At the National Population and Family Development Board in Malaysia, men between the ages of 31 and 52 were given two capsules of the herb (E. longifolia) in Andro400 every day for three weeks. They reported erections were stronger and, in some cases, lasted longer. Overall, they felt more virile. Their levels of testosterone doubled within three weeks.5
Xenoestrogen is a chemical that imitates estrogen in the human body. When men are exposed to too much of this estrogen-imitating chemical, T levels drop significantly. The problem is xenoestrogen is freaking everywhere — plastics, shampoos, gasoline, cows, toothpaste. You name it and chances are there are xenoestrogen in it. The ubiquitous nature of this chemical in our modern world is one reason some endocrinologists believe that testosterone levels are lower in men today than in decades past. It’s also a reason doctors say the number of boys born with hypospadias — a birth defect in which the opening of the urethra is on the underside of the penis and not at the tip — has doubled.  Note to expecting parents: make sure mom stays away from xenoestrogens during the pregnancy.
Dr. Abraham Morgentaler, an associate professor of surgery at Harvard Medical School and the director of Men’s Health Boston, specializes in treating prostate diseases and male sexual and reproductive difficulties. He has developed particular expertise in treating low testosterone levels. In this interview, Dr. Morgentaler shares his views on current controversies, the treatment strategies he uses with his own patients, and why he thinks experts should reconsider the possible link between testosterone-replacement therapy and prostate cancer.

I’m currently 64 y.o. After close to 10 years of twice-weekly injections of 20 units of testosterone cypionate my PSA gradually increased from 4.4 to more than 16. My urologist has performed 4 biopsies and one prostate MRI over that time, all of them negative. The last was 15 months ago. Early last year, after my fluctuating PSA reached 16, I discontinued the injections for about 6 months. My PSA dropped back to 6.1, and by the end of that time, my testosterone levels were about 240 but my libido seemed almost non-existent. I resumed the injections at a reduced level, 15 units, and 3 months later, the testosterone level was in the 700 range but the PSA was back to 16. My doctor told me to discontinue the injections pending another biopsy when I’m 65 in June.(I can’t afford another one immediately because of a high insurance deductible and previous family medical bills.) I am now gradually reducing the injections to 10 units once weekly, in hopes of limiting the withdrawal. Am I playing with fire or doing the right thing and have you had other patients with similar histories?
Xenoestrogen is a chemical that imitates estrogen in the human body. When men are exposed to too much of this estrogen-imitating chemical, T levels drop significantly. The problem is xenoestrogen is freaking everywhere — plastics, shampoos, gasoline, cows, toothpaste. You name it and chances are there are xenoestrogen in it. The ubiquitous nature of this chemical in our modern world is one reason some endocrinologists believe that testosterone levels are lower in men today than in decades past. It’s also a reason doctors say the number of boys born with hypospadias — a birth defect in which the opening of the urethra is on the underside of the penis and not at the tip — has doubled.  Note to expecting parents: make sure mom stays away from xenoestrogens during the pregnancy.
Your diet is the best source of zinc; along with protein-rich foods like meats and fish, other good dietary sources of zinc include raw milk, raw cheese, beans, and yogurt or kefir made from raw milk. It can be difficult to obtain enough dietary zinc if you're a vegetarian, and also for meat-eaters as well, largely because of conventional farming methods that rely heavily on chemical fertilizers and pesticides. These chemicals deplete the soil of nutrients ... nutrients like zinc that must be absorbed by plants in order to be passed on to you.
Testosterone levels generally peak during adolescence and early adulthood. As you get older, your testosterone level gradually declines — typically about 1 percent a year after age 30 or 40. It is important to determine in older men if a low testosterone level is simply due to the decline of normal aging or if it is due to a disease (hypogonadism).
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