Herbalists have used _Trifolium pratense_, red clover, to treat menopausal symptoms like hot flashes. The mechanisms underlying these effects remain unknown. Testosterone decreases hot flashes in some postmenopausal women, so red clover may work in this way. A 2015 paper in the Avicenna Journal of Phytomedicine reviewed the literature testing this idea.
Testosterone booster products obtained from trusted sources and administered as per the recommendations of the manufacturer may still present some health risks. The present case provided weak evidence of causality between acute liver injury and a commercial testosterone booster. To guarantee an optimal outcome with no severe side effects, further research is warranted to confirm the present findings and determine whether the effects observed in this case report would be statistically significant in larger samples.
“I can't tell you how good the product is! I'm in the best shape of my life. I used to take blood pressure medication and I don't even take that anymore. It's changed every aspect of my life. I was a 40 waist and I'm down to a 36. I'm 54 years old, and people tell me I look better than I ever have, and I look like I'm in my early 40s! And I'm telling you it's the Andro. This product is so much better than even the advertisements! From taking Andro400 I immediately notice a burst of energy . . . and my skin color, my sexual advancements, my energy, plus the weight loss, the toning of the body, and the increase strength and endurance . . . it's like night and day where I was then and where I am now, and Andro400 has made the difference. And my wife also takes it, 1 pill every other day, and she has experienced an amazing transformation in her body alone, with her hair, her complexion, and as well as in the gym. It's an outstanding product. My customers, my friends, my family, everybody is noticing the difference!”
Some studies have looked at testosterone therapy and cognition. Although the findings weren’t definitive, there was some evidence of cognitive improvement. Other studies have shown that it improves mood. Testosterone therapy has also been shown to be effective in the treatment of osteoporosis and in increasing muscle bulk and strength. [See “Testosterone’s impact on brain, bone, and muscle,” above.]
If low T is your initial concern, lifestyle changes may help. “Dietary and exercise changes, particularly limiting sugars, especially fructose, eating healthy saturated fats, and engaging in high-intensity exercises may relieve symptoms of low testosterone," Lucille says. "Strength training, reducing stress, and optimizing vitamin D levels can also be very effective at boosting testosterone levels naturally."

If you are serious about losing weight, you have got to strictly limit the amount of processed sugar in your diet, as evidence is mounting that excess sugar, and fructose in particular, is the primary driving factor in the obesity epidemic. So cutting soda from your diet is essential, as is limiting fructose found in processed foods, fruit juice, excessive fruit and so-called "healthy" sweeteners like agave.


Herein lies the problem.  DHT is an extremely powerful androgen, significantly more potent than testosterone.  Somehow, fenugreek causes increases in muscle mass and libido while reducing DHT.  I often argue on the site that it is not exactly increased testosterone that you want.  You want the blessings of a high testosterone level: physical fitness, libido, and high energy levels.  If fenugreek can bestow these upon you, why do you need the testosterone?
While researchers in Brisbane, Australia, found that while Testofen (“a standardized [fenugreek] extract and mineral formulation”) significantly improved the sexual arousal, orgasm, and the general quality of life of participants, it did not remarkably increase testosterone above normal levels. Participants who took Testofen were more satisfied with their energy, well-being, and muscle strength than those who took the placebo.
I request that my full name not be released. Ron will do. I am 81 years old and am not after a hot time in the sack, although I don’t pass up opportunity. Patches, gel and spray did not do much for my disposition, energy or overall sense of well being. 14 pellets every 3 to 4 months have made a world of difference. It is a bit painful but worth it as long as it helps. My Primary Dr. did have me state that I would not seek treatment for prostate cancer when I declined a biopsy. I pay for the pellets and at my age see no need for Medicare to pay for questionable tests.
Cognitive abilities differ between males and females and these differences are present from childhood. In broad terms, girls have stronger verbal skills than boys who tend to have stronger skills related to spatial ability (Linn and Petersen 1985). It is thought that the actions of sex hormones have a role in these differences. Reviewing different cognitive strengths of male versus female humans is not within the scope of this article but the idea that cognition could be altered by testosterone deserves attention.
Clinical trials of the effect of testosterone on glucose metabolism in men have occurred in diabetic and non-diabetic populations. Data specific to aging males is not available. A series of studies investigated the effects of testosterone or dihydrotestosterone given for 6 weeks or 3 months to middle aged, non-diabetic obese men (Marin, Holmang et al 1992; Marin, Krotkiewski et al 1992; Marin et al 1993). It was found that physiological treatment doses led to improved insulin resistance, as measured by the gold standard technique using a euglycemic clamp and/or serum glucose and insulin responses during glucose tolerance test. These improvements were associated with decreased central obesity, measured by computered tomography (CT) or waist-hip ratio, without reduced total fat mass. Insulin resistance improved more with testosterone than dihydrotestosterone treatment and beneficial effects were greater in men with lower baseline testosterone levels. Increasing testosterone levels into the supraphysiological range lead to decreased glucose tolerance.
However, if you have normal testosterone levels and are looking for a boost, for strength gaining purposes, then D-Aspartic acid use may prove less fruitful. A study published in Nutrition Research showed that when the booster was given to men who resistance trained four times a week, their body composition and muscle strength was no different to men who took part in resistance training without the aid of D-Aspartic acid.
My energy level have increased and my muscle mass has also increased, so I have positive results. As I said before I didn’t have a problem with achieving erections or maintaining, but with these injections I am now getting quite a good deal more spontaneous erections, and then when I do get one it does feels harder and stronger. The stronger and harder aspect is great, but the more often spontaneous is a bit annoying. 🙂
Some of the effects of testosterone treatment are well recognised and it seems clear that testosterone treatment for aging hypogonadal men can be expected to increase lean body mass, decrease visceral fat mass, increase bone mineral density and decrease total cholesterol. Beneficial effects have been seen in many trials on other parameters such as glycemic control in diabetes, erectile dysfunction, cardiovascular risk factors, angina, mood and cognition. These potentially important effects require confirmation in larger clinical trials. Indeed, it is apparent that longer duration randomized controlled trials of testosterone treatment in large numbers of men are needed to confirm the effects of testosterone on many aspects of aging male health including cardiovascular health, psychiatric health, prostate cancer and functional capacity. In the absence of such studies, it is necessary to balance risk and benefit on the best available data. At the present time the data supports the treatment of hypogonadal men with testosterone to normalize testosterone levels and improve symptoms. Most men with hypogonadism do not have a contraindication to treatment, but it is important to monitor for adverse consequences including prostate complications and polycythemia.
Jeff- I read your post and I can relate to your problem. Perhaps you’ve already received some help but I can tell you this much. I recovered from prostate cancer about 2 yrs ago. My oncologist is also a graduate of Harvard like the doc that wrote this article. He put me on Axiron about 8 months ago after I complained to him of symptoms similar to you. He has no concerns that the T will cause me to get prostate cancer again. I do my 4 month check ups and have my T tested at that time along with my PSA. Everything is normal so far. My T count was initially 50 and now I am in the low 300 range. The Axiron has gotten me back to normal and then some!! I’m 58 and I told him at my last appt that I feel like I’m 40.
To get your levels into the healthy range, sun exposure is the BEST way to optimize your vitamin D levels; exposing a large amount of your skin until it turns the lightest shade of pink, as near to solar noon as possible, is typically necessary to achieve adequate vitamin D production. If sun exposure is not an option, a safe tanning bed (with electronic ballasts rather than magnetic ballasts, to avoid unnecessary exposure to EMF fields) can be used.

Testosterone replacement therapy is currently only FDA approved for men who have been diagnosed with hypogonadism, but it’s also prescribed off-label for older men who take it in hopes that it will improve their libido. The use of testosterone therapy is increasingly common in the United States, with more than 2 million men receiving the therapy. Not every man benefits from taking testosterone supplements. Testosterone is available in different forms, including topicals such as gels, creams, and patches; injections; and pellets that are surgically placed directly beneath the skin. (7)

×