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A large number of trials have demonstrated a positive effect of testosterone treatment on bone mineral density (Katznelson et al 1996; Behre et al 1997; Leifke et al 1998; Snyder et al 2000; Zacharin et al 2003; Wang, Cunningham et al 2004; Aminorroaya et al 2005; Benito et al 2005) and bone architecture (Benito et al 2005). These effects are often more impressive in longer trials, which have shown that adequate replacement will lead to near normal bone density but that the full effects may take two years or more (Snyder et al 2000; Wang, Cunningham et al 2004; Aminorroaya et al 2005). Three randomized placebo-controlled trials of testosterone treatment in aging males have been conducted (Snyder et al 1999; Kenny et al 2001; Amory et al 2004). One of these studies concerned men with a mean age of 71 years with two serum testosterone levels less than 12.1nmol/l. After 36 months of intramuscular testosterone treatment or placebo, there were significant increases in vertebral and hip bone mineral density. In this study, there was also a significant decrease in the bone resorption marker urinary deoxypyridinoline with testosterone treatment (Amory et al 2004). The second study contained men with low bioavailable testosterone levels and an average age of 76 years. Testosterone treatment in the form of transdermal patches was given for 1 year. During this trial there was a significant preservation of hip bone mineral density with testosterone treatment but testosterone had no effect on bone mineral density at other sites including the vertebrae. There were no significant alterations in bone turnover markers during testosterone treatment (Kenny et al 2001). The remaining study contained men of average age 73 years. Men were eligible for the study if their serum total testosterone levels were less than 16.5 nmol/L, meaning that the study contained men who would usually be considered eugonadal. The beneficial effects of testosterone on bone density were confined to the men who had lower serum testosterone levels at baseline and were seen only in the vertebrae. There were no significant changes in bone turnover markers. Testosterone in the trial was given via scrotal patches for a 36 month duration (Snyder et al 1999). A recent meta-analysis of the effects on bone density of testosterone treatment in men included data from these studies and two other randomized controlled trials. The findings were that testosterone produces a significant increase of 2.7% in the bone mineral density at the lumber spine but no overall change at the hip (Isidori et al 2005). These results from randomized controlled trials in aging men show much smaller benefits of testosterone treatment on bone density than have been seen in other trials. This could be due to the trials including patients who are not hypogonadal and being too short to allow for the maximal effects of testosterone. The meta-analysis also assessed the data concerning changes of bone formation and resorption markers during testosterone treatment. There was a significant decrease in bone resorption markers but no change in markers of bone formation suggesting that reduction of bone resorption may be the primary mode of action of testosterone in improving bone density (Isidori et al 2005).
Hi Dean, thanks for reaching out bro! While testosterone boosters will help increase your T levels, strength, and libido, you need to make sure you’re eating the right foods and exercising in the right way. What is your current diet and workout plan? Maybe we can help? If you’re serious about getting in shape, a quality testosterone booster can certainly help. If you have a look at our top testosterone booster page, you’ll see TestoFuel is our best choice. If you have any more questions, don’t hesitate to write back! All the best bro, don’t give up, you can do it!
A: According to the NIH, normal values for testosterone levels in men can range from 300 to 1,200ng/dL. There can be many different causes of low testosterone including age, diseases, accidents, and medications. Symptoms of low testosterone may include: loss of sex drive, erectile dysfunction, depressed mood, and difficulty concentrating. Low testosterone levels may also bring around body changes including: hair loss, decrease in blood cells possibly leading to anemia, fragile bones, and a decrease in muscle mass. There are different testosterone replacement therapies including patches, such as Androderm; gels, such as Androgel and Testim; and injections, such as testosterone cypionate. Only your health care provider can decide if and what kind of testosterone replacement therapy is appropriate for you. Testosterone replacement therapy is not right for everyone. Patient with certain prostate issues or breast cancer should not take testosterone. For more specific information, consult with your doctor for guidance based on your health status and current medications, particularly before taking any action. Kristen Dore, PharmD
The IOM report estimated that a study of whether there is an increased risk of prostate cancer in men on testosterone therapy might require following 5,000 men for three to five years. Before launching such an endeavor, the report recommended more firmly establishing the effectiveness of testosterone-replacement therapy, saying that studies of long-term risks and benefits should be conducted only after short-term efficacy has been proven. That means the male equivalent of the WHI remains far off.
After 90 days, it seemed like the Andro Gel kind of stopped having it’s effect. Went back to see the doc, and my levels had dropped back to about 198 from high 200’s. Doc said it’s not unusual that the body gets used to it, and maybe I needed to adjust up. I switched to four pumps per day, and I felt immediate effects. Now…there is a period of ultra-horniness, and sometimes, you will feel some of the “roid rage” at some of these levels. It varies from person to person. Generally, if you are an ass, or high strung, this will amplify it. If you are pretty mellow, you may notice that every once in a while you’ll get angry at something that does matter, but again, it’s different person to person.
More people are realizing the functions and benefits of supplementing their respective workout regimen with testosterone boosters. As a result, these supps are gaining more and more popularity. The higher-demand for testosterone boosters started when numerous studies revealed the dangers of anabolic steroids, which may damage the natural production of testosterone.
Men on long-term testosterone appear to have a higher risk of cardiovascular problems, like heart attacks, strokes, and deaths from heart disease. For example, in 2010, researchers halted the Testosterone in Older Men study when early results showed that men on hormone treatments had noticeably more heart problems. "In older men, theoretical cardiac side effects become a little more immediate," Dr. Pallais says.
In the hepatic 17-ketosteroid pathway of testosterone metabolism, testosterone is converted in the liver by 5α-reductase and 5β-reductase into 5α-DHT and the inactive 5β-DHT, respectively.[1][155] Then, 5α-DHT and 5β-DHT are converted by 3α-HSD into 3α-androstanediol and 3α-etiocholanediol, respectively.[1][155] Subsequently, 3α-androstanediol and 3α-etiocholanediol are converted by 17β-HSD into androsterone and etiocholanolone, which is followed by their conjugation and excretion.[1][155] 3β-Androstanediol and 3β-etiocholanediol can also be formed in this pathway when 5α-DHT and 5β-DHT are acted upon by 3β-HSD instead of 3α-HSD, respectively, and they can then be transformed into epiandrosterone and epietiocholanolone, respectively.[157][158] A small portion of approximately 3% of testosterone is reversibly converted in the liver into androstenedione by 17β-HSD.[156]

Testosterone may improve cognitive ability. Not only have studies shown that there is a link between testosterone levels and Alzheimer’s, they’ve also shown a link between T levels and overall cognitive ability, particularly in older men. One such study performed by Dutch researchers found a direct linear relationship between T levels and cognitive function, while other studies have found a linear relationship between memory loss and T levels. Because of these correlations, many researchers believe testosterone plays a role in preventing brain tissue decay in elderly men. The hormone’s connection to cognition explains why some of the symptoms of low T in men are memory loss, trouble concentrating, and “fogginess.”
I am 35 and had the non sexual symptoms for awhile now( weight gain/muscle loss, extreme fatigue, lack of clarity/concentration) I got my testosterone levels checked last week and it was 35.4 ng. Not a typo, 35.4. I was told by my dr. That I needed to start TRT right away as low t can effect a lot different things in your body. I did my first injection last night (200mg/ml every 2 weeks) about 8 pm and td now 3:30 am and I’m wide awake and feel extremely motivated to go to the gym and work out. I know each person is different but should I feel like this already, or is it a placebo effect at this point?
^ Butenandt A, Hanisch G (1935). "Umwandlung des Dehydroandrosterons in Androstendiol und Testosterone; ein Weg zur Darstellung des Testosterons aus Cholestrin" [About Testosterone. Conversion of Dehydro-androsterons into androstendiol and testosterone; a way for the structure assignment of testosterone from cholesterol]. Hoppe-Seyler's Z Physiol Chem (in German). 237 (2): 89–97. doi:10.1515/bchm2.1935.237.1-3.89.
I have been on TRT for over 8 years now. I feel GREAT! I read all these studies, hear in the news, and see all these dumb lawsuit commercials about testosterone causing cardiovascular events, blood clots and many other things. If anyone takes the time to do the due diligence and read the studies the picture becomes very clear. Unless you monitor all the other hormones, specifically, Estradiol, DHT, Pregenolone, Total Testosterone, Free Direct Testosterone, and DHEAS you are playing a deadly game. The reason is you must give something to control the pathways of T conversion into estradiol and or DHT. The vast majority of the studies used nothing to control those pathways and they gave men way, way more T than they needed to start with. They also gave forms of T that are not acceptable. Especially the oral version.
Cognitive abilities differ between males and females and these differences are present from childhood. In broad terms, girls have stronger verbal skills than boys who tend to have stronger skills related to spatial ability (Linn and Petersen 1985). It is thought that the actions of sex hormones have a role in these differences. Reviewing different cognitive strengths of male versus female humans is not within the scope of this article but the idea that cognition could be altered by testosterone deserves attention.
That said, magnesium is one of a few ingredients demonstrated to impact testosterone levels. Researchers at Italy’s University of Palermo found that magnesium improved participants’ anabolic hormone status — including their testosterone levels. In a follow-up study, they confirm that even adjusting for age differences in their participant group, “magnesium was positively associated with total testosterone.” They propose that magnesium supplementation might help improve muscle performance in aging men — a group particularly vulnerable to declining/low testosterone levels. Outside of Italy, researchers at Turkey’s Selçuk University found that magnesium supplementation increased testosterone levels for both athletes and more sedentary men alike.
In non-human primates, it may be that testosterone in puberty stimulates sexual arousal, which allows the primate to increasingly seek out sexual experiences with females and thus creates a sexual preference for females.[39] Some research has also indicated that if testosterone is eliminated in an adult male human or other adult male primate's system, its sexual motivation decreases, but there is no corresponding decrease in ability to engage in sexual activity (mounting, ejaculating, etc.).[39]

Fenugreek is an enigma, deep-fried in a mystery, and wrapped in secrecy. It can actually LOWER your testosterone levels while simultaneously increasing your libido and athletic performance, 2 effects that correlate with elevated testosterone levels.  Strange.  This is the first supplement I have come across that might have the opposite of the desired effect, and yet be worth taking anyway.
Zinc deficiency also negatively affects testosterone levels, according a 2014 article in the Journal of Plant Biochemistry and Physiology. The authors of this review note that zinc supplementation can increase circulating testosterone in some populations. In fact, daily supplementation with typical doses may double testosterone within a few months.
Remember that each person is unique, and each body responds differently to treatment. TT may help erectile function, low sex drive, bone marrow density, anemia, lean body mass, and/or symptoms of depression. However, there is no strong evidence that TT will help memory recall, measures of diabetes, energy, tiredness, lipid profiles, or quality of life.
I started doing prostate biopsies before putting men on testosterone therapy because the fear had always been that a hidden cancer might grow due to increased testosterone. It was also believed that low testosterone was protective. Well, we found prostate cancer in one of the first men with low testosterone we biopsied, even though his PSA level and digital rectal exam (DRE) were normal. As we did more of these, we found more and more cases, about one out of seven, despite normal DRE and normal PSA. When we had data for 77 men and the cancer rate was about the same, 14%, the Journal of the American Medical Association published our findings. At the time, that rate of prostate cancer in men with normal PSA was several times higher than anything published previously, and it approximated the risk of men who had an elevated PSA or an abnormal DRE. That was in 1996.

A meta-analysis of nine randomized controlled trials [31] evaluated effects of ginger on net changes in blood glucose and lipid concentrations (total cholesterol, triglyceride, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, high density lipoprotein cholesterol).  In a total of 609 adults with T2DM or hyperlipidemia, ginger supplementation led to significant reductions in plasma levels of total cholesterol, triglycerides, and blood glucose, but non-significant reduction in LDL-c levels.
It also has vitamin B6. One study called out folate and vitamins B6 and B12 as important nutrients for athletes to achieve optimal health and performance. Vitamin B6 is commonly found in food, like fortified cereals, and as with magnesium, it’s possible to have too much vitamin B6. The NIH recommends an upper daily limit for adults of 100mg per day. Beast Sports comes well under this limit at 10mg per day, but still well above the minimum recommended dose of 1.7mg needed to see benefits.
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Both Beast Sports’ Super Test and iSatori’s ISA-Test contain a proprietary blend, which means they don’t disclose the amount of each and every ingredient in the mix. This is only a problem if there is an ingredient tucked into a proprietary blend for which we need to know an amount, like magnesium and zinc. While none of the ingredients in Beast Sports’s proprietary blend raised any red flags, iSatori’s blend contains melatonin, a hormone that helps regulate sleep. Melatonin is an ingredient that has a hard upper limit — Healthline suggests at most 10mg for an adult — and even lower doses can interact poorly with many medications. Since we can’t confirm whether the amount of melatonin in iSatori’s proprietary blend is under 10mg, we cut iSatori.
"Some say it's just a part of aging, but that's a misconception," says Jason Hedges, MD, PhD, a urologist at Oregon Health and Science University in Portland. A gradual decline in testosterone can't explain a near-total lack of interest in sex, for example. And for Hedges' patients who are in their 20s, 30s, and early 40s and having erectile problems, other health problems may be a bigger issue than aging.
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