Low Testosterone has a big impact on men. Some males suffer debilitating symptoms when their bodies produce insufficient levels of testosterone, resulting in a condition called hypogonadism. Hypogonadism is the decreased functionality of the testes in producing an adequate amount of testosterone. Hypogonadism is not permanent, and can be treated with hormone replacement therapy, specifically Low Testosterone Therapy.
Now, many men bypass the natty test booster category altogether, head straight for designer anabolic steroids, and start injecting testosterone (among other things). And, while exogenous testosterone administration will always trump the effects of natural testosterone boosters, that instant gratification does not come without a long, dreadful list of unwanted consequences.
Glad to be heard. I have been using 10 times the recommended prescription dose of injectable test over the course of 6 years. Yes, 10 times the recommended dose. I use 250 at the lowest and 1000 mgs a week and sometimes 1200 mgs weekly. I am 50 years old. I look better than 90% of the 25 year olds I see in the gym. I have had zero issues. Acne a little , testicle shrinkage maybe 15%. No big deal. My sex drive is on fire. I bench pressed 340 pound today. I weigh 195 pounds and lean and muscles defined and hard as a rock. Doctors in the USA have no clue what they are doing. They read literature and have no experience or facts about test. They prescribe 50 mgs a week. Way short of what we as men need. Everyone is different, but 250mgs weekly is what we need typically. Injectable is the way to go. Gels are a weak joke. My doctor basically told me he was scared to prescribe more than 50 mgs weekly for fear of being sued if something went wrong. I found my own source and have been on top of the world for 6 years. Father died of prostate cancer. Mine prostate is fine. Prostate cancer from test is another example of ignorance in medical field. I am living proof that one can inject 10 times the recommended rate for the better part of a decade with no probs. I do hope the medical field catches up with the times and stops relying on archaic info.
Always worry of side effects i.e. prostate cancer! Also feels like I am doping like a pro-cyclist (hate cheaters) Without it my muscles and joints stiffens so painfully, fuzzy and somewhat depressed, when pushing very hard while exercising the sensations become bizarre and again so incredibly painful — it feels so good after the injection if I had waited too long!
Why do we need magnesium? Magnesium is an essential nutrient in the body that can help decrease the risk of developing osteoporosis, improve insulin sensitivity, and lower the risk of hypertension. This article looks at other health benefits of magnesium, what happens if a person has a deficiency, supplements, and how to include it in the diet. Read now
Glad to be heard. I have been using 10 times the recommended prescription dose of injectable test over the course of 6 years. Yes, 10 times the recommended dose. I use 250 at the lowest and 1000 mgs a week and sometimes 1200 mgs weekly. I am 50 years old. I look better than 90% of the 25 year olds I see in the gym. I have had zero issues. Acne a little , testicle shrinkage maybe 15%. No big deal. My sex drive is on fire. I bench pressed 340 pound today. I weigh 195 pounds and lean and muscles defined and hard as a rock. Doctors in the USA have no clue what they are doing. They read literature and have no experience or facts about test. They prescribe 50 mgs a week. Way short of what we as men need. Everyone is different, but 250mgs weekly is what we need typically. Injectable is the way to go. Gels are a weak joke. My doctor basically told me he was scared to prescribe more than 50 mgs weekly for fear of being sued if something went wrong. I found my own source and have been on top of the world for 6 years. Father died of prostate cancer. Mine prostate is fine. Prostate cancer from test is another example of ignorance in medical field. I am living proof that one can inject 10 times the recommended rate for the better part of a decade with no probs. I do hope the medical field catches up with the times and stops relying on archaic info.
Cholesterol is the building block of testosterone, and eating healthy fats, including saturated fats, helps your body make “good” cholesterol while also supporting healthy hormone balance. Give your body a dose of healthy fats and proteins by consuming moderate amounts of meats from hormone-free animals, grassfed cattle, and wild-caught fish. Nosh on healthy-fat sources such as olives, nuts, seeds, avocados, and coconut oil.
A number of epidemiological studies have found that bone mineral density in the aging male population is positively associated with endogenous androgen levels (Murphy et al 1993; Ongphiphadhanakul et al 1995; Rucker et al 2004). Testosterone levels in young men have been shown to correlate with bone size, indicating a role in determination of peak bone mass and protection from future osteoporosis (Lorentzon et al 2005). Male hypogonadism has been shown to be a risk factor for hip fracture (Jackson et al 1992) and a recent study showed a high prevalence of hypogonadism in a group of male patients with average age 75 years presenting with minimal trauma fractures compared to stroke victims who acted as controls (Leifke et al 2005). Estrogen is a well known determinant of bone density in women and some investigators have found serum estrogen to be a strong determinant of male bone density (Khosla et al 1998; Khosla et al 2001). Serum estrogen was also found to correlate better than testosterone with peak bone mass (Khosla et al 2001) but this is in contradiction of a more recent study showing a negative correlation of estrogen with peak bone size (Lorentzon et al 2005). Men with aromatase deficiency (Carani et al 1997) or defunctioning estrogen receptor mutations (Smith et al 1994) have been found to have abnormally low bone density despite normal or high testosterone levels which further emphasizes the important influence of estrogen on male bone density.
Trials of testosterone treatment in men with type 2 diabetes have also taken place. A recent randomized controlled crossover trial assessed the effects of intramuscular testosterone replacement to achieve levels within the physiological range, compared with placebo injections in 24 men with diabetes, hypogonadism and a mean age of 64 years (Kapoor et al 2006). Ten of these men were insulin treated. Testosterone treatment led to a significant reduction in glycated hemoglobin (HbA1C) and fasting glucose compared to placebo. Testosterone also produced a significant reduction in insulin resistance, measured by the homeostatic model assessment (HOMA), in the fourteen non-insulin treated patients. It is not possible to measure insulin resistance in patients treated with insulin but five out of ten of these patients had a reduction of insulin dose during the study. Other significant changes during testosterone treatment in this trial were reduced total cholesterol, waist circumference and waist-hip ratio. Similarly, a placebo-controlled but non-blinded trial in 24 men with visceral obesity, diabetes, hypogonadism and mean age 57 years found that three months of oral testosterone treatment led to significant reductions in HbA1C, fasting glucose, post-prandial glucose, weight, fat mass and waist-hip ratio (Boyanov et al 2003). In contrast, an uncontrolled study of 150 mg intramuscular testosterone given to 10 patients, average age 64 years, with diabetes and hypogonadism found no significant change in diabetes control, fasting glucose or insulin levels (Corrales et al 2004). Another uncontrolled study showed no beneficial effect of testosterone treatment on insulin resistance, measured by HOMA and ‘minimal model’ of area under acute insulin response curves, in 11 patients with type 2 diabetes aged between 33 and 73 years (Lee et al 2005). Body mass index was within the normal range in this population and there was no change in waist-hip ratio or weight during testosterone treatment. Baseline testosterone levels were in the low-normal range and patients received a relatively small dose of 100 mg intramuscular testosterone every three weeks. A good increase in testosterone levels during the trial is described but it is not stated at which time during the three week cycle the testosterone levels were tested, so the lack of response could reflect an insufficient overall testosterone dose in the trial period.

A: There are no over-the-counter products approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to increase testosterone levels. There are several prescription medication options available. Please consult with your health care provider in regards to your testosterone levels and to determine which treatment option best meets your individual needs. For more specific information, consult with your doctor or pharmacist for guidance based on your health status and current medications, particularly before taking any action. Kristen Dore, PharmD


Testosterone levels generally peak during adolescence and early adulthood. As you get older, your testosterone level gradually declines — typically about 1 percent a year after age 30 or 40. It is important to determine in older men if a low testosterone level is simply due to the decline of normal aging or if it is due to a disease (hypogonadism).
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