Zaima, N., Kinoshita, S., Hieda, N., Kugo, H., Narisawa, K., Yamamoto, A., ... Moriyama, T. (2016, September). Effect of dietary fish oil on mouse testosterone level and the distribution of eicosapentaenoic acid-containing phosphatidylcholine in testicular interstitium. Biochemistry and Biophysics Reports, 7, 259–265. Retrieved from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5613343/
Before a boy is even born, testosterone is working to form male genitals. During puberty, testosterone is responsible for the development of male attributes like a deeper voice, beard, and body hair. It also promotes muscle mass and sex drive. Testosterone production surges during adolescence and peaks in the late teens or early 20s. After age 30, it’s natural for testosterone levels to drop by about one percent each year.
It has also been found that college graduates with higher levels of T (men and women alike) are more likely to go into riskier careers. Another study discovered that among financial traders, a trader’s morning level of testosterone accurately predicted his day’s profitability – higher levels of T mean he’s more likely to take risks that day and score big.
Testosterone is only one of many factors that influence aggression and the effects of previous experience and environmental stimuli have been found to correlate more strongly. A few studies indicate that the testosterone derivative estradiol (one form of estrogen) might play an important role in male aggression.[66][71][72][73] Studies have also found that testosterone facilitates aggression by modulating vasopressin receptors in the hypothalamus.[74]
The steroid hormone known as dehydroepiandrosterone, DHEA, plays an important role in sexual behavior, mental health and muscle growth. Your body uses this hormone to make sex steroids. Thus, taking a DHEA supplement should increase your circulating testosterone. A 2018 paper in the International Journal of Sports Medicine explored this possibility in athletic women.

Testosterone may strengthen your heart. Research on testosterone’s relation to heart health is split. Some scientists have found that men with higher testosterone levels have an increased risk of heart disease, while recent studies have shown that men with below-normal T levels are more at risk for heart problems. The research is still on-going, but many doctors find the evidence compelling that optimal testosterone levels can help prevent cardiovascular disease.
Are you getting enough vitamin D? Vitamin D is an essential nutrient, but it can be difficult for people to know if they are getting the right amount. Some people will be able to get enough vitamin D from sunlight. Others may need to make dietary changes or take supplements. Here, we explain how to get vitamin D from sunlight, food, and supplements. Read now
In non-human primates, it may be that testosterone in puberty stimulates sexual arousal, which allows the primate to increasingly seek out sexual experiences with females and thus creates a sexual preference for females.[39] Some research has also indicated that if testosterone is eliminated in an adult male human or other adult male primate's system, its sexual motivation decreases, but there is no corresponding decrease in ability to engage in sexual activity (mounting, ejaculating, etc.).[39]

It's important to understand that your body requires saturated fats from animal and vegetable sources (such as meat, dairy, certain oils, and tropical plants like coconut) for optimal functioning, and if you neglect this important food group in favor of sugar, grains and other starchy carbs, your health and weight are almost guaranteed to suffer. Examples of healthy fats you can eat more of to give your testosterone levels a boost include:


Vitamin D3 has the ability to naturally boost testosterone levels.  Increasing serum vitamin D levels in the body can help increase testosterone production, allowing you to potentially build muscle at a faster rate. If you don’t live in an area of the world that allows for a good amount of sunlight, you could become deficient and could benefit from a vitamin D supplement.
Every ingredient can be harmful when taken in significant quantities (we go more into that below), so we pored over each booster’s ingredient list to make sure that they weren’t serving up an overdose. In particular, we took a close look at magnesium and zinc, which have enough scientific background behind them to offer hard upper limits on how much you can safely consume.
Tribulus terrestris is an ingredient commonly presented as improving testosterone levels, but has not been found to be more effective than a placebo or possess any testosterone increasing properties. WebMD cautions that it interferes with Lithium and diabetes medications, and in general, not enough is known about tribulus terrestris to recommend a dosage for anyone.
For example, testosterone can increase the hematocrit, the percentage of red blood cells in the bloodstream. If the hematocrit goes up too high, we worry about the blood becoming too viscous or thick, possibly predisposing someone to stroke or clotting events. Although, frankly, in a review that I wrote in the New England Journal of Medicine* where we reviewed as much of this as we could, we found no cases of stroke or severe clotting related to testosterone therapy. Nevertheless, the risk exists, so we want to be careful about giving testosterone to men who already have a high hematocrit, such as those with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, or those who have a red-blood-cell disorder.
Avoid stressful situations – It is actually that simple. If you can avoid stressful situations, then you can significantly improve your overall testosterone production. Why is that? Well, you should know that stress makes our bodies to produce cortisol that is a notorious and well-known testosterone killer. So, what can you do about it? Well, you should definitely try deep breathing, meditating, exercising, and other lifestyle changes that can help you deal with the stressful situations the right way.
The regulation of testosterone production is tightly controlled to maintain normal levels in blood, although levels are usually highest in the morning and fall after that. The hypothalamus and the pituitary gland are important in controlling the amount of testosterone produced by the testes. In response to gonadotrophin-releasing hormone from the hypothalamus, the pituitary gland produces luteinising hormone which travels in the bloodstream to the gonads and stimulates the production and release of testosterone.

The mechanism of age related decreases in serum testosterone levels has also been the subject of investigation. Metabolic clearance declines with age but this effect is less pronounced than a reduction in testosterone production, so the overall effect is to reduce serum testosterone levels. Gonadotrophin levels rise during aging (Feldman et al 2002) and testicular secretory responses to recombinant human chorionic gonadotrophin (hCG) are reduced (Mulligan et al 1999, 2001). This implies that the reduced production may be caused by primary testicular failure but in fact these changes are not adequate to fully explain the fall in testosterone levels. There are changes in the lutenising hormone (LH) production which consist of decreased LH pulse frequency and amplitude, (Veldhuis et al 1992; Pincus et al 1997) although pituitary production of LH in response to pharmacological stimulation with exogenous GnRH analogues is preserved (Mulligan et al 1999). It therefore seems likely that there are changes in endogenous production of GnRH which underlie the changes in LH secretion and have a role in the age related decline in testosterone. Thus the decreases in testosterone levels with aging seem to reflect changes at all levels of the hypothalamic-pituitary-testicular axis. With advancing age there is also a reduction in androgen receptor concentration in some target tissues and this may contribute to the clinical syndrome of LOH (Ono et al 1988; Gallon et al 1989).
I was born with a rare genetic disorder called Klinefelter’s syndrome. My parents actually were known about my condition prior to birth. I’m 25 years old and have been on TRT since 8th grade. It’s a permanent part of life and essential to ultimate happiness, motivation, and the pursuit of bigger and better things. I currently face problems at this time in life due to the endocrinologists. It seems when I bring a problem or question to them, they don’t take charge and figure it out. There all pushed off to the side and left for no one; so now I’ve gotten rid of them and I’m in pursuit of a doctor who will improve the quality of my life. Also with my last doctor I was able to retrieve enough testosterone to perform my out ethical experiment with Testosterone. I injected myself every 5 days for a period of 3 months at the dosage of .75ml. The outcome was amazing. My mind, body, and spirit were one. The energy was phenomenal and in demand. I was able to pursue my endeavors with the energy provided, I was able to think about running and exercising and then put that thought into action. I took extensive notes in the form of a journal to create the ultimate needed dosage for myself. The only reason it ended in three months, was due to no more medicine. It had to be done. Now I’m off to find a doctor to work with me.

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Alcohol has constantly been shown to lower testosterone levels. It’s even worse if you’re a heavy beer drinker. Wanna know why? Because beer raises your estrogen levels due to the phytoestrogens that are produced from the hops used to make beer. If that’s not enough, studies have shown that alcoholics have lower levels of testosterone than non-alcoholics.
Free testosterone (T) is transported into the cytoplasm of target tissue cells, where it can bind to the androgen receptor, or can be reduced to 5α-dihydrotestosterone (DHT) by the cytoplasmic enzyme 5α-reductase. DHT binds to the same androgen receptor even more strongly than testosterone, so that its androgenic potency is about 5 times that of T.[118] The T-receptor or DHT-receptor complex undergoes a structural change that allows it to move into the cell nucleus and bind directly to specific nucleotide sequences of the chromosomal DNA. The areas of binding are called hormone response elements (HREs), and influence transcriptional activity of certain genes, producing the androgen effects.

In fact, studies on vegetarian and low-fat diets both show reduced testosterone levels of about 12 percent. Where higher fat diets of at least 40 percent of calories, with a higher intake of saturated fat, show increased testosterone levels. Why? It’s not rocket science. After all, cholesterol makes up the building blocks from which testosterone is formed; without it, the hormone simply can’t synthesize. Organic eggs are one of the best dietary sources. In addition to essential fatty acids, a whole egg is rich in aspartic acid, an amino acid that triggers production of testosterone.
It also had a purpose. It turns out posing in powerful stances causes your testosterone to increase within 20 minutes [13,14]. In those two studies, power posing for just a few minutes also dropped cortisol and boosted confidence. It’s a great way to start your day, or to give yourself an edge before a job interview or a big presentation. They don’t call it “warrior pose” for nothing!
The potential downside of this positive feedback loop, Coates argues, is that testosterone levels can eventually surge past optimal levels and have the opposite effect – leading to overconfidence and poor decision-making. When this happens to animals, Coates, observed, they “go out in the open, pick too many fights [and] patrol areas that are too large…Risk taking becomes risky behaviour.”
Ginger is considered a safe herbal medicine with only few and insignificant adverse/side effects [1]. Some minor adverse effects such as mild diarrhea have been associated with the use of ginger in humans [19]. Ginger may also cause heartburn and at much higher doses act as a gastric irritant [19]. One study carried out on male diabetic rats concluded that extracts of Zingiber officinale have high safety and intake of Zingiber officinale roots as a drink may be useful for diabetic patients who suffer from sexual impotency [20].
I have a large potion of my bowel removed resilting in me not digesting properly and shitting uncontrollably and an immovable staphs infection in my nose (due to pharmaceuticals) to deal with now, which as you can imagine inhibits me. Its these two last problems I’m looking to over come. I think this info in this article will help me a lot and so i want to say thanks to you (long winded i know) and see if you have ny other ideas for me to try.
Testosterone was first used as a clinical drug as early as 1937, but with little understanding of its mechanisms. The hormone is now widely prescribed to men whose bodies naturally produce low levels. But the levels at which testosterone deficiency become medically relevant still aren’t well understood. Normal testosterone production varies widely in men, so it’s difficult to know what levels have medical significance. The hormone’s mechanisms of action are also unclear.
“I'm 55 years old and hitting the ball further than I've ever hit, and I'm not getting tired going 18 holes! And when I play softball I'm hitting the ball further. I work for the DWP in LA and it's a very physically demanding job. Andro400 really helps because we work 16 hour days a lot. I was turning down a lot of overtime, but when I started taking Andro400, it got me through the day. I really notice a difference – even my wife did. It really works!”
If you do take DAA I recommend cycling it (i.e. 5 days on, 2 off, over 4 weeks then 4 weeks off). And taking it with an aromatase inhibitor (which ensures the aspartic acid doesn’t get converted to estrogen). Especially as more studies are coming out showing the increase in testosterone is limited to a week or two before it drops back to normal levels.
There have been case reports of development of prostate cancer in patients during treatment with testosterone, including one case series of twenty patients (Gaylis et al 2005). It is not known whether this reflects an increase in incidence, as prostate cancer is very common and because the monitoring for cancer in patients treated with testosterone is greater. Randomized controlled trials of testosterone treatment have found a low incidence of prostate cancer and they do not provide evidence of a link between testosterone treatment and the development of prostate cancer (Rhoden and Morgentaler 2004). More large scale clinical trials of longer durations of testosterone replacement are required to confirm that testosterone treatment does not cause prostate cancer. Overall, it is not known whether testosterone treatment of aging males with hypogonadism increases the risk of prostate cancer, but monitoring for the condition is clearly vital. This should take the form of PSA blood test and rectal examination every three months for the first year of treatment and yearly thereafter (Nieschlag et al 2005). Age adjusted PSA reference ranges should be used to identify men who require further assessment. The concept of PSA velocity is also important and refers to the rate of increase in PSA per year. Patients with abnormal rectal examination suggestive of prostate cancer, PSA above the age specific reference range or a PSA velocity greater than 0.75 ng/ml/yr should be referred to a urologist for consideration of prostate biopsy.
Testosterone is a hormone that is produced primarily in the testicles for men and the ovaries and adrenal glands for women. This hormone is essential to the development of male growth and masculine characteristics. For women, testosterone comes in much smaller amounts. Testosterone production increases about 30 times more during adolescence and early adulthood. After early adulthood, it’s natural for levels to drop slightly each year. Your body may see a one percent decline after you’re 30 years old.
In 2002, the federally sponsored Women’s Health Initiative (WHI) stopped its hormone replacement therapy (HRT) trial (estrogen plus progestin), which included more than 16,000 women, three years early because those taking the pills had an increased risk of developing breast cancer and blood clots, and an increased risk of suffering a stroke or heart attack than those taking a placebo. The findings ran counter to the long-held belief that HRT could preserve health — and trim heart-disease risk in women.

Thus, alcohol metabolism destroys the essential coenzyme required for T synthesis. Alcohol also contributes to the release of special endorphins which inhibit hormone production. In addition, drinking too much alcohol leads to the elevation of estrogen levels in men because of the conversion of testosterone in estrogen. It means that T levels come down with a run.
‘Testosterone boosting’ products  - found online, or in health food or body-building shops, these products claim to boost testosterone levels if you buy them. The majority of these products will not have the effect you want and are not worth spending money on. Any of these products that do have a real effect may have a form of prescription medication in which is both dangerous and illegal.
Vitamin D3. Vitamin D3 actually isn’t a vitamin, it’s a hormone — a really important hormone that provides a whole host of health benefits. Our bodies can naturally make vitamin D from the sun, but recent studies have shown that many Westerners are vitamin D3 deprived because we’re spending less and less time outdoors. When we do decide to venture outside, we slather our bodies with sunscreen, which prevents the sun reaching our skin to kick-off vitamin D3 production. If you’re not getting enough sun, you may have a vitamin D3 deficiency, which may contribute to low T levels. If you think you need more vitamin D3, supplement it with a pill. Studies have shown that men who take this supplement see a boost in their testosterone levels. Because I have a darker complexion — which makes me prone to Vitamin D3 deficiency — I took 4,000 IU of vitamin D3 in the morning.
If you're looking for a miracle pill, this one is NOT one either. But if you're looking for a supplement that works as good as any out there in the market for an unbelievable price, please buy this product. It works after a short period of consistently taking the product and the results are noticeable in the gym as well as on your person. Whether you buy this as a training supplement or a male vitality enhancer, you won't be disappointed.
Cross-sectional studies have found a positive association between serum testosterone and some measures of cognitive ability in men (Barrett-Connor, Goodman-Gruen et al 1999; Yaffe et al 2002). Longitudinal studies have found that free testosterone levels correlate positively with future cognitive abilities and reduced rate of cognitive decline (Moffat et al 2002) and that, compared with controls, testosterone levels are reduced in men with Alzheimer’s disease at least 10 years prior to diagnosis (Moffat et al 2004). Studies of the effects of induced androgen deficiency in patients with prostate cancer have shown that profoundly lowering testosterone leads to worsening cognitive functions (Almeida et al 2004; Salminen et al 2004) and increased levels of serum amyloid (Gandy et al 2001; Almeida et al 2004), which is central to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease (Parihar and Hemnani 2004). Furthermore, testosterone reduces amyloid-induced hippocampal neurotoxity in vitro (Pike 2001) as well as exhibiting other neuroprotective effects (Pouliot et al 1996). The epidemiological and experimental data propose a potential role of testosterone in protecting cognitive function and preventing Alzheimer’s disease.
*IMPORTANT TESTOSTERONE TREATMENT WARNING: Who Should Not Enroll in Testosterone Replacement Therapy? Men who have or had prostate cancer or breast cancer should not take testosterone replacement therapy. All men considering treatment should undergo a thorough prostate cancer screening prior to starting any therapy program with a rectal exam and PSA test. *Men who have or have had cardiovascular disease, or are at risk for coronary disease, or have had a history of heart disease may not be candidates for testosterone treatment. Blood testing, thorough physical examination and careful screening by your physician is absolutely essential before considering a hormone therapy program of any kind. Always discuss the potential benefits, uses, side effects and risks of prescription hormones and steroid drugs with your treating physician. Hormone Treatment is for medically qualified candidates only. The FDA has cautions about using testosterone products for low testosterone due to aging; requires labeling change to inform of possible increased risk of heart attack and stroke with use - FDA Testosterone Safety Update 

I’m 56 and 5 years ago dropped to 270 with all the side effects listed for low test. After trying shots and not liking the roller coaster effect, I switched to gels. Androgel and Axiron had too low a dosage and far too messy. They need to not call them gels but liquids. If it pours like water it’s a liquid. My doctor recommended a compounding Pharmacy that made a cream and it was perfect. It had a click dispenser that looked like a deoderant that would pre-measure the dosage and I could rub it on my arms and shoulders or on my neck, really anywhere not covered in hair but the thinner the skin the better. It dried instantly so I could get dressed in a couple minutes. My totals never got out of the 400’s until I started the 150mg daily cream dosage, then they hovered around 700. The down side was Insurance didn’t cover it and I had to pay $50 a month vs free shots from the doctors office or $10 for the so-called gels. Bad news is it has now doubled in price due to new Federal production regs on compounding Pharms. Now, I am going back on the shots which I now have to buy the vile for $125 for 10 doses and have to take it to my doctor to administer it every 2wks while I am looking into bioidentical pellet implants.
The sad truth, is that these purported testosterone support products were completely and utterly useless. They did absolutely nothing for testosterone production due to the simple fact that they didn’t contain any ingredients shown in human research trials to actually support testosterone production. Sure, they included all sorts of ancient herbs and botanical extracts that worked well in rats, but nary a compound that would actually benefit a real live human being.
A: Depo-Testosterone is a brand name medication that contains testosterone cypionate. Depo-Testosterone is given as an intramuscular injection. The medication is indicated for replacement therapy for men that have conditions associated with symptoms of deficiency in the hormone or absence of testosterone produced in the body. Conditions that can be associated with low testosterone include: delayed puberty, impotence and hormonal imbalances. Testosterone is a sex hormone that is naturally produced in the male testicles. In women, small amounts of testosterone is produced in the ovaries and by the adrenal system. Testosterone is available in various medications for testosterone replacement therapy. Different forms of testosterone (e.g. cypionate, enanthate etc) are contained in different brand name medications. Jen Marsico, RPh
A4M, which stands for “The American Academy of Anti-Aging Medicine” is dedicated to the advancement of tools, technology, and transformations in healthcare that can detect, treat, and prevent diseases associated with aging. They promote the research of practices and protocols that have the potential to optimize the human aging process. The organization is also dedicated to educating healthcare professionals and practitioners, scientists, and members of the public on biomedical sciences, breakthrough technologies, and medical protocols through our advanced education entity: Metabolic Medical Institute (MMI). Their event in Vegas each year is, in my opinion, well worth checking out.
Note that DHT is what causes male pattern baldness so it stands to reason that fenugreek may delay the balding process.  A quick Google search of “fenugreek and baldness” reveals that I am not the only genius struck with this idea.  There are sites out there that claim that a fenugreek+saw palmetto concoction or applying a fenugreek paste can help prevent Mr. Cleanitis.

To date, no large, double-blind, randomized controlled studies of a link between testosterone treatment and prostate cancer have been completed. In its 2004 report, the Institute of Medicine (IOM) committee studying the need for clinical trials of testosterone-replacement therapy noted that only 31 placebo-controlled studies had been done in older men, with the largest one enrolling just 108 participants. Most of these studies lasted only six months.
A team led by Dr. Joel Finkelstein at Massachusetts General Hospital investigated testosterone and estradiol levels in 400 healthy men, 20 to 50 years of age. To control hormone levels, the researchers first gave the participants injections of a drug that suppressed their normal testosterone and estradiol production. The men were randomly assigned to 5 groups that received different amounts (from 0 to 10 grams) of a topical 1% testosterone gel daily for 16 weeks. Half of the participants were also given a drug to block testosterone from being converted to estradiol.
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