Everytime you add Testosterone to your system, be it naturally through producing in the testis, injected, oral, or dermal you will receive a spike in your blood levels. Estrogen is mainly created in men by an action of an enzyme called Aromatase. Aromatase floats around and binds to Testosterone and converts it to Estrogen. When you spike your T your E will follow in this way. The obvious and detrimental effects to many of the already estrogen dominant hypogonadal men will be inappropriate over stimulation of the estrogen receptors in the body. Gynecomastia, fluid retention, weight gain, brain fog, erratic emotions, depression, ect. Higher levels of Estrogen cause SHBG to be created. SHBG binds to Testosterone and transports it to the liver for disposal. On top of this Estrogen can bind to your androgen receptors causing Testosterone to float around with no where to go. If you are taking shots or gel or cream and feel little to no effect even though it’s technically raised your T blood ranges, you now have an multiple answers for why you little to nothing or feel even worse. This has been known for years that you must be prepared to control Estrogen. An Aromatase Inhibitor (AI) or anti estrogen medication (Clomiphene, Tamoxifen) is needed to stop the estrogen from getting out of control. By taking an Aromatase inhibitor and monitoring your E2 levels you can easily control Estrogen, Aromatase, and SHBG from getting out of hand and free up those blocked androgen receptors so you can now reap the benefits of elevating T to a healthy level. If your Doctor is not testing your E2(aka Estrogen, Estradiol) levels before and during talks and administration of TRT or will never prescribe an AI then you shouldn’t be following his advice at all and will be harmed by Testosterone usage. This may sound complicated but in the end it’s simple. Elevate Testosterone. Control Estrogen. Only two medications needed. Don’t settle.


I’m a low key,thinker-type, after a test I learned my T hormone was so low I should be rigid. TRT sent my drive into negative overdrive: ambition, cunning, entrepreneurial risk, physcal and psychological risks: drugs,you name it. I was lucky it happened after 50 years of memories ’cause I missd and have problems recalling the last seven years that I was on TRT (5 pumps a day of 1.25mgs). If you’re starting, take a pictoral record at the least of your monthly life ( a flick a month).

Studies have demonstrated reduced testosterone levels in men with heart failure as well as other endocrine changes (Tappler and Katz 1979; Kontoleon et al 2003). Treatment of cardiac failure with chronic mechanical circulatory support normalizes many of these changes, including testosterone levels (Noirhomme et al 1999). More recently, two double-blind randomized controlled trials of testosterone treatment for men with low or low-normal serum testosterone levels and heart failure have shown improvements in exercise capacity and symptoms (Pugh et al 2004; Malkin et al 2006). The mechanism of these benefits is currently unclear, although a study of the acute effects of buccal testosterone given to men with chronic cardiac failure under invasive monitoring showed that testosterone increased cardiac index and reduced systemic vascular resistance (Pugh et al 2003). Testosterone may prove useful in the management of cardiac failure but further research is needed.
TestRX is a relative newcomer to the testosterone booster supplement market but don’t write it off because of that. We like the broad range of quality ingredients that appear to be thoughtfully selected to deal head on with the range of symptoms resulting from Low T. The following TestRX review will look at this formula closely and give you the facts! READ THE REVIEW
But can testosterone replacement therapy help with heart disease? Study results are mixed. Small studies in the early 2000s found that men with heart disease who underwent testosterone therapy saw only slight improvements. Some were able to increase their walking distance by 33 percent. Another study found that hormone therapy only widened healthy arteries but had no effect on angina pain.

“I'm having great results. Everybody is seeing a difference. People say, “You look good! Did you lose weight? What are you taking?” I'm 59, and I'm bringing my belt down a couple different notches. I couldn't break 180 lbs for nothing, no matter what I tried. Now it's 175 lbs. and she's going from there. I was just doing it for the belly -- no matter what I just couldn't get rid of the belly (until now). And I'm not as tired as I used to be.“
In summary it’s important to know that this topic is still hotly debated, and there are a lot of inconsistencies in the data. We do know that soy contains phytoestrogens and does seem to have a lot of affects on the body, including some studies that show decreased Testosterone levels. For that reason (and the fact that it tastes like ass) I avoid it, and I recommend you also avoid it (in particular soy isolates!) if you’re seeking higher testosterone.
In fact, studies on vegetarian and low-fat diets both show reduced testosterone levels of about 12 percent. Where higher fat diets of at least 40 percent of calories, with a higher intake of saturated fat, show increased testosterone levels. Why? It’s not rocket science. After all, cholesterol makes up the building blocks from which testosterone is formed; without it, the hormone simply can’t synthesize. Organic eggs are one of the best dietary sources. In addition to essential fatty acids, a whole egg is rich in aspartic acid, an amino acid that triggers production of testosterone.

The largest amounts of testosterone (>95%) are produced by the testes in men,[2] while the adrenal glands account for most of the remainder. Testosterone is also synthesized in far smaller total quantities in women by the adrenal glands, thecal cells of the ovaries, and, during pregnancy, by the placenta.[130] In the testes, testosterone is produced by the Leydig cells.[131] The male generative glands also contain Sertoli cells, which require testosterone for spermatogenesis. Like most hormones, testosterone is supplied to target tissues in the blood where much of it is transported bound to a specific plasma protein, sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG).


Hypogonadism is a disease in which the body is unable to produce normal amounts of testosterone due to a problem with the testicles or with the pituitary gland that controls the testicles. Testosterone replacement therapy can improve the signs and symptoms of low testosterone in these men. Doctors may prescribe testosterone as injections, pellets, patches or gels.
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