estimated that a study of whether there is an increased risk of prostate cancer in men on testosterone therapy might require following 5,000 men for three to five years. Before launching such an endeavor, the report recommended more firmly establishing the effectiveness of testosterone-replacement therapy, saying that studies of long-term risks and benefits should be conducted only after short-term efficacy has been proven. That means the male equivalent of the WHI remains far off.
As a urologist, I tend to see men because they have sexual complaints. The primary hallmark of low testosterone is low sexual desire or libido, but another can be erectile dysfunction, and any man who complains of erectile dysfunction should get his testosterone level checked. Men may experience other symptoms, such as more difficulty achieving an orgasm, less-intense orgasms, a smaller amount of fluid from ejaculation, and a feeling of numbness in the penis when they see or experience something that would normally be arousing.

The changes in average serum testosterone levels with aging mean that the proportion of men fulfilling a biochemically defined diagnosis of hypogonadism increases with aging. Twenty percent of men aged over 60 have total testosterone levels below the normal range and the figure rises to 50% in those aged over 80. The figures concerning free testosterone are even higher as would be expected in view of the concurrent decrease in SHBG levels (Harman et al 2001).
A large number of trials have demonstrated a positive effect of testosterone treatment on bone mineral density (Katznelson et al 1996; Behre et al 1997; Leifke et al 1998; Snyder et al 2000; Zacharin et al 2003; Wang, Cunningham et al 2004; Aminorroaya et al 2005; Benito et al 2005) and bone architecture (Benito et al 2005). These effects are often more impressive in longer trials, which have shown that adequate replacement will lead to near normal bone density but that the full effects may take two years or more (Snyder et al 2000; Wang, Cunningham et al 2004; Aminorroaya et al 2005). Three randomized placebo-controlled trials of testosterone treatment in aging males have been conducted (Snyder et al 1999; Kenny et al 2001; Amory et al 2004). One of these studies concerned men with a mean age of 71 years with two serum testosterone levels less than 12.1nmol/l. After 36 months of intramuscular testosterone treatment or placebo, there were significant increases in vertebral and hip bone mineral density. In this study, there was also a significant decrease in the bone resorption marker urinary deoxypyridinoline with testosterone treatment (Amory et al 2004). The second study contained men with low bioavailable testosterone levels and an average age of 76 years. Testosterone treatment in the form of transdermal patches was given for 1 year. During this trial there was a significant preservation of hip bone mineral density with testosterone treatment but testosterone had no effect on bone mineral density at other sites including the vertebrae. There were no significant alterations in bone turnover markers during testosterone treatment (Kenny et al 2001). The remaining study contained men of average age 73 years. Men were eligible for the study if their serum total testosterone levels were less than 16.5 nmol/L, meaning that the study contained men who would usually be considered eugonadal. The beneficial effects of testosterone on bone density were confined to the men who had lower serum testosterone levels at baseline and were seen only in the vertebrae. There were no significant changes in bone turnover markers. Testosterone in the trial was given via scrotal patches for a 36 month duration (Snyder et al 1999). A recent meta-analysis of the effects on bone density of testosterone treatment in men included data from these studies and two other randomized controlled trials. The findings were that testosterone produces a significant increase of 2.7% in the bone mineral density at the lumber spine but no overall change at the hip (Isidori et al 2005). These results from randomized controlled trials in aging men show much smaller benefits of testosterone treatment on bone density than have been seen in other trials. This could be due to the trials including patients who are not hypogonadal and being too short to allow for the maximal effects of testosterone. The meta-analysis also assessed the data concerning changes of bone formation and resorption markers during testosterone treatment. There was a significant decrease in bone resorption markers but no change in markers of bone formation suggesting that reduction of bone resorption may be the primary mode of action of testosterone in improving bone density (Isidori et al 2005).
Men on long-term testosterone appear to have a higher risk of cardiovascular problems, like heart attacks, strokes, and deaths from heart disease. For example, in 2010, researchers halted the Testosterone in Older Men study when early results showed that men on hormone treatments had noticeably more heart problems. "In older men, theoretical cardiac side effects become a little more immediate," Dr. Pallais says.
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