I’m a 49yr old who had a testosterone level of below 300 . I have been on AndroGel for over one year now. The first three months my levels were running between 500 and 600.in the fourth month my level spiked to over 1200 and cut my doctor cut my dosage back to half. my levels fell back to below normal and have since remained that way even though I have been put on the normal dosage again. It seems as though my body has stopped responding to the andro gel.
A couple years ago I was having a problem with my thighs burning when walking up stairs. I noticed the muscles in my legs looking smaller. So I had my doc to check my T levels , and it was under 100. So she started me on testosterone injections weekly 200mg . After several injections I felt great , muscles in legs came back , lots of energy everything good . Leveled out at 3 injections a week 100mg , had a T level of 550 . So I go in for my scheduled injection and they tell me there out of testosterone . I might mention, this is a health care facilility that gives financial assistant if needed. And they have 3 or doctors and a nurse practitioner, which was who I was seeing . So I went on to check back often and got the same reply , were out of supply . So finally after months of the same , I gave up . I started loosing wait and my nerves got bad . Was having panic attacks etc. but I was coming off Prozac at the same time so I blamed it all on that. I was so bad with my nerves I ended up in the ER while on vacation . Doc there put me on a med for stress which I’m still using . After close to a year I checked back with the place I was getting TRT and they were resupplyed with testosterone. So I started back up because of low sex drive and ED. My first injection of 200mg was just short of a Marical , nerves felt great ED gone , had a sex drive , lot of energy . Then after 7 days or so all gone bad nerves started back up . He had me scheduled for anouther injection in 4 weeks 100mg . I went in for injection and after a couple days started feeling a little better . Then same thing as before about 7 days later nerves and everything else as before got worse . 3 weeks later I finally got a appt. with this different doc then I use to have . Told him the problems I was having , which included a horrible down mood , no energy . He decided to start injections every 2 weeks and upped the dose slitley. It’s been 5 days and already noticing ED problem reaccuring . He’s worried about the threat of prostate cancer. And doesn’t want to add any more injection to the schedule. I guess I’m going to have to start seeing the nurse practitioner who seemed to be more liberal and informed about TRT. I feel once a week injection is what it will take to get feeling good again. I’m 57 now with good health . Just need to get my T level on track with a doctor that will listen to how his patient is feeling . My last T level was at 365 . I failed to mention before I started the injections I was on androgel Dailey , 5 pumps a day . Then he gave me the injection of 200mg test . That’s when I felt fantastic for about a week or so . Then down hill . And I wanted to switch because the injection just seem so much better and they are . I noticed a big difference.
Sharma, R., Oni, O. A., Gupta, K., Chen, G., Sharma, M., Dawn, B., … & Barua, R. S. (2015, August 6). Normalization of testosterone level is associated with reduced incidence of myocardial infarction. European Heart Journal, 36(40), 2706-2715. Retrieved from https://academic.oup.com/eurheartj/article/36/40/2706/2293361/Normalization-of-testosterone-level-is-associated
There is a negative correlation of testosterone levels with plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) (Glueck et al 1993; Phillips 1993), which is a major prothrombotic factor and known to be associated with progression of atherosclerosis, as well as other prothrombotic factors fibrinogen, α2-antiplasmin and factor VII (Bonithon-Kopp et al 1988; Glueck et al 1993; Phillips 1993; De Pergola et al 1997). There is a positive correlation with tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) which is one of the major fibrinolytic agents (Glueck et al 1993). Interventional trials have shown a neutral effect of physiological testosterone replacement on the major clotting factors (Smith et al 2005) but supraphysiological androgen administration can produce a temporary mild pro-coagulant effect (Anderson et al 1995).
If you have low testosterone and are prescribed testosterone therapy by your doctor, it does not increase your risk for getting prostate cancer. However, in some patients with existing prostate cancer, adding testosterone hormone therapy can make the cancer grow faster. Men with low testosterone levels are actually more likely to get prostate cancer than men with normal prostate levels. You need to discuss these details with your physician and make the best decision for you.
Saw palmetto and testosterone facts Testosterone is the primary male sex hormone. Boosting its levels can have many effects, such as promoting muscle growth and improving libido. Saw palmetto, a plant resembling the leaves of a palm tree, may boost testosterone levels and offer other health benefits. Learn more about saw palmetto and testosterone here. Read now
There are pills in the United States for testosterone supplementation, but their use is strongly discouraged because they cause significant liver toxicity. A safe oral formulation called testosterone undecanoate is available in Canada and in Europe, but not in the United States. What’s quite exciting is that an injectable version of testosterone undecanoate (Nebido) was submitted to the FDA for approval in August 2007. (It’s already approved in many other countries.) It lasts for 12 weeks, so a patient could come in and get a shot about four times a year. [Editor’s note: In December 2009, the brand name of the drug in the United States was changed to Aveed. As of January 2011, it was still awaiting FDA approval.]
High levels of testosterone in the bloodstream lead to increased energy and aggressiveness. The latter pertains to one’s sense of motivation to train harder to achieve optimum muscle growth. Increased aggressiveness or motivation during a workout due to the intake of testosterone boosters guarantees faster progress to beginners as well as professional athletes and bodybuilders.
Sergeant Steel ran into trouble here because it contains Shilajit — a type of plant-based resin. Shilajit is banned in Canada because the Canadian government found heavy metal levels when investigating the ingredient. Shilajit is hard to find, and sensitive to water and variations in temperature, so most manufacturers mix it with additives to make it more stable. Research at Boston University School of Medicine found that “nearly 21 percent of 193 ayurvedic herbal supplements [...] contained lead, mercury or arsenic,” and included shilajit on the list of contaminated ingredients. Even though Sergeant Steel lists its shilajit is “purified,” it doesn’t offer any third-party testing to confirm whether or not their shilajit contains heavy metals, and so we cut it.

Bottom line: testosterone boosters aren’t right for a lot of people. We dive deep into ingredient research below, but typically, testosterone boosters contain at least one (and often three or more) different ingredients that each impact your circulatory system — both the heart and blood. If you’re taking any kind of blood-thinner medication, or you have a history of heart disease, these supplements can get really dangerous, really quickly. The simple fact of the matter is that hormones are tricky things to mess with, and a doctor should be your first port of call to help you safely achieve your goals — whether they’re related to fitness, weight, or libido.
I can report that I saw decreased body fat during my three-month testosterone experiment. I started off with 18% body fat and ended the experiment with 12% body fat. I almost have a six-pack! This is the leanest I’ve ever been in my entire life. The funny thing is, I wasn’t even trying to shed body fat. It just happened. All hail, mighty testosterone!

Testosterone is well known as the most critical anabolic, not to mention androgenic, hormone in the body. It’s what separates the men from the boys. Healthy testosterone levels are critical for guys who want to build muscle mass, boost strength, and drop body fat. Testosterone also supports sexual health and gives a competitive edge. It’s truly the alpha hormone.


This paper will aim to review the current evidence of clinical effects of testosterone treatment within an aging male population. As with any other clinical intervention a decision to treat patients with testosterone requires a balance of risk versus benefit. We shall try to facilitate this by examining the effects of testosterone on the various symptoms and organs involved.
“This study establishes testosterone levels at which various physiological functions start to become impaired, which may help provide a rationale for determining which men should be treated with testosterone supplements,” Finkelstein says. “But the biggest surprise was that some of the symptoms routinely attributed to testosterone deficiency are actually partially or almost exclusively caused by the decline in estrogens that is an inseparable result of lower testosterone levels.”
One of the few testosterone boosters on the market to feature Eurycoma Longifolia, a patented ingredient that was developed at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) for the treatment of sexual dysfunction and male fertility, Tongkat Ali supports increased sex drive through multiple pathways, including boosting one’s free testosterone levels. Great as a standalone testosterone booster and a staple in many people’s post cycle after an anabolic cycle.
While I do have a pretty manly mustache, I’m not a doctor or a medical expert. I’m a guy with a law degree he’s never used who blogs about manliness. What I’m about to share shouldn’t be taken as a substitute for qualified medical expertise. It’s simply my experience and views on the subject. Before you make any changes in lifestyle or diet, talk to your doctor or healthcare provider. Be smart.
My preference is to start men on testosterone, for a couple of reasons. First, if a man has successful return of his own erections, it’s like a home run for him. He doesn’t have to take a pill in anticipation of having sex. He can have sex whenever he wants. Second, the benefits of testosterone-replacement therapy often go way beyond erectile dysfunction. That may be what brought the patient into the office originally, but then he comes back saying how much better he feels in general, how much more energetic and motivated he is, how his drives on the golf course seem to be going farther, and how his mood is better.
It is hard to know how many men among us have TD, although data suggest that overall about 2.1% (about 2 men in every 100) may have TD. As few as 1% of younger men may have TD, while as many as 50% of men over 80 years old may have TD. People who study the condition often use different cut-off points for the numbers, so you may hear different numbers being stated.
Overseas right now, and have an appointment in a few days to get all my levels checked. BTW, I want to just throw this out there. There are a number of companies that are selling “legal pro-hormones” or “test boosters”. I used several types. They were banned several times, and re-introduced, and ultimately have no real FDA oversight. Specifically LG Sciences, and a couple of others I tried. They do work, you will see gains, and quickly. You will gain a lot of water weight. You will get angry. You will eventually damage your liver no matter what their advertising tells you. I had a general physical, and my doctor thought I was an alcoholic…when I do not drink, he was shocked. I’ve flushed it all down the toilet, and the doc said to trim down the powdered supplements as well, as they can be very harmful. So….please heed my warning, that stuff will hurt you.
So if you’re intent on maximizing your testosterone levels, and/or you have applied all of the above and you’re still not satisfied with your results (which would be surprising) then you could try the below. I will point out that some of these tips may not have the scientific evidence to back them up like the previous points, but I can assure you that either I have or do use them (and have positive results), or a client has used them with pleasing results, or finally it is such a new conception that there isn’t enough evidence to prove it one way or another.
While researchers in Brisbane, Australia, found that while Testofen (“a standardized [fenugreek] extract and mineral formulation”) significantly improved the sexual arousal, orgasm, and the general quality of life of participants, it did not remarkably increase testosterone above normal levels. Participants who took Testofen were more satisfied with their energy, well-being, and muscle strength than those who took the placebo.
Zinc is little more of a nice-to-have ingredient than a must-have. It’s on our radar as an ingredient that possibly boosts testosterone levels, and while we couldn’t find enough supporting evidence that taking zinc would increase natural testosterone, low zinc levels have been connected to infertility. A low zinc level is also possibly a sign of hypogonadism. The closest support we found is in a study which found that people recovered from nutritional deficiency-related problems more quickly if they took a zinc supplement than those who did not. Zinc is available in many foods, such as oysters, fortified breakfast cereals, and red meat.

I am 35 and had the non sexual symptoms for awhile now( weight gain/muscle loss, extreme fatigue, lack of clarity/concentration) I got my testosterone levels checked last week and it was 35.4 ng. Not a typo, 35.4. I was told by my dr. That I needed to start TRT right away as low t can effect a lot different things in your body. I did my first injection last night (200mg/ml every 2 weeks) about 8 pm and td now 3:30 am and I’m wide awake and feel extremely motivated to go to the gym and work out. I know each person is different but should I feel like this already, or is it a placebo effect at this point?


Testosterone replacement therapy can successfully treat erectile dysfunction and loss of libido in men with low testosterone from either advancing age or hypogonadism. Although the effects of increased testosterone are more dramatic in hypogonadal men there are also benefits to the libido of men with normal gonadal, also called eugonadal, function. In a 2004 study published in the "Journal of Endocrinology and Metabolism," researchers found that increasing peak testosterone levels to between 400 and 500 percent above baseline in subjects resulted in a significant increase in sexual arousability over placebo subjects.
A number of research groups have tried to further define the relationship of testosterone and body composition by artificial alteration of testosterone levels in eugonadal populations. Induction of a hypogonadal state in healthy men (Mauras et al 1998) or men with prostate cancer (Smith et al 2001) using a gonadotrophin-releasing-hormone (GnRH) analogue was shown to produce increases in fat mass and decreased fat free mass. Another experimental approach in healthy men featured suppression of endogenous testosterone production with a GnRH analogue, followed by treatment with different doses of weekly intramuscular testosterone esters for 20 weeks. Initially the experiments involved men aged 18–35 years (Bhasin et al 2001) but subsequently the study was repeated with a similar protocol in men aged 60–75 years (Bhasin et al 2005). The different doses given were shown to produce a range of serum concentrations from subphysiological to supraphysiological (Bhasin et al 2001). A given testosterone dose produced higher serum concentrations of testosterone in the older age group (Bhasin et al 2005). Subphysiological dosing of testosterone produced a gain in fat mass and loss of fat free mass during the study. There were sequential decreases in fat mass and increases in fat free mass with each increase of testosterone dose. These changes in body composition were seen in physiological and supraphysiological treatment doses. The trend was similar in younger versus older men but the gain of fat mass at the lowest testosterone dose was less prominent in older patients (Bhasin et al 2001; Bhasin et al 2005). With regard to muscle function, the investigators showed dose dependent increases in leg strength and power with testosterone treatment in young and older men but there was no improvement in fatigability (Storer et al 2003; Bhasin et al 2005).
When patients ask about risks, I remind them that they already have testosterone in their system and that the goal of testosterone treatment is to restore its concentration back to what it was 10 or 15 years previously. And the molecule itself that we give is identical to the one that their bodies make naturally, so in theory, everything should be hunky-dory. But in practice, there are always some curveballs.
Present in much greater levels in men than women, testosterone initiates the development of the male internal and external reproductive organs during foetal development and is essential for the production of sperm in adult life. This hormone also signals the body to make new blood cells, ensures that muscles and bones stay strong during and after puberty and enhances libido both in men and women. Testosterone is linked to many of the changes seen in boys during puberty (including an increase in height, body and pubic hair growth, enlargement of the penis, testes and prostate gland, and changes in sexual and aggressive behaviour). It also regulates the secretion of luteinising hormone and follicle stimulating hormone. To effect these changes, testosterone is often converted into another androgen called dihydrotestosterone. 
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