The partial synthesis in the 1930s of abundant, potent testosterone esters permitted the characterization of the hormone's effects, so that Kochakian and Murlin (1936) were able to show that testosterone raised nitrogen retention (a mechanism central to anabolism) in the dog, after which Allan Kenyon's group[190] was able to demonstrate both anabolic and androgenic effects of testosterone propionate in eunuchoidal men, boys, and women. The period of the early 1930s to the 1950s has been called "The Golden Age of Steroid Chemistry",[191] and work during this period progressed quickly. Research in this golden age proved that this newly synthesized compound—testosterone—or rather family of compounds (for many derivatives were developed from 1940 to 1960), was a potent multiplier of muscle, strength, and well-being.[192]
One thing that is often overlooked when it comes to testosterone boosters is the dosing. Test boosters aren’t like other supplements where you can just take the one dosing per day and forget about until the next day. As with any supplement, it only stays in your system for 4-8 hours. This means you need to be taking more than one dose per day. 2 doses are better but it still is not enough. If you want to keep your test levels up all day you will need to be taking at least 3 and preferably 4 doses per day to keep your testosterone levels high throughout the day and to keep them from dropping between doses. You should also be sure to take them every day and try to not miss any doses to get the most out of them.
I’ve also got a thyroid nodule (benign), and should have it burned out very soon. So I’ve been battling a little more than low T for several years to say the least… a lot of the symptoms of low T can overlap with hyper and/or hypothyroidism… I highly recommend having your TSH, T4 and T3 levels checked along with your Testosterone for anyone experiencing symptoms.
The oldest form is an injection, which we still use because it’s inexpensive and because we reliably get good testosterone levels in nearly everybody. The disadvantage is that a man needs to come in every few weeks to get a shot. A roller-coaster effect can also occur as blood testosterone levels peak and then return to baseline. [See “Exogenous vs. endogenous testosterone,” above.]
Benefits: Tongkat Ali works by stimulating the pituitary glands and hypothalamus glands to produce natural testosterone past it’s peak. It also blocks excessive cortisol production. Cortisol turns excessive testosterone into estrogen. Ingredients in the Tongkat ali allows the body to produce testosterone at a steady rate to increase free testosterone while lowering cortisol.
There are two ways that we determine whether somebody has low testosterone. One is a blood test and the other is by characteristic symptoms and signs, and the correlation between those two methods is far from perfect. Generally men with the lowest testosterone have the most symptoms and men with highest testosterone have the least. But there are some men who have low levels of testosterone in their blood and have no symptoms.
The science backs up the soldier’s self discovery, in fact, exposure to radiation (whether it’s from an army radar or the cell phone in your pocket, or the wifi router in your house) has been shown to lower sperm quality, fertility and testosterone. This is true not only for military personnel (88, 89,90) but all males living in a modern world (91).

^ Mehta PH, Jones AC, Josephs RA (Jun 2008). "The social endocrinology of dominance: basal testosterone predicts cortisol changes and behavior following victory and defeat" (PDF). Journal of Personality and Social Psychology. 94 (6): 1078–93. CiteSeerX 10.1.1.336.2502. doi:10.1037/0022-3514.94.6.1078. PMID 18505319. Archived from the original (PDF) on April 19, 2009.
Hello there Abraham. My doc and you know each other well. We reside in Richmond, VA. Doc told me to inject my weekly Cypionate into sub fat for longer absorption, with reference you shared this info him with him. I have been his TRT patient for 10 years now. He is the best. I wont mention names. Please point me to a study showing the results of testosterone absorption from fat.
Like other steroid hormones, testosterone is derived from cholesterol (see figure).[128] The first step in the biosynthesis involves the oxidative cleavage of the side-chain of cholesterol by cholesterol side-chain cleavage enzyme (P450scc, CYP11A1), a mitochondrial cytochrome P450 oxidase with the loss of six carbon atoms to give pregnenolone. In the next step, two additional carbon atoms are removed by the CYP17A1 (17α-hydroxylase/17,20-lyase) enzyme in the endoplasmic reticulum to yield a variety of C19 steroids.[129] In addition, the 3β-hydroxyl group is oxidized by 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase to produce androstenedione. In the final and rate limiting step, the C17 keto group androstenedione is reduced by 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase to yield testosterone.

If men’s brain, muscles, and bones are being affected daily due to low testosterone, and it is what makes men, men, why aren’t we doing more about this serious health problem? Could there be a political correctness crept in the scientific community that is hindering newly invigorated research in this area? I thought that scientific inquiry suppose to go where the evidence leads. It appears that some honest experts are opening their eyes to this truth.
Testosterone makes you angry. This is probably the most common myth about T. The reality is that there’s no concrete evidence that high testosterone levels cause anger and violent outbursts. In fact, the opposite might be true; low testosterone, not high T, is what causes anger and irritability in men. As discussed above, having low T levels has been linked to depression in men and it just so happens that two of the primary symptoms of depression in men are increased angry outbursts and irritability. So if you’re chronically angry, you might be depressed, and you might be depressed because you have low T. As I mentioned above, I became less moody and irritable during my experiment, which I attribute to the boost in my testosterone levels.
It seems that adequate testosterone levels are an important influence on sexual symptoms in the aging male and also influence the response of men to PDE-5 inhibitors, the first line treatment for erectile dysfunction in men. Many would now suggest screening for testosterone deficiency in all men presenting with erectile dysfunction (Gore and Rajfer 2004; Shabsigh 2005). This would seem appropriate because, in addition to benefits on sexual function, identification and treatment of hypogonadal men with testosterone could improve other symptoms of hypogonadism and protect against other conditions such as osteoporosis.
I am generally dubious about supplement claims & have tried a few other Testosterone boosters which had no effect I could tell. Being desperate to find something to help me feel better, I ordered Dr Martin's T Booster. It arrived on May 14th and after the first day I felt better & noticeably had more energy. I don't have that tired dead feeling every morning now when trying to get out of bed. I am able to do some work & physical activities without being exhausted to the point of being sick. I have been taking Dr Martin's T-Booster for 8 days now. While I am not out running marathons yet, I am feeling much better & hope to continue getting better as I keep taking it
Of course, testosterone’s primary function is to bring about secondary sexual characteristics in men. A healthy dose of testosterone is shown to treat conditions such as impotence. Men with fertility issues benefit from increased levels of testosterone in the body. The aging process slows down the rate of testosterone production by the adrenals and testes. It is irreversible and one of the only means to mediate the effects of low testosterone concentration is to include testosterone boosting agents in your regimen.
The study population in these TTrials included men aged 65 years or older with mean morning serum testosterone concentrations of 275 ng/dL or less and symptoms of impaired sexual function, physical function, or vitality. These trials were placebo-controlled and the testosterone treatment group received 1% testosterone gel at variable doses adjusted to maintain plasma testosterone at levels normal for young men (500-800 ng/dL).
Another way to look at it is like this: Women are only capable of building a small amount of muscle without the use of performance enhancers, regardless of how hard they train or how rigid their meal plan is. When women reach their physical peak and are unable to move any further than that point, it’s because of their naturally low levels of testosterone.
Ten healthy men aged around 24 years old spent 1 week sleeping for 8 hours per night at home, they then spent the next 11 nights in a lab. They slept for 10 hours per night for 3 nights, followed by 8 nights of restricted sleep, when they slept for only 5 hours. Doctors checked their blood every 15 to 30 minutes during the last night that they slept 10 hours, as well as on the sleep-restricted session.
I bought most of the ingredients for my Testosterone Salad at Whole Foods. For those curious, I added up all the ingredients and divided by six (I typically ate six of these salads in a week). The cost per salad was roughly $5. That’s about the price many folks pay every day for a crappy fast food meal. If you’re on a budget, I’m sure you could get the ingredients at Walmart and bring the cost per salad down even more.

Clinical trials of the effect of testosterone on glucose metabolism in men have occurred in diabetic and non-diabetic populations. Data specific to aging males is not available. A series of studies investigated the effects of testosterone or dihydrotestosterone given for 6 weeks or 3 months to middle aged, non-diabetic obese men (Marin, Holmang et al 1992; Marin, Krotkiewski et al 1992; Marin et al 1993). It was found that physiological treatment doses led to improved insulin resistance, as measured by the gold standard technique using a euglycemic clamp and/or serum glucose and insulin responses during glucose tolerance test. These improvements were associated with decreased central obesity, measured by computered tomography (CT) or waist-hip ratio, without reduced total fat mass. Insulin resistance improved more with testosterone than dihydrotestosterone treatment and beneficial effects were greater in men with lower baseline testosterone levels. Increasing testosterone levels into the supraphysiological range lead to decreased glucose tolerance.
Vitamin D, a steroid hormone, is essential for the healthy development of the nucleus of the sperm cell, and helps maintain semen quality and sperm count. Vitamin D also increases levels of testosterone, which may boost libido. In one study, overweight men who were given vitamin D supplements had a significant increase in testosterone levels after one year.5
Testosterone may strengthen your heart. Research on testosterone’s relation to heart health is split. Some scientists have found that men with higher testosterone levels have an increased risk of heart disease, while recent studies have shown that men with below-normal T levels are more at risk for heart problems. The research is still on-going, but many doctors find the evidence compelling that optimal testosterone levels can help prevent cardiovascular disease.

^ Southren AL, Gordon GG, Tochimoto S, Pinzon G, Lane DR, Stypulkowski W (May 1967). "Mean plasma concentration, metabolic clearance and basal plasma production rates of testosterone in normal young men and women using a constant infusion procedure: effect of time of day and plasma concentration on the metabolic clearance rate of testosterone". The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism. 27 (5): 686–94. doi:10.1210/jcem-27-5-686. PMID 6025472.
From there, you’ll want to adjust how you train, since certain activities provide an especially powerful stimulus for testosterone. Research published in the journal Sports Medicine found that in order to experience a strong testosterone response from exercise, your workouts should be high in volume and produce a metabolic response. Churn through many exercises, sets, and reps, and focus on intense bursts of exercise with short rest periods.

Growth of spermatogenic tissue in testicles, male fertility, penis or clitoris enlargement, increased libido and frequency of erection or clitoral engorgement occurs. Growth of jaw, brow, chin, and nose and remodeling of facial bone contours, in conjunction with human growth hormone occurs.[21] Completion of bone maturation and termination of growth. This occurs indirectly via estradiol metabolites and hence more gradually in men than women. Increased muscle strength and mass, shoulders become broader and rib cage expands, deepening of voice, growth of the Adam's apple. Enlargement of sebaceous glands. This might cause acne, subcutaneous fat in face decreases. Pubic hair extends to thighs and up toward umbilicus, development of facial hair (sideburns, beard, moustache), loss of scalp hair (androgenetic alopecia), increase in chest hair, periareolar hair, perianal hair, leg hair, armpit hair.

True Grit supplements have absolutely nothing to hide. That’s why there are no proprietary blends in any True Grit product. Proprietary blends are used by some brands to hide that they are using underdosed levels of premium ingredients. That’s not what True GritTM is about. True Grit supplements contain premium, fully dosed key ingredients, so you’ll know exactly what is in the supplement you’re putting in your body.
If you’re an older man with low testosterone and interested in taking testosterone, this decision should be carefully considered with your physician. Your physician will be able to better assess the balance of your conditions and whether hormone replacement could put you at potential risk. It's a bad idea for anybody to engage in hormone supplementation without the supervision of a physician. Just because hormones occur naturally in the body does not mean that they can be taken without negative effects.
“What on earth do you mean?” Well, I don’t literally mean taking it to the compound. What I mean to say is that you should be incorporating the three most important compound exercises into your routine: bench press, squats, and deadlifts. In case you didn’t know, by training large muscle groups your body releases more testosterone. When you do these three lifts, and perform them properly, then you’ll reap the benefits of not only muscle gains, but also that of an increased release of testosterone and growth hormone.
The mineral zinc is important for testosterone production, and supplementing your diet for as little as six weeks has been shown to cause a marked improvement in testosterone among men with low levels.1 Likewise, research has shown that restricting dietary sources of zinc leads to a significant decrease in testosterone, while zinc supplementation increases it2 -- and even protects men from exercised-induced reductions in testosterone levels.3
It also has vitamin B6. One study called out folate and vitamins B6 and B12 as important nutrients for athletes to achieve optimal health and performance. Vitamin B6 is commonly found in food, like fortified cereals, and as with magnesium, it’s possible to have too much vitamin B6. The NIH recommends an upper daily limit for adults of 100mg per day. Beast Sports comes well under this limit at 10mg per day, but still well above the minimum recommended dose of 1.7mg needed to see benefits.
A number of epidemiological studies have found that bone mineral density in the aging male population is positively associated with endogenous androgen levels (Murphy et al 1993; Ongphiphadhanakul et al 1995; Rucker et al 2004). Testosterone levels in young men have been shown to correlate with bone size, indicating a role in determination of peak bone mass and protection from future osteoporosis (Lorentzon et al 2005). Male hypogonadism has been shown to be a risk factor for hip fracture (Jackson et al 1992) and a recent study showed a high prevalence of hypogonadism in a group of male patients with average age 75 years presenting with minimal trauma fractures compared to stroke victims who acted as controls (Leifke et al 2005). Estrogen is a well known determinant of bone density in women and some investigators have found serum estrogen to be a strong determinant of male bone density (Khosla et al 1998; Khosla et al 2001). Serum estrogen was also found to correlate better than testosterone with peak bone mass (Khosla et al 2001) but this is in contradiction of a more recent study showing a negative correlation of estrogen with peak bone size (Lorentzon et al 2005). Men with aromatase deficiency (Carani et al 1997) or defunctioning estrogen receptor mutations (Smith et al 1994) have been found to have abnormally low bone density despite normal or high testosterone levels which further emphasizes the important influence of estrogen on male bone density.
For this reason, after the 2008 financial market meltdown, some commentators put the blame for the crash on the male-dominated profession, arguing that men take too many risks, and the economy would do better and be more stable if it was run by women. Of course, risk-taking does come with inherent risk, but it has also been responsible for the lion’s share of society’s progress and innovation since the dawn of time. Financial markets would likely not exist – period – without testosterone-driven risk-taking.
I am generally dubious about supplement claims & have tried a few other Testosterone boosters which had no effect I could tell. Being desperate to find something to help me feel better, I ordered Dr Martin's T Booster. It arrived on May 14th and after the first day I felt better & noticeably had more energy. I don't have that tired dead feeling every morning now when trying to get out of bed. I am able to do some work & physical activities without being exhausted to the point of being sick. I have been taking Dr Martin's T-Booster for 8 days now. While I am not out running marathons yet, I am feeling much better & hope to continue getting better as I keep taking it
2009 had heart attack, placed coronary stent, everything okay. Put on statins to keep lipid levels down to prevent further artery blockage. One year later developed Peyronie’s disease, low sex drive, fatigue, testicles withdrawn and hurting. Testosterone level was 85. Diagnosed with hypogonadism. Started Androgel, felt normal after a couple of weeks. I believe statins is the cause of my low T, you need lipids for hormone transport. Androgel could only bring my T level in the 250 range. Switched to Axiron (better, less messy), and my T level stays around 500 range. I get samples of Testim every now and then, it has a manly woody fragrance that women like. At present, I’m feeling a little fatigue, and mild dehydration. My lab work is always normal, except my red blood cells is always on the high side, almost abnormal. Next week I am going to donate some blood, to bring my RBC count down, and see if that will help.
A large number of trials have demonstrated a positive effect of testosterone treatment on bone mineral density (Katznelson et al 1996; Behre et al 1997; Leifke et al 1998; Snyder et al 2000; Zacharin et al 2003; Wang, Cunningham et al 2004; Aminorroaya et al 2005; Benito et al 2005) and bone architecture (Benito et al 2005). These effects are often more impressive in longer trials, which have shown that adequate replacement will lead to near normal bone density but that the full effects may take two years or more (Snyder et al 2000; Wang, Cunningham et al 2004; Aminorroaya et al 2005). Three randomized placebo-controlled trials of testosterone treatment in aging males have been conducted (Snyder et al 1999; Kenny et al 2001; Amory et al 2004). One of these studies concerned men with a mean age of 71 years with two serum testosterone levels less than 12.1nmol/l. After 36 months of intramuscular testosterone treatment or placebo, there were significant increases in vertebral and hip bone mineral density. In this study, there was also a significant decrease in the bone resorption marker urinary deoxypyridinoline with testosterone treatment (Amory et al 2004). The second study contained men with low bioavailable testosterone levels and an average age of 76 years. Testosterone treatment in the form of transdermal patches was given for 1 year. During this trial there was a significant preservation of hip bone mineral density with testosterone treatment but testosterone had no effect on bone mineral density at other sites including the vertebrae. There were no significant alterations in bone turnover markers during testosterone treatment (Kenny et al 2001). The remaining study contained men of average age 73 years. Men were eligible for the study if their serum total testosterone levels were less than 16.5 nmol/L, meaning that the study contained men who would usually be considered eugonadal. The beneficial effects of testosterone on bone density were confined to the men who had lower serum testosterone levels at baseline and were seen only in the vertebrae. There were no significant changes in bone turnover markers. Testosterone in the trial was given via scrotal patches for a 36 month duration (Snyder et al 1999). A recent meta-analysis of the effects on bone density of testosterone treatment in men included data from these studies and two other randomized controlled trials. The findings were that testosterone produces a significant increase of 2.7% in the bone mineral density at the lumber spine but no overall change at the hip (Isidori et al 2005). These results from randomized controlled trials in aging men show much smaller benefits of testosterone treatment on bone density than have been seen in other trials. This could be due to the trials including patients who are not hypogonadal and being too short to allow for the maximal effects of testosterone. The meta-analysis also assessed the data concerning changes of bone formation and resorption markers during testosterone treatment. There was a significant decrease in bone resorption markers but no change in markers of bone formation suggesting that reduction of bone resorption may be the primary mode of action of testosterone in improving bone density (Isidori et al 2005).
Recently my testosterone level came back at 380. and I am on max dose of 1% 8 pumps per day. The Dr. put me on 1.62% 8 pumps once a day and I will test in a few weeks to see how my level has changed. The issue is I am afraid of is putting 4 pumps a day in each shoulder and upper arm. Has anyone used this much to get there levels up? I am very fit and workout 4 times a week . The other issue is cost because 1.62% is not available 1n generic and cost has skyrocketed.
Get out of here with your quackery nonsense. No one likes trolls that want to push diet and weight loss pills as a serious solution to low t and ED. Anyone who reads your comment will waste at least 20 seconds of their life. What’s worse, they might listen to you instead of getting real medical advice that might actually help with an issue that is devastating to their lifestyle. And btw, before you decide to respond to this with more quackery, testimonials or fake research, know that I am a pharmaceutical scientist and won’t fall for your bogus statements

A large number of trials have demonstrated a positive effect of testosterone treatment on bone mineral density (Katznelson et al 1996; Behre et al 1997; Leifke et al 1998; Snyder et al 2000; Zacharin et al 2003; Wang, Cunningham et al 2004; Aminorroaya et al 2005; Benito et al 2005) and bone architecture (Benito et al 2005). These effects are often more impressive in longer trials, which have shown that adequate replacement will lead to near normal bone density but that the full effects may take two years or more (Snyder et al 2000; Wang, Cunningham et al 2004; Aminorroaya et al 2005). Three randomized placebo-controlled trials of testosterone treatment in aging males have been conducted (Snyder et al 1999; Kenny et al 2001; Amory et al 2004). One of these studies concerned men with a mean age of 71 years with two serum testosterone levels less than 12.1nmol/l. After 36 months of intramuscular testosterone treatment or placebo, there were significant increases in vertebral and hip bone mineral density. In this study, there was also a significant decrease in the bone resorption marker urinary deoxypyridinoline with testosterone treatment (Amory et al 2004). The second study contained men with low bioavailable testosterone levels and an average age of 76 years. Testosterone treatment in the form of transdermal patches was given for 1 year. During this trial there was a significant preservation of hip bone mineral density with testosterone treatment but testosterone had no effect on bone mineral density at other sites including the vertebrae. There were no significant alterations in bone turnover markers during testosterone treatment (Kenny et al 2001). The remaining study contained men of average age 73 years. Men were eligible for the study if their serum total testosterone levels were less than 16.5 nmol/L, meaning that the study contained men who would usually be considered eugonadal. The beneficial effects of testosterone on bone density were confined to the men who had lower serum testosterone levels at baseline and were seen only in the vertebrae. There were no significant changes in bone turnover markers. Testosterone in the trial was given via scrotal patches for a 36 month duration (Snyder et al 1999). A recent meta-analysis of the effects on bone density of testosterone treatment in men included data from these studies and two other randomized controlled trials. The findings were that testosterone produces a significant increase of 2.7% in the bone mineral density at the lumber spine but no overall change at the hip (Isidori et al 2005). These results from randomized controlled trials in aging men show much smaller benefits of testosterone treatment on bone density than have been seen in other trials. This could be due to the trials including patients who are not hypogonadal and being too short to allow for the maximal effects of testosterone. The meta-analysis also assessed the data concerning changes of bone formation and resorption markers during testosterone treatment. There was a significant decrease in bone resorption markers but no change in markers of bone formation suggesting that reduction of bone resorption may be the primary mode of action of testosterone in improving bone density (Isidori et al 2005).


That said, magnesium is one of a few ingredients demonstrated to impact testosterone levels. Researchers at Italy’s University of Palermo found that magnesium improved participants’ anabolic hormone status — including their testosterone levels. In a follow-up study, they confirm that even adjusting for age differences in their participant group, “magnesium was positively associated with total testosterone.” They propose that magnesium supplementation might help improve muscle performance in aging men — a group particularly vulnerable to declining/low testosterone levels. Outside of Italy, researchers at Turkey’s Selçuk University found that magnesium supplementation increased testosterone levels for both athletes and more sedentary men alike.
Mood disturbance and dysthymia are part of the clinical syndrome of hypogonadism. Epidemiological studies have found a positive association between testosterone levels and mood, and depressed aging males have lower testosterone levels than controls (Barrett-Connor, Von Muhlen et al 1999). Furthermore, induction of a hypogonadal state during treatment of men for prostate cancer leads to an increase in depression scores (Almeida et al 2004). Trials of testosterone treatment effects on mood have varied in outcome. Data on the effects on men with depression are conflicting (Seidman et al 2001; Pope et al 2003) but there is evidence that testosterone treatment of older hypogonadal men does result in improvements in mood (Wang et al 1996) and that this may occur through changes in regional brain perfusion (Azad et al 2003).
I am 51 male. I have had low T for a few years now. I was using Testim for a few years, but I hated the smell and mostly feared getting thus stuff on the kids. The reason I stopped with all that nasty gel is because my T levels weren’t improving. So, why bother using anything that is not working, so I stopped. Apparently I am one of those men who do not absorb the gel very well. My T levels dropped from a low of around 200 on a 800+ scale to under 100 after I stopped using the gel.

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I have been on TRT for over 8 years now. I feel GREAT! I read all these studies, hear in the news, and see all these dumb lawsuit commercials about testosterone causing cardiovascular events, blood clots and many other things. If anyone takes the time to do the due diligence and read the studies the picture becomes very clear. Unless you monitor all the other hormones, specifically, Estradiol, DHT, Pregenolone, Total Testosterone, Free Direct Testosterone, and DHEAS you are playing a deadly game. The reason is you must give something to control the pathways of T conversion into estradiol and or DHT. The vast majority of the studies used nothing to control those pathways and they gave men way, way more T than they needed to start with. They also gave forms of T that are not acceptable. Especially the oral version.
Vitamin D3: Vitamin D3 is actually more hormone than it is a vitamin. Vitamin D is taken in by around 10% of our diets and D3 is mostly absorbed from the sun, which can be linked to greater testosterone production. The link between the two is a result from the luteinizing hormone playing its role. Read more about how vitamin D3 effects testosterone — the evidence is staggering.

There are several supplements on the market claiming to be natural testosterone boosters. I get these sorts of things in the mail all time. The companies that produce these products claim that the herbs (typically stinging nettle and tribulus) in their pills increase free testosterone by reducing SHBG. They also throw in some B vitamins for “increased energy and vitality.”


Fatherhood decreases testosterone levels in men, suggesting that the emotions and behavior tied to decreased testosterone promote paternal care. In humans and other species that utilize allomaternal care, paternal investment in offspring is beneficial to said offspring's survival because it allows the parental dyad to raise multiple children simultaneously. This increases the reproductive fitness of the parents, because their offspring are more likely to survive and reproduce. Paternal care increases offspring survival due to increased access to higher quality food and reduced physical and immunological threats.[60] This is particularly beneficial for humans since offspring are dependent on parents for extended periods of time and mothers have relatively short inter-birth intervals.[61] While extent of paternal care varies between cultures, higher investment in direct child care has been seen to be correlated with lower average testosterone levels as well as temporary fluctuations.[62] For instance, fluctuation in testosterone levels when a child is in distress has been found to be indicative of fathering styles. If a father's testosterone levels decrease in response to hearing their baby cry, it is an indication of empathizing with the baby. This is associated with increased nurturing behavior and better outcomes for the infant.[63]
Now that we know chronic insulin spikes lead to lower Testosterone production, I hope I haven’t sent you running into the low carb camp! There are a few studies out there showing that long term low carb or ketogenic dieting leads to higher cortisol levels (especially with subjects who are training), and decreased testosterone levels (28 & 29). I have used low carb diets in the past with successful results (winning a national bodybuilding title), however the key is to use cyclical carb re-feeds. If you’re going to go on a low carb diet for whatever reason, be sure to work in a large carb reefed once a week.
NHT works to reach a targeted level of hormones in your body, restoring your body’s natural ability to keep healthy and fit. Hormones are beneficial at any age, but most commonly we administer the therapy to people in their 40’s, when your body naturally begins to slow production of certain hormones. Supplementing these declining hormones can keep your body fit and active for much longer. Bio-identical hormones are made from plants and are identical to the hormones naturally produced by your own body. We never use synthetic hormones, which have been shown to increase your risk of heart disease and diabetes.

Felt I was more sluggish than I should be,Went on TRT ’cause my bloodwork said I fell in the parameters for hormone therapy. When i started felt I was 17, (I was 50))I did everything possible and passed for type A, and physiologically, things seem to heal faster. But I missed memories, now that I was speeded-up I no longer could easily connect and be a part of them.
Testosterone, historically believed to be important only for male sexual function, has over the past decades transformed from niche hormone to multi-system player.22 There is increasing recognition of the harmful consequences of hypogonadism (also known as testosterone deficiency) wide spectrum of beneficial health effects of testosterone therapy and.23, 24

i have been on T therapy for 32 years now after being diagnosed with Klinefelters. Recently my pharmacy had been non responsive to my request to refill and they flat out refused/declined the request from my doctor which was T powder mixed with a cream base that you place on the shoulder. I asked if I could purchase it with cash and they told me that the FDA is not approving this usage anymore but did not provide an option. Completely out now for close to a week and have been working for five weeks trying to get again. Now what to do, I’m having all kinds of weird feelings including anxiety to the max, nervous, irritable, muscle cramps/pains … I guess they just don’t care that we cannot get something our bodies have adjusted too for many years. Strange thing is I think I have found a compounding pharmacy in Houston Texas that will fill this Rx. I’m not sure how one can do this and another cannot especially if they have compounding capabilities. Now I’m wondering if I can get thru this and stop taking it alltogether however I already know I’m seeing signs of being forgetful, lack of energy and foggy brain. I wonder if this will ever stop. The really bad thing is that I’m traveling for work and cannot get into my doctor’s office. This whole process is not great. I can only imagine what a person must feel taking hard drugs then not getting any all at once.

A notable study out of Wayne State University in Indiana found that older men who had a mild zinc deficiency significantly increased their testosterone from 8.3 to 16.0 nmol/L—a 93 percent increase—following six months of zinc supplementation. Researchers of the study concluded that zinc may play an important role in modulating serum testosterone levels in normal healthy men.6
First, it’s important to note that these tactics and practices to boost testosterone naturally probably won’t work with men who have hypoandrogenism. If the glands and cells responsible for producing testosterone are damaged or defective, no amount of eggs or sleep will help you raise testosterone levels. You’ll likely need to use testosterone replacement therapy to get your T levels to a healthy place.
Discussing the clinical utility of these findings, Dr. Budoff told EndocrineWeb, “in the short-term, I am going to check my patients for atherosclerosis before instituting testosterone therapy. We still need a definitive study to show whether or not heart attacks are increased by supplemental testosterone, but advancing atherosclerosis is not a good thing. These results should make us more cautious about whom we treat and what doses we use.”
Some studies have looked at testosterone therapy and cognition. Although the findings weren’t definitive, there was some evidence of cognitive improvement. Other studies have shown that it improves mood. Testosterone therapy has also been shown to be effective in the treatment of osteoporosis and in increasing muscle bulk and strength. [See “Testosterone’s impact on brain, bone, and muscle,” above.]
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The testicles produce an enzyme called 11ßHSD-1 which protects your testosterone molecules from the effects cortisol.  During times of prolonged stress and chronically elevated cortisol, there simply is too much cortisol for 11ßHSD-1 to handle.  This results in testosterone molecules being destroyed inside the gonads before they even enter the bloodstream (8, 9).
Testosterone levels peak by early adulthood and drop as you age—about 1% to 2% a year beginning in the 40s. As men reach their 50s and beyond, this may lead to signs and symptoms, such as impotence or changes in sexual desire, depression or anxiety, reduced muscle mass, less energy, weight gain, anemia, and hot flashes. While falling testosterone levels are a normal part of aging, certain conditions can hasten the decline. These include:
Testosterone boosters are a class of herbal supplements aimed at naturally increasing your testosterone levels. Usually, they contain micronutrients that men are commonly deficient in, such as zinc, and which have been connected in research to healthy testosterone levels. They also may contain adaptogens, which are a class of supplement that are thought to help the body adapt to stress, or ingredients which have been connected to improved sleep. Sleep restriction has been shown to reduce testosterone in healthy young men, and as Chris Lockwood, Ph.D., notes, disturbed sleep is a common symptom of low T-levels.[1]
AC, I just ran across the thread… definitely start the injections. Should help with levels that low. I’m 36 and have battled low T for 6-7 years. My labs came back to show 90ng/dl when I just turned 30, and I’ve done Testosterone cypionate injections @ 100mg/mL weekly, Testim, Androgel, and Fortesta over the years. I’m actually going to my endocrinologist tomorrow to have new blood work done.
I am sorry but if you are a doctor you really are making it obvious that it’s possible for doctors to know nothing about this problem.What kind of Doctor are you? Or did you get a doctorate in some obscure field? Are you a reverend doctor by chance? I think for the sake of people who need this help you should quit talking out your ass .I won’t say you are wrong.You have already proved you don’t know anything useful about HRT and I doubt you are a doctor.
You may be interested in boosting your testosterone levels if your doctor says you have low levels, or hypogonadism, or need testosterone replacement therapy for other conditions. If you have normal testosterone levels, increasing your testosterone levels may not give any additional benefits. The increased benefits mentioned below have only been researched in people with low testosterone levels.
Cardiovascular disease, and its underlying pathological process atherosclerosis, is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in the developed and developing world. Coronary heart disease in particular is the commonest cause of death worldwide (AHA 2002; MacKay and Mensah 2004). As well as increasing with age, this disease is more common in the male versus female population internationally, which has led to interest in the potential role of sex hormones in modulating risk of development of atherosclerosis. Concerns about the potential adverse effects of testosterone treatment on cardiovascular disease have previously contributed to caution in prescribing testosterone to those who have, or who are at risk of, cardiovascular disease. Contrary to fears of the potential adverse effects of testosterone on cardiovascular disease, there are over forty epidemiological studies which have examined the relationship of testosterone levels to the presence or development of coronary heart disease, and none have shown a positive correlation. Many of these studies have found the presence of coronary heart disease to be associated with low testosterone levels (Reviews: Jones, Jones et al 2003; Jones et al 2005).
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