A loophole in FDA regulations allows pharmaceutical marketers to urge men to talk to their doctors if they have certain "possible signs" of testosterone deficiency. "Virtually everybody asks about this now because the direct-to-consumer marketing is so aggressive," says Dr. Michael O'Leary, a urologist at Harvard-affiliated Brigham and Women's Hospital. "Tons of men who would never have asked me about it before started to do so when they saw ads that say 'Do you feel tired?'"

The hypogonadal-obesity-adipocytokine cycle hypothesis. Adipose tissue contains the enzyme aromatase which metabolises testosterone to oestrogen. This results in reduced testosterone levels, which increase the action of lipoprotein lipase and increase fat mass, thus increasing aromatisation of testosterone and completing the cycle. Visceral fat also promotes lower testosterone levels by reducing pituitary LH pulse amplitude via leptin and/or other factors. In vitro studies have shown that leptin also inhibits testosterone production directly at the testes. Visceral adiposity could also provide the link between testosterone and insulin resistance (Jones 2007).


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Feeling low energy, lack of enthusiasm, but not so much on the sexual side, seems okay. At age 63 started an exercise program. nothing seem to help bring me back, so had my blood test at age 64. 150. 6 months later 165. My doctor started me on testosterone patches after a heart and prostate exam. Now two months into program, now using the gel, there seems little change. Disappointed. I am guess my next blood test will show less than 200. I am disappointed sufficiently to decide not to continue the program. I mean, the drugs cost $500 a month, although my cost is less. I guess my question is if I quit the program, will my body return to its normal, or will it be worse. i can live with a low normal, but less would not not be acceptable.
In this podcast, I will review the key biomarkers for achieving peak male health, along with the most potent and effective practices for optimizing biological variables for men's fertility and longevity. I will also unveil a host of little-known biohacks proven to enhance or restore peak testosterone and drive, along with how to practically implement a blend of ancestral wisdom and modern science to amplify sexual performance.
Unfortunately, in the modern world, stresses and emotional exhaustion lie in wait for men at every step. Nowadays, burnout is a constant state for many men. Of course, this causes great harm to the men’s health. Stresses drain of vitality and affect emotional state. Besides, they are also very dangerous for the nervous system. The nature is wise. And the body of a man who is not subject to stress can produce more testosterone.

Mood disturbance and dysthymia are part of the clinical syndrome of hypogonadism. Epidemiological studies have found a positive association between testosterone levels and mood, and depressed aging males have lower testosterone levels than controls (Barrett-Connor, Von Muhlen et al 1999). Furthermore, induction of a hypogonadal state during treatment of men for prostate cancer leads to an increase in depression scores (Almeida et al 2004). Trials of testosterone treatment effects on mood have varied in outcome. Data on the effects on men with depression are conflicting (Seidman et al 2001; Pope et al 2003) but there is evidence that testosterone treatment of older hypogonadal men does result in improvements in mood (Wang et al 1996) and that this may occur through changes in regional brain perfusion (Azad et al 2003).
Herein lies the problem.  DHT is an extremely powerful androgen, significantly more potent than testosterone.  Somehow, fenugreek causes increases in muscle mass and libido while reducing DHT.  I often argue on the site that it is not exactly increased testosterone that you want.  You want the blessings of a high testosterone level: physical fitness, libido, and high energy levels.  If fenugreek can bestow these upon you, why do you need the testosterone?
A couple years ago I was having a problem with my thighs burning when walking up stairs. I noticed the muscles in my legs looking smaller. So I had my doc to check my T levels , and it was under 100. So she started me on testosterone injections weekly 200mg . After several injections I felt great , muscles in legs came back , lots of energy everything good . Leveled out at 3 injections a week 100mg , had a T level of 550 . So I go in for my scheduled injection and they tell me there out of testosterone . I might mention, this is a health care facilility that gives financial assistant if needed. And they have 3 or doctors and a nurse practitioner, which was who I was seeing . So I went on to check back often and got the same reply , were out of supply . So finally after months of the same , I gave up . I started loosing wait and my nerves got bad . Was having panic attacks etc. but I was coming off Prozac at the same time so I blamed it all on that. I was so bad with my nerves I ended up in the ER while on vacation . Doc there put me on a med for stress which I’m still using . After close to a year I checked back with the place I was getting TRT and they were resupplyed with testosterone. So I started back up because of low sex drive and ED. My first injection of 200mg was just short of a Marical , nerves felt great ED gone , had a sex drive , lot of energy . Then after 7 days or so all gone bad nerves started back up . He had me scheduled for anouther injection in 4 weeks 100mg . I went in for injection and after a couple days started feeling a little better . Then same thing as before about 7 days later nerves and everything else as before got worse . 3 weeks later I finally got a appt. with this different doc then I use to have . Told him the problems I was having , which included a horrible down mood , no energy . He decided to start injections every 2 weeks and upped the dose slitley. It’s been 5 days and already noticing ED problem reaccuring . He’s worried about the threat of prostate cancer. And doesn’t want to add any more injection to the schedule. I guess I’m going to have to start seeing the nurse practitioner who seemed to be more liberal and informed about TRT. I feel once a week injection is what it will take to get feeling good again. I’m 57 now with good health . Just need to get my T level on track with a doctor that will listen to how his patient is feeling . My last T level was at 365 . I failed to mention before I started the injections I was on androgel Dailey , 5 pumps a day . Then he gave me the injection of 200mg test . That’s when I felt fantastic for about a week or so . Then down hill . And I wanted to switch because the injection just seem so much better and they are . I noticed a big difference.
Clinical trials of the effect of testosterone on glucose metabolism in men have occurred in diabetic and non-diabetic populations. Data specific to aging males is not available. A series of studies investigated the effects of testosterone or dihydrotestosterone given for 6 weeks or 3 months to middle aged, non-diabetic obese men (Marin, Holmang et al 1992; Marin, Krotkiewski et al 1992; Marin et al 1993). It was found that physiological treatment doses led to improved insulin resistance, as measured by the gold standard technique using a euglycemic clamp and/or serum glucose and insulin responses during glucose tolerance test. These improvements were associated with decreased central obesity, measured by computered tomography (CT) or waist-hip ratio, without reduced total fat mass. Insulin resistance improved more with testosterone than dihydrotestosterone treatment and beneficial effects were greater in men with lower baseline testosterone levels. Increasing testosterone levels into the supraphysiological range lead to decreased glucose tolerance.

Testosterone levels peak by early adulthood and drop as you age—about 1% to 2% a year beginning in the 40s. As men reach their 50s and beyond, this may lead to signs and symptoms, such as impotence or changes in sexual desire, depression or anxiety, reduced muscle mass, less energy, weight gain, anemia, and hot flashes. While falling testosterone levels are a normal part of aging, certain conditions can hasten the decline. These include:
Get some sun – I know many people say you should avoid the sun like a vampire unless you want to get skin cancer but we actually do need some sunlight. This is because the sun is the best source of vitamin D which plays a huge role in testosterone production and other bodily functions. Keep your sun exposure in moderation but do not avoid it altogether.
Not exactly. There are a number of drugs that may lessen sex drive, including the BPH drugs finasteride (Proscar) and dutasteride (Avodart). Those drugs can also decrease the amount of the ejaculatory fluid, no question. But a reduction in orgasm intensity usually does not go along with treatment for BPH. Erectile dysfunction does not usually go along with it either, though certainly if somebody has less sex drive or less interest, it’s more of a challenge to get a good erection.
Another point I’d like to make for people worried about a link between high testosterone and prostate cancer is that it just doesn’t make sense. Prostate cancer becomes more prevalent in men as they age, and that’s also when their testosterone levels decline. We almost never see it in men in their peak testosterone years, in their 20s for instance. We know from autopsy studies that 8% of men in their 20s already have tiny prostate cancers, so if testosterone really made prostate cancer grow so rapidly — we used to talk about it like it was pouring gasoline on a fire — we should see some appreciable rate of prostate cancer in men in their 20s. We don’t. So, I’m no longer worried that giving testosterone to men will make their hidden cancer grow, because I’m convinced that it doesn’t happen.
It’s worth emphasizing that these supplements are totally legit. They’re NOT steroids. Meaning, only the natural and harmless ingredients have been used to make these products, which can help the guys dealing with the low testosterone problems, such as low energy, fatigue, muscle loss, irritability, and similar. Usually, the guys tend to start experience these problems in their late 20s and in some cases in their early 30s.
I have used Androgel for 7 years with Testosterone levels between 650 and 900. PSA remained just under 3.0. 2 pumps per day. A year ago I increased my pumps to 4 per day and within a few months my Testosterone was 1,100 BUT my PSA shot up to 5.2. Last April, I totally stopped Androgel and within 2 months my Testosterone was under 20 (really) and PSA was virtually zero. Libido also fell from “strong” to “zero”. After 5 months of no Androgel, I resumed it in September at 2 pumps per day and now my Testosterone has improved to almost 600 and my PSA is just under 3.0. Am having my 3 month check-up with my Urologist tomorrow.
A meta-analysis of nine randomized controlled trials [31] evaluated effects of ginger on net changes in blood glucose and lipid concentrations (total cholesterol, triglyceride, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, high density lipoprotein cholesterol).  In a total of 609 adults with T2DM or hyperlipidemia, ginger supplementation led to significant reductions in plasma levels of total cholesterol, triglycerides, and blood glucose, but non-significant reduction in LDL-c levels.

Margaret, I’m on Trt, and my wife is 43 going through Peri- (early/pre) menopause. She started trying about a drop a day to see if her libido would improve, and it did, dramatically, and also her moods and patience. After about a month of feeling 30again, she started noticing lite facial hair developing, decreased breast size, and return of all previous symptoms. So she went off it. About a month later, she started St.JohnsWart, and everything improved tenfold. Now she feels 20 instead of just 30 on testosterone. She literally glows with smiles and energy, and has an extremely high libido. Maybe try that first. Good luck.

Men who have prostate cancer or breast cancer should not take testosterone replacement therapy. Nor should men who have severe urinary tract problems, untreated severe sleep apnea or uncontrolled heart failure. All men considering testosterone replacement therapy should undergo a thorough prostate cancer screening -- a rectal exam and PSA test -- prior to starting this therapy.
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